Academic Information

Academic Policies

Undergraduate Programs

Grades

At the end of each term, the student receives a grade in every course of enrollment. All grades, with the exception of I, IP, and RD are final when reported to the registrar at the end of the term. The grade indicates results of examinations, term reports, and general scholastic standing in the entire course, and becomes a part of the student's permanent college record. Once submitted, grades may not be changed unless the result of clerical or procedural error. A student must request a review/change of grade within 30 days after the end of a semester, or within 30 days following the distribution of the grade report containing the grade that the student wishes to challenge. (See procedure in the Student Handbook)

The student's grade point average is computed according to this scale:

A

4.0

Student performance is clearly outstanding.

A-

3.7

Performance indicates sharp insights and an ability to integrate and generalize material beyond the context of the course.

B+

3.3

 

B

3.0

Student performance is above average, demonstrating a knowledge of facts and an ability to integrate and apply material within the context of the course.

B-

2.7

 

C+

2.3

 

C

2.0

Student performance is average, demonstrating knowledge of course content and exhibiting an ability to apply basic concepts within the context of the course.

C-

1.7

 

D

1.0

Student performance is below average, partially fulfilling minimum course requirements. This level of performance may not prepare the student to progress to a more advanced level of study within the subject content or the major. (A grade of D does not satisfy General Education requirements.)

F

0.0

Student performance is unacceptable and does not meet minimum course requirements.

The following are not computed in the GPA:

AU

Audit

CR

Credit given; work C - or better. For field experience and supervised teaching offered by the Education and Psychology Departments, CR signifies B or better in quality.

I

Incomplete

IP

In Progress; deferred grading for graduate thesis, senior project, or undergraduate research work in progress

NC

No Credit given; work of D or F in quality

NG

No Grade received; issued by the Registrar pending receipt of the final grade

*

Course was repeated at a later date

U

Unauthorized withdrawal

W

Withdrawn

X

Courses taken for Associate degree credit only; not computed in the Baccalaureate degree

Grading Policies

All lower division courses required by the major or minor must be completed with no grade lower than a C- and an overall departmental GPA of 2.0 or above. An exception to this college policy occurs when a grade of C (2.0) for departmental prerequisites/requirements is mandated by an outside licensing board, e.g., California Board of Registered Nursing.

All upper division courses required by the major or minor must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or above.

All courses being used to fulfill General Studies requirements must be passed with a grade of C- or better, with the exception of Eng 1A, Eng 1B, and Eng 1C, which must be completed with a grade of C or better . Courses passed with a grade of D can still count as elective units toward graduation.

Academic Standing

As of Spring 2004, academic standing appears on official transcript of Mount St. Mary's College.

Audit

The grading selection of Audit should be requested when a student wishes to preview a course for which he/she will be enrolled at a later date for a grade or to review a course that has already been successfully completed as preparation for further study, or for intellectual curiosity and enrichment. Auditors attend class sessions regularly but are not obligated to take examinations. They receive no credit for courses audited. Tuition is charged for courses taken as audit.

Procedures/Requirements for an Audit:

Students must register for an Audit by the end of the first week of the semester on a space-available basis.

Once requested, the Audit status cannot be reversed.

Students must attend a reasonable number of classes in order to receive an AU on their transcript.

Faculty have the option of requesting other requirements in addition to reasonable attendance such as class participation of students requesting to audit. A space will be provided on the Audit Request Form where faculty can stipulate the conditions agreed upon for the Audit.

If the conditions of the Audit are not met, the instructor may use the grading option of U (Unauthorized Withdrawal).

Credit/No Credit

To encourage a wider choice of courses by lessening the student's concern for the grade point average, selected courses may be taken for CR/NC. The following regulations apply to this option:

Courses used to fulfill General Studies requirements may not be taken CR/NC.

No more than six (6) elective units taken on a CR/NC basis can be applied to the 124 units required for the baccalaureate degree.

Courses which are only offered on a CR/NC basis are not counted as part of the six units.

The deadline for changing the grading in a course to CR/NC is the tenth (10th) week of the semester. Consult the academic calendar or the Registrar's Office for the specific date.

Courses taken on a CR/NC basis may not be applied to requirements for the student's major except at the discretion of the major department.

Once requested and approved the request for CR/NC cannot be reversed.

Incomplete

An Incomplete in a course can be granted only when a student:

  • has fulfilled the majority of the course requirements,
  • has a passing grade in course work,
  • is prevented from completing the assigned work for serious medical/personal reasons,
  • can, in the opinion of the instructor, complete the work within one semester.

Procedures/Requirements for Requesting an Incomplete:

A student requesting an incomplete must obtain the signature and consent of the instructor and the department chairperson before the last day of class and prior to the day of the final exam.

Faculty must assign a default grade when approving an incomplete. This default grade will be recorded on the student's transcript when a completed grade is not assigned by the instructor within one semester and/or an extension of the incomplete is not processed. If a default grade is not provided by the instructor and the work is not completed, the I will revert to an F.

An incomplete may only be extended for one additional semester with the approval of the instructor, the department chairperson, and the appropriate academic dean.

Repetition of Courses with C-/D/F/NC Grades

Only courses for which C-, D, F, and NC were assigned may be repeated for a higher grade or CR. Courses that are required for a student's major/minor may only be repeated one time, either at MSMC or at another institution if approved by the department chairperson. In cases of repeated courses, the units are counted once, and the higher grade is computed in the GPA if the course is repeated at MSMC.

Unauthorized Withdrawal

The designation of Unauthorized Withdrawal or "U" may, at the discretion of the instructor, be assigned in lieu of a grade of F, when a student does not attend a course but fails to officially withdraw, or does not attend a sufficient number of class meetings.

Withdrawal from Courses

The grade of W indicates withdrawal from a course. Students wishing to withdraw from a class must meet the following requirements:

  • The deadline for withdrawing from a class with a grade of W is the end of the tenth (10th) week of the semester.
  • The withdrawal deadline for the Weekend College is the end of the fourth weekend.
  • In cases where a class is offered on a split-semester basis, the deadline for withdrawing is one week after the midpoint of the course.
  • Consult the academic calendar or the Registrar's Office for the specific date.

After the deadline for withdrawal, a student may request permission to be allowed to withdraw from all of her/his classes because of a medical emergency or extraordinary circumstance by submitting an Academic Petition to the appropriate Academic Dean.

The W designation carries no connotation of quality of student performance and is not calculated in the grade point average.

Summer School

Matriculated MSMC students may enroll for a maximum of nine (9) units each summer at another accredited institution until their last year at MSMC. Courses must be approved by the Academic Advisement Center and a Transfer of Credit Form must be completed and approved by the student's advisor before the student enrolls. The College's residency requirement which requires that 30 of the last 39 units prior to graduation need to be taken at Mount St. Mary's College must be honored. Grades received by Mount students for summer school courses are not included in a student's MSMC grade point average. The units for courses passed with a grade of C- or above are accepted and the units are counted toward units required for graduation.

Honor Societies

Alpha Mu Gamma

National Foreign Language Honor Society

Alpha Tau Delta

National Honor Fraternity in Nursing

Delta Epsilon Sigma

National Scholastic Honor Society

Kappa Gamma Pi

National Catholic College Graduate Honor Society

Lambda Iota Tau

National Literature Honor Society

Phi Alpha Theta

International History Honor Society

Pi Delta Phi

National French Honor Society

Pi Theta Mu

Service Honor Society

Psi Chi

National Honor Society in Psychology

Sigma Delta Pi

National Spanish Honor Society

Dean's List

To give public recognition to academic achievement, the Deans of undergraduate programs post a list each term with the names of full-time students who have obtained a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for the preceding semester. To qualify for the Dean's List, a student must have completed at least 12 letter-graded units in the preceding semester or 9 units per semester for Weekend College. Students who have Incompletes (I), Report Delayed (RD), and/or No Grade (NG) on their semester grade reports will not be eligible for the Dean's List until grade(s) are awarded.

Commencement

In order to participate in commencement exercises, a student must be registered for all the courses required to complete degree requirements for graduation. If a student is granted permission to enroll in a course prior to graduation, at an institution other than Mount St. Mary's College, the transcript must be received by June 30 in order to have the degree posted for Spring.

Attendance

Attendance and punctuality are important for successful study. Therefore, the number of a student's absences may be taken into account in determining academic grades. Students may be expected to explain to the instructor the reason for any absences from class and, in some cases, be asked to provide appropriate documentation.

There is no provision for a system of allowed cuts and absences. Students may be dropped from a class for excessive absences (Excessive is defined as missing 20% of the classes.) when, in the opinion of the instructor, further enrollment in the class would be of little value to the student.

Occasionally, a student is excused from class attendance by the Provost for the purpose of representing the College. In such cases, the student is responsible for securing and completing any assignments.

Placement Examinations

All incoming freshmen and transfer students are required to complete placement tests in order to assist them in selecting appropriate courses. Information regarding placement testing will be sent to incoming students prior to the beginning of each semester.

Examinations used to place a student at a level of study may result in lower levels of study being waived. No credit will be awarded as a result of these placement examinations. (See Credit by Exam.)

Algebra and calculus math placement exam scores will be valid for two years only. If students do not take a math course to fulfill their general studies math requirement within two years, they will have to retake the math placement exam.

Academic Internship

The academic internship provides the student with an educational, hands-on experience outside the classroom setting. This experience provides an opportunity to apply classroom theory and sharpen skills in problem-solving. Ordinarily, interns do not get compensated, but they do earn academic credit while participating. Ordinarily, a maximum of six units may be earned through internships. Each academic internship unit is equivalent to 40 hours of supervised time spent in the professional setting. Criteria for evaluation are determined by the faculty sponsor prior to the student's internship. These may include an experience journal, oral reports, and written reports.

Independent Study

A course by Independent Study provides students with the opportunity to initiate and custom design a course of study within their major or minor areas of study. An Independent Study course may not include the content of a regularly scheduled classroom course.

Guidelines for Independent Study

Students assume the responsibility for implementing and presenting the proposed course of study to the sponsoring faculty member for approval and signature through completion of an Independent Study Approval and Application Form (available at the Registrar's Office). When signed by the sponsoring faculty member, academic advisor and student, the document becomes a contract and upon registration becomes an official document within the student's academic file. During the semester, students are responsible for initiating at least four contacts with the supervising faculty member as well as presenting the final independent study project to the faculty member by the end of the semester of registration. The following apply:

  • Lecture and laboratory courses listed in the catalog may not be taken through Independent Study.
  • At least 30 student study/work hours equals one unit of credit, e.g., students enrolled in a 3 unit course will be expected to devote at least 90 hours to the independent study.
  • Independent Study course enrollments are not available to freshmen.
  • No more than two Independent Study and/or Directed Study courses may be taken during a semester.
  • Students must submit the all paperwork for a registration through independent study on or before the end of the add/drop period.

Directed Study

Directed Study provides a means, at the discretion of the regular course instructor, for students to complete a regularly scheduled classroom course when prevented from attending the course for specific reasons. The official catalog course number, followed by DS will be used (e.g., HIS 124 DS: Title). Under the directed study mode, faculty members share the responsibility with students, including the planning of readings and/or projects, and agree to at least six instructional/review meetings during the semester.

Guidelines for Directed Study

Enrollment in regular classroom courses through Directed Study requires the completion of the Directed Study Application and Approval Form. With the consent and assistance of sponsoring faculty members, students complete the learning/study goals, content and criteria for evaluation sections of the form or attach a copy of the regular course syllabus. Upon receipt of required signatures and when filed in the Registrar's Office, these documents become official records within the student's academic file. The following apply:

  • Introductory courses within a discipline may not be taken through Directed Study.
  • Directed Study course enrollments are not available to freshmen.
  • No more than two Directed Study and/or Independent Study courses may be taken during a semester.
  • Ordinarily, regularly scheduled courses are not taken through Directed Study.
  • Students must submit all paperwork for registration through Directed Study on or before the end of the drop/add period.

Academic Integrity

The academic environment is predicated on truth and integrity. Acts of dishonesty constitute a serious offense to the Mount Community. Acts of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Cheating: Cheating of any kind is dishonest. This includes copying other's essays or exams, stealing exams, buying or otherwise procuring new or used exams, having someone else take an exam or write an essay for which you take credit, and any other way you might receive credit for work that is not your own.
  2. Failing to hand in original work: Using one essay for two different classes is also dishonest. If you have a topic appropriate for two classes, original and separate work must be done for each class, unless approval of both instructors has been obtained. Moreover, co-writing an essay without both obtaining the instructor's permission and acknowledging the other person's help is dishonest.
  3. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is an act of academic dishonesty. It is a serious academic offense. Plagiarism is using anyone else's ideas and representing them as your own (i.e., not giving appropriate credit). Acts of plagiarism include the following:
    • failure to document and give credit to an original source,
    • paraphrasing another person's ideas without giving credit,
    • using direct quotes without proper recognition of the source,
    • using statistics, facts, or information from a source other than your own original research without giving credit.
  4. Falsification or misrepresentation: Falsification of lab or clinical data, clandestine collaboration with others in class presentations or laboratory experiments, alteration of College documents, alteration of instructor's grade sheets/books, misrepresentation on admissions materials, falsification of academic records, forgery, entering computer accounts other than one's own without prior consent of the owner, entering or deleting information without permission are all academic offenses.
  5. Theft: Theft or mutilation of library or media materials, computer or media equipment, records or other College documents (such as examinations, assignments, gradebooks or other course materials), or theft from any member of the academic community are all acts of academic dishonesty.

Consequences: Actions such as these should incur, in proportion to the gravity of the offense, appropriate action on the part of the instructor or College representative. The penalty for an act of dishonesty could range from a grade of F on an examination or assignment, a reduced or failing grade for the course in question, probation, suspension or expulsion from the College. Repeated acts of academic dishonesty will be treated more gravely.

Appeal Procedure: Any student of the College has the right to appeal any decision resulting from a perceived act of academic dishonesty. The Academic Integrity Board should be consulted in the case of an appeal or whenever a case involving academic dishonesty has not been resolved at a lower level.

Probation and Dismissal

Academic Probation

A student is placed on probation for failing to maintain a 2.0 GPA for all courses undertaken in a term. A student must achieve a GPA of 2.0 or higher, based on a minimum of 12 letter-graded units, during the following term in order to continue in the college.

Academic Dismissal

A student is subject to dismissal for the following reasons:

  • Failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 1.0 during any term,
  • Failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 during a probationary term, or
  • Failure to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.

Students are notified by the appropriate academic dean of their dismissal. When extenuating circumstances, such as prolonged illness, account for the disqualification, the student may be permitted, on petition to the appropriate academic dean, to continue on probation for the next term.

Enrollment in the College implies willingness on the part of the student to comply with the requirements and regulations of the College. If the student fails to comply with these requirements and regulations, or if it is determined by the dean that the student is not able to benefit from the opportunities offered by the College, withdrawal may be requested even though no specific breach of discipline is charged.

Withdrawal from College

Students thinking of withdrawing from the College should schedule an interview with the Coordinator of the Advisement Center in order to explore other options or assistance.

Students who must withdraw from the College at any time must file a withdrawal notice in the Office of the Registrar. Forms are available from the Advisement Center on both campuses. Students who leave the college for two consecutive semesters without filing appropriate forms are considered withdrawn. Students wishing to re-enter must file an application for re-admission with the Admission Office. (See Business Office for reduced charges which apply when withdrawing from the College.)

Leave of Absence

Students in good academic standing may request a Leave of Absence from the College for one semester. However, after the deadline to withdraw with a W, a Leave of Absence cannot be granted for the current term. Students on a Leave of Absence may not enroll in another institution during the period of Leave of Absence.

Upon request, a Leave of Absence can be extended for one additional semester by the appropriate academic dean. Students on a Leave of Absence are considered continuing students and may pre-register for the next semester at the allotted time and must contact their advisor.

Weekend College students may petition to take a Leave of Absence for three consecutive semesters and will not be required to change their catalog. Also, with the approval of the advisor or director, Weekend College students may petition to enroll at another institution while on a Leave of Absence with the understanding that they may not complete more than 6 units during any semester and no more than a total of 15 units.

Transcripts

Transcripts are issued at the written request of students or graduates to the Office of the Registrar. At the close of each term, transcripts for registered students must be held for inclusion of grades for the term, and therefore will not be available for approximately three (3) weeks. Partial transcripts will not be issued. At times other than the close of the term, the normal period required for processing transcripts is 5 working days. No transcript will be released unless all indebtedness to the college has been satisfied. All transcripts are $10.00 each. Upon completion of degree, students are entitled to a complimentary transcript.

The Registrar's Office at Mount St. Mary's College will only accept transcripts that have been mailed directly to MSMC from another institution. Transcripts that are hand-delivered or mailed by the student to MSMC will not be accepted as "official" and can only be used for purposes of "unofficial evaluation."

Veterans Affairs

Mount St. Mary's College is approved by the Bureau of Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education (BPPVE) to certify veterans and other eligible persons so they may use their education benefits. We adhere to the guidelines for Institutions enrolling and certifying veterans and other eligible persons: develop standards for maintaining adequate records, policies for satisfactory progress, previous education and training, conduct, attendance, and graduation requirements and all other requirements in accordance with Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 21-4253. For more information on Veteran Affairs, contact the Registrar's Office.

Academic Petitions

Students may petition to waive or modify any academic policy or regulation, for good reason, which must be documented. The petition must be approved by the appropriate academic dean. Students file the approved petition in the Office of the Registrar for placement in their permanent file.

Students with Disabilities

Mount St. Mary's College, in compliance with the state and federal laws and regulations including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), does not discriminate on the basis of disability in administration of its education-related programs and activities. The College has an institutional commitment to provide equal educational opportunities for students with disabilities who are otherwise qualified. Students who believe they have been subjected to discrimination on the basis of disability, or have been denied access to services or accommodations required by law, should contact the appropriate campus disability services coordinator for resolution. Mount St. Mary's ADA/Section 504 Grievance Procedure is located in the Student Handbook and copies can be obtained upon request in the Campus Learning Centers or the Office of Student Affairs. The policy may also be viewed on the college website at www.msmc.la.edu, key word, "disability."

Transfer Students

Students transferring into the College bring different backgrounds, goals, education, and experiences. In recognizing this, special efforts are made to provide academic advisement and program planning that build on the learning the student has already acquired. Careful attention is paid to provide assistance in the scheduling of classes so that major requirements as well as college general education requirements are fulfilled.

Transfer students are assigned an academic advisor in the area of their major; the services of the Academic Advisement Center are available to all students.

Appeals of academic regulations and curriculum requirements are possible where such action seems warranted. Students seeking to appeal regulations other than course requirements in their major should obtain a petition from the Academic Advisement Center. The completed form should be taken to the appropriate dean for approval. Students seeking a substitution or waiver of requirements in their major should obtain the written approval of the departmental chairperson. Copies of this approval should be placed in the students' permanent files. Students who wish to challenge their Transfer of Credit Evaluation must do so by the end of their first semester at MSMC.

Credit by Exam

In selected departments, course credit by challenge examination is available on a limited basis and at the discretion of the department chairperson. The student must file the approved form in the Office of the Registrar. Only units of CREDIT will be awarded for these examinations (No record of failures will appear on a student's transcript.). All credit awarded in this manner will be so noted on the student's transcript. A course may only be challenged by examination once. Students may also take externally administered standard proficiency exams such as CLEP (College-Level Examination Program from CEEB) and PEP (Professional Equivalency Program from ACT) in those areas approved by the College. Information about these exams and a current list of approved exams are available from the office of the baccalaureate dean. Credit for CLEP or PEP exams taken prior to enrolling at Mount St. Mary's College and which appear on the transcript of record from another college or university will be accepted according to the transfer of credit procedure. If there has been no official awarding of credit, an original transcript from ACT or CEEB must be presented. Students who have taken courses sponsored by the armed forces or other non-collegiate agencies may apply for an evaluation of these learning experiences.

For the Baccalaureate degree, a maximum of 12 units may be secured through CLEP/PEP exams in areas approved by the College. All units earned in this manner are held in escrow until the student has successfully completed 30 units of course work at Mount St. Mary's College.

For the Associate degree, a maximum of 8 units of credit may be secured through credit by departmental exam and/or CLEP/PEP exams in areas approved by the College. All units earned in this manner are held in escrow until the student has successfully completed 24 units of course work at Mount St. Mary's College.

Advanced Standing

Advanced standing is determined on an individual basis and is not decided until an evaluation of all previous academic work has been completed. Original transcripts must also be submitted for all proficiency or advanced placement credit awards (CLEP, PEP, AP). A maximum of 36 semester units for course work taken in an accredited college is transferable toward the Associate degree. No more than 66 transferable community college units may be applied toward the units required for a Baccalaureate degree.

Students transferring from foreign schools, colleges, and universities must submit original copies of their academic records and translations from an approved translating service. The Admission Office can provide a list of approved agencies.

Credit for courses taken at other accredited colleges or universities is transferable provided that the transferred courses satisfy curriculum requirements at Mount St. Mary's College. The following courses ordinarily do not transfer:

  • Cooperative Education
  • Freshman Orientation
  • Continuing Education
  • Pre-college Math, Writing, Reading
  • Directed and Independent Studies
  • English as a Second Language
  • Special Studies
  • Business Skills (typing, shorthand, etc.)
  • Selected/Special Topics
  • Vocational and Technical Internships, Practicums, Field Work

No more than 2.0 units in physical education and 6.0 units in applied art may be transferred from any college or university.

In the case of courses in which grades of C-, D, or F are repeated, only the better grade will be transferred. In cases where a course in which a grade of C or better has been repeated, only the C will be accepted.

Courses are evaluated by the Advisement Center for general studies applicability. The determination of whether courses transferred into the College may serve as fulfillment of major or minor requirements is made by the appropriate department. Those courses not accepted in the major or minor may count as general electives.

A transfer credit summary and determination of advanced standing will be prepared by the Advisement Center after all transcripts of all previous college work have been submitted. A final credit summary will be prepared during the first semester of attendance once all final transcripts have been submitted. Failure to submit required transcripts may prevent students from enrolling in classes. Students may not receive credit for transcripts of prior work submitted after the first semester of attendance. Students who wish to challenge the transfer credit summary must do so by the end of their first semester at Mount St. Mary's College.

Concurrent Enrollment Policy and Transfer of Credit

Once admitted to and enrolled in the College, students are normally expected to pursue study only at Mount St. Mary's College during the Fall and Spring semesters. Students seeking an exception to Concurrent Enrollment Policy must file an Academic Petition and Transfer of Credit Clearance Form in the Office of the Registrar prior to registration at another institution.

Classification of Students

To be classified as a sophomore, a student must have satisfactorily completed 30 semester units towards the Mount St. Mary's College undergraduate degree, and have 1-2 more semesters of work to complete before fulfilling associate degree requirements or 5-6 more semesters of work to complete before fulfilling baccalaureate degree requirements or the unit equivalent; as a junior, a minimum of 60 semester units and 3-4 semesters of work to complete; as a senior, 90 semester units and 1-2 semesters of work to complete.

A student with full-time status must carry 12-18 units per semester. Part-time students carry less than 12 units per semester. Foreign students (with non-immigrant F-1 student status) enrolled in beginning ESL (on or off campus) plus nine semester units may be considered as students with full-time status.

Non-matriculating students may take a course or courses for academic credit without following a prescribed curriculum toward a degree.

Ordinarily a student should be a sophomore before enrolling in upper division courses. It is the student's responsibility to be aware of prerequisites or requirements for enrolling in upper division courses.

Application for Graduation with a Degree

Students applying for graduation must file a graduation application in the Registrar's Office before the end of the semester prior to the term of project completion. See the Registrar's Office for specific dates and forms.

Degree Completion:

Associate of Arts Students

Full-time traditional students continuously enrolled the MSMC Associate of Arts degree program must complete all degree requirements in six semesters, excluding Leaves of Absence. Failure to complete degree requirements within this time frame would result in dismissal from the College.

Baccalaureate Students

Full-time traditional students continuously enrolled in the MSMC Baccalaureate degree program must complete all degree requirements in six years and/or twelve semesters, excluding Leaves of Absence. Failure to complete degree requirements within this time frame would result in dismissal from the College.

Returning Students

A student who wishes to return to MSMC to complete his/her degree (either Associate or Baccalaureate) after an absence of six or more years must return under the catalog in effect when the readmission is granted. All General Studies requirements must be completed. The department chair will determine requirements necessary to complete the major

Associate in Arts Degrees

Through the Associate in Arts Program students have the opportunity to develop academic competencies. Faculty and staff offer excellence in their specialized fields and show concern for the individual student. The fundamental goal of this program is to provide knowledge and skills for an enriched life and the foundation for further education. Students in the AA Program also are able to explore various options in determining careers and the skills necessary for employment.

All courses are transferable to the Mount St. Mary's College Baccalaureate degree program unless otherwise stated. Students wishing to transfer to other four year campuses should consult the colleges of their choice about the transferability of courses.

Students who enter the Associate degree program are required to complete a series of tests including reading, writing and math prior to registering for classes. These proficiency tests must be passed before students may receive their AA degree or transfer to the Baccalaureate degree at the Chalon Campus.

The specializations are designed to prepare students for transfer to a Baccalaureate program or employment upon graduation.

Four semesters are usually required to complete the AA degree. Students with academic deficiencies may need an additional semester. Students may continue in the AA program for 6 semesters in order to fulfill requirements to graduate or to transfer to the Baccalaureate program. Students must be enrolled in an English course every semester until they have successfully completed ENG 6A and 6B and/or ENG 1A and 1B.

Majors Offered

Mount St. Mary's College confers the Associate in Arts degree with the following majors:

Business Administration

Early Childhood Education

Graphic Design

Health and Human Services

Liberal Arts

Media Communication

Nursing (ADN program)

Pre-Health Science

A complete description of the requirements for each major as well as course descriptions may be found in the Courses of Instruction section of this catalog.

Students are governed by the catalog under which they enter MSMC. If subsequent catalogs have changes in major/minor or general studies requirements which are in the students' favor, they may be substituted at the option of the students.

Academic Policies

Credit Load

A full-time student is defined as a student who is enrolled in a minimum of 12 units and a maximum of 18 units per semester.

Graduation with Honors (Associate in Arts Degree)

Graduation With Honors shall be granted to a student who has earned the Associate in Arts degree and achieved a cumulative 3.5 grade point average at the end of term prior to the last term of attendance.

The student's grade point average will be calculated on the basis of grades earned at Mount St. Mary's College, as well as college course credits and grades earned prior to the time of matriculation.

Courses completed at another institution after matriculation are not computed into the cumulative grade point average with the exception of approved exchange programs.

Inter-Program Transfer

Mount St. Mary's College offers students who begin their studies in the Associate degree program the opportunity to transfer to the Baccalaureate program. Students wishing to transfer must have completed two semesters at MSMC with a 2.4 grade point average, have passing scores on the proficiency tests, have completed ENG 1A, and take the following steps:

  1. Request a Program Change Application from the Academic Advisement Center, the Intercampus Transfer Office or the Registrar's Office; obtain the signatures of the academic advisor, the testing coordinator, and the intercampus transfer coordinator.
  2. If requesting to transfer to the Nursing or Liberal Studies majors, have the transfer form approved by the department.
  3. Have completed ENG 1A and be enrolled in ENG 1B or 1C (if not already completed) during the first semester at the Chalon Campus.
  4. Submit this form to the Intercampus Transfer Office to obtain verification of transferable units and cumulative GPA.

Students who transfer prior to receiving their AA degree cannot request it retroactively.

Students will be notified of their preliminary acceptance into the Baccalaureate program by the Intercampus Transfer Office. Students will be notified of final approval after the verification of semester grades.

Integration of Theory and Practice

Experience endeavors to relate personal growth and learning to the more practical aspects of life. Opportunities for experience can occur both inside and outside the college.

The Intro to College Studies course facilitates the incoming student's adjustment to the demands of college life by teaching skills for personal effectiveness and presenting strong female role models in various careers. Students work in small groups with staff and peer counselors to discuss concerns, explore values and goals, and practice communication skills.

Social Action/Fieldwork extends the learning process beyond campus limits. The student becomes aware of important issues in society. Opportunities are offered for career-related experiences and the blending of theory and practice. In Social Action or Service Learning courses, the student performs supervised volunteer services such as tutoring, hospital volunteer work, child care, home visiting, and the like. In Field Work the student engages in supervised fieldwork as determined by the major.

Associate in Arts Degree Requirements

  1. Completion of at least 60 semester units with a grade point average of 2.0 (a C average) for all college work undertaken at Mount St. Mary's College.
  2. Residency Requirement: 30 of the last 39 units must be taken at MSMC
  3. Required Courses

Required courses:

Communication Skills (minimum of 6 units) - GS I:

ENG 6AB or ENG 1AB/C

(Students must be enrolled in an English class every semester until they have successfully completed English 1B.)

Arts and Sciences (minimum of 9 units) - GS II:

At least one course must be taken from three of the following categories.

A. Art, Music, Literature

ART 2

Design I

(3)

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

MUS 6

The Fine Arts: Music

(3)

ENG 12

Literary Analysis

(3)

ENG 15

Literature & Society

(3)

ENG 16

Literature & the Human Experience

(3)

ENG 17

Literary Focus

(3)

ENG 25

Mythmaking: Quest for Meaning

(3)

ENG 27

Women in Quest

(3)

ENG 28

Contemporary Issues in World Literature

(3)

B. History, Contemporary Economics, Politics

HIS 1A

Western Civilization I

(3)

HIS 1B

Western Civilization II

(3)

HIS 25

Geography

(3)

HIS 75

Contemporary America

 

ECO 2

Macroeconomics

(3)

POL 1

American Government

(3)

 

 

 

C. Natural, Physical Sciences

BIO 5

Life Science

(3)

BIO 10

Health Science

(3)

BIO 50A

Anatomy

(4)

BIO 50B

Physiology

(4)

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

D. Social, Behavioral Sciences

ECO 1

Microeconomics

(3)

POL 2

Introduction to World Politics

(3)

PSY 1

General Psychology

(3)

PSY 12

Child/Human Development

(3)

SOC 5

Sociological Perspectives

(3)

SOC 6

Family, Child and Community

(3)

Philosophy(3) - GS III:

PHI 10, Critical Thinking , required for ADN program

Religious Studies - GS IV:

RST 41, Christian Ethics, required for ADN program.

Intro to College Studies(1) - GS V:

SPR 85

(1)

Outreach - GS VI:

SPR 60A

Social Action

(1)

-or-

Fieldwork or clinical experience required by specific majors

-or-

Successful completion of a service learning class (SL) Diversity (3 units)

Diversity (3 units) - GS VII:

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

ENG 27

Women in Quest

(3)

HIS 25

Cultural Geography

(3)

MUS 6

The Fine Arts: Music

(3)

PHI 15

Challenges in Philosophy

(3)

PHI 21

Moral Values

(3)

PHI 92

Business Ethics

(3)

POL 2

Introduction to World Politics

(3)

RST 61

World Religions

(3)

RST 78

Death and Afterlife

(3)

SOC 5

Sociological Perspectives

(3)

Quantitative Literacy (3 units) - GS VIII:

(a minimum of 3 units, taken from either category, QL1 or QL2)

A. Quantitative Literacy 1 (QL1)

BUS 16AB

Accounting Principles I,II

(4,4)

MTH 50

Elementary Number Systems

(3)

NUR 20

Adaptation Model Nursing Theory

(2)

NUR 30

Pharmacology

(2)

PHI 5

Introduction to Logic

(3)

B. Quantitative Literacy 2 (QL2)

MTH 10

Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematical Ideas

(3)

MTH 28

Mathematical Analysis for Business

(3)

MTH 38

Elements of Probability and Statistics

(3)

MTH 51

Elements of Geometry and Statistics

(3)

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

PSY 40

Basic Statistical Methods

(3)

4. Completion of program requirements. (Listed under departments.)

5. A maximum of four units of SPR and PED combined may be applied to requirements for the Associate degree.

6. For the Associate degree, 24 semester units must be completed during the last two semesters at Mount St. Mary's College. Of these, a minimum of 12 semester units must be in students' major and earned in regular course work.

7. In order to participate in commencement exercises, students must have completed all requirements for graduation.

8. Skill in writing, reading, and basic math evidenced by passing scores in proficiency tests.

9. The student must file a graduation application in the Registrar's Office by the end of the term prior to the term of completion.

Academic Support Services

Academic Advisement

The Doheny Academic Advisement program for the Associate of Arts degree is coordinated through the Academic Advisement Center. The Doheny Advisement program consists of faculty advisors, Academic Advisement Center advisors, first year Orientation Advising and several workshops providing information about summer school attendance and Study Away programs.

Each student is assigned an advisor who will assist in clarifying program requirements, class schedules, and academic and career goals. The students meet with their advisor at least once a semester for advisement and registration purposes. However, students are encouraged to visit their advisors to build a positive advisor-student relationship. To further serve the students' advisement needs, the Academic Advisement Center also functions as a drop-in office for on-going guidance and referral services.

Although the individual faculty advisors and the Advisement Center staff make every effort to provide advisement for the student, it is ultimately the student's responsibility to see that all procedures are followed and all requirements are fulfilled.

Learning Resource Center

The Learning Resource Center oversees the English classes' Skills Labs, supervises students still working for reading, writing, and math proficiencies, and provides tutors for most areas of the undergraduate curriculum. Students in developmental English classes spend an assigned hour a week receiving instruction in diagnosed grammatical and compositional skills not yet mastered. With tutors, computer or AV aids, students also work to acquire a certain proficiency in reading, writing, and basic math. Students may also request a tutor or organize a study group for other areas of the curriculum, e.g., psychology, sociology, geography, etc.

Students are encouraged to make appointments for any extra time they may need, but occasionally drop-ins can also be accommodated.

Skills Programs

The ability to communicate is one of the basic tools of learning. A student must be able to receive and to transmit information accurately. This process involves reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as understanding non-verbal messages. A student must be able to think logically and apply knowledge to problems and situations at hand. In order to facilitate the acquisition of these tools, the following programs are offered:

College Skills

Specialized courses in areas such as study skills, reading, math, and English are provided for students whose previous performance and/or test results indicate they might experience academic difficulty. These courses are required for students who are academically underprepared.

Summer Skills Workshop

The Workshop in Study Skills, offered prior to freshman year, enables interested students to get a better start in their college careers. Students receive one unit of AA credit for successfully completing a class in study skills and two other classes chosen from classes in writing, math, reading, and studying the sciences.

Library Facilities

The Charles Willard Coe Memorial Library, located on the Chalon Campus, is the principal library of Mount St. Mary's College. Constructed in 1947, the Coe Library houses the majority of print library materials for both campuses and also houses the Instructional Media Center, an Office of Institutional Technology (OIT), administered repository for non-print media, and the hardware necessary to non-print media use. The facility is intended primarily for individual and small group use but also circulates its sound and image collections for use in the classroom. There is an OIT administered Computer Lab on the 4th floor.

The J. Thomas McCarthy Library on the Doheny Campus is housed in the Sr. Magdalen Coughlin Learning Complex.

The libraries serving the two campuses currently hold over 130,000 volumes and carry subscriptions to over 800 print periodicals. Moreover, the OIT administered IMTC contains over 5500 titles of non-print media material. Print and non-print materials are lent from one library to the other to accommodate the changing curriculum and to meet the needs of faculty and students, who are also permitted to use both collections in person. The libraries hold subscriptions to a number of bibliographic and full-text on-line databases in a wide variety of academic subject areas. There are three book databases as well as numerous journal article and proprietary materials databases. Please consult the Libraries' Research Resources WebPages for a list of current subscriptions.

Computer Labs

The Doheny Campus has two complete computer labs. Each has laser printers available.

Macintosh Lab, located in room 120, Bldg. 4, has 18 iMac, networked computers. Each has the Microsoft Office software suite and web browsing capabilities. The lab is open daily for student and faculty use.

The main student computer lab in Bldg. 3, room B-104, has 25 networked Dell workstations. Each has a ZIP drive for large file access and storage, the Microsoft Office software suite and web browsing capabilities. The lab is open daily for student and faculty use.

Title V grant-funded labs, located in Bldg. 4, rooms 111, 119, 206, 209, and 211, have networked Dell computers. Each has the Microsoft Office software suite and web browsing capabilities. The labs are also used as classrooms and are open daily for student and faculty use when there are no classes in session.

A.A. Student Cross-Enrollment at Chalon

Associate of Arts students may take a limited number of units at Chalon. Ordinarily students admitted to the AA Program do not take classes at Chalon during their first semester. However, if there is need for a sequence course such as biology, chemistry, math, or music, a maximum of eight units may be taken during the first two semesters. Unless noted in program requirements, AA students do not take upper division courses until completion of ENG 1B. (Chalon students have priority registration for Chalon classes; Doheny students for Doheny classes.)

After two (2) semesters in the AA Program, students with a 2.4 cum GPA may take a maximum of seven (7) units during their third semester and as many as nine (9) units during their fourth semester at the Chalon Campus.

Student Affairs

Mount St. Mary's College provides students with programs and experiences conducive to personal, cultural, ethical, social, physical, spiritual, and intellectual growth. Student initiative and responsibility are encouraged in an atmosphere of close interrelation among students, faculty, administration and staff.

Campus Ministry

Campus Ministry seeks to develop and sustain awareness of the spiritual dimension of life which is at the heart of the College's mission, assisting students, faculty and staff to grow spiritually in accordance with their own religious traditions. Catholic in our roots and vision, we welcome an opportunity to be of service to persons of every religious persuasion or none at all, and commit ourselves to respect for the freedom of each person's conscience and unique path.

The Campus Ministry team consists of a director, two coordinators (each focused on one of our two campuses), student coordinators and office staff. Together, they are responsible for a number of areas: Prayer and Spirituality; Liturgy (including Sunday Mass, reconciliation services and other prayer services); the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults (for those who wish to become Catholic); preparation for Confirmation, Eucharist and other sacraments; Bible Study and other educational efforts; retreats; campus festivities and observances; and community service opportunities, including action and reflection for Social Justice. Individual counseling and conversations are also available to any member of the campus community.

Our Lady of Mercy Chapel is the central place for worship and prayer on the Doheny campus. People of all faith backgrounds are welcome there, whether for an afternoon Mass, an evening Rosary with friends, or for personal quiet reflection.

You are always welcome to the Campus Ministry office, whether you are a student, faculty or staff member, whatever your religious tradition.

Career Services

Career Services provides students with the opportunity for individual counseling to assist with skills assessment, resume writing, and interviewing techniques. Professional staff members are available to help students research information on career positions, as well as internship and volunteer options. In addition, the Career Services staff fosters on-going relationships with a variety of organizations and corporations in order to develop internship and employment opportunities for students.

A variety of events are offered through Career Services. Annual events include a yearly etiquette dinner, on – campus Career Fairs, and workshops designed to provide students with a variety of information on job search skills and techniques. A course on Careers in Health is offered, and is a requirement for all Pre-health Bio and Nursing majors

Career Services maintains several web-based resources including the Mount Career Network. This on-line job posting system provides students with access to full-time and part-time job listings, as well as volunteer and internship opportunities. Additional resources include an on-campus career resource library consisting of books on interviewing, resume writing, major and career options, and job search.

Service Learning and Community Engagement

In the spirit of the mission and strategic planning of Mount St. Mary's College, community engagement opportunities exist to offer MSMC students off-campus service and learning experiences at community organizations that promote human and community development. Service-Learning faculty, Career Services staff, the Women's Leadership Program, and the office of Community Engagement work collaboratively with MSMC students to promote healthy, socially-just communities in the greater Los Angeles area. In order to gain knowledge and understanding, assess their own learning through reflection and structured experiences, and become life-long committed advocates for social justice in our world, all Mount students are encouraged to participate in a variety of community engagement and service-learning opportunities.

Commuter Services

Commuter students are an active and vital part of the Mount St. Mary's College community. Commuter Services is dedicated to meeting the needs of commuter students by providing various programs and services. These services include off-campus housing referrals, lockers, a carpool program, a Commuter Lounge in the Wigwam, social events and more. Please contact Commuter Services for more information.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS)

MSMC recognizes that emotional health and personal growth are essential components of a successful academic experience. The mission of Counseling and Psychological Services is to enhance the emotional growth of students by promoting balanced lifestyles, positive self-esteem and essential life skills with an emphasis on the development of the whole person. CPS provides psychological counseling services and psychoeducational programs for students, as well as responsive consultation to the college community. In counseling, students discuss issues such as stress, anxiety, depression, academic concerns, family and relationship problems, grief, loneliness, eating issues, alcohol/drug problems, dating violence and self-esteem difficulties. Counseling services are available to current MSMC full-time traditional undergraduates, accelerated nursing students, and physical therapy graduate students. After the initial appointment, a recommendation will be made for individual counseling, group sessions, or referrals to services in the community. Our counseling is short-term, not to exceed twelve sessions per academic year as determined by your counselor. It may be in the best interest of the client to receive long-term therapy, specialized treatment or other referrals; in these cases, students will be referred out to services in the community.

All sessions are confidential in keeping with professional ethics and state laws. Information about clients is not shared with their families, the faculty, college administrators, or anyone else without the student's written permission. The exception to this policy is when limited disclosure is required by law to protect the student or someone else from harm. Counseling and Psychological Services is staffed by licensed psychologists, advanced doctoral level interns, and postdoctoral fellows.

Fitness Education

Mount St. Mary's College is committed to graduating well-balanced women with a strong sense of self and physical well being. The Fitness Education Department offers two programs that complement the academic program: the physical education courses offered for academic credit, and a wellness and fitness program, including nutrition. The two programs together provide students with the opportunity to attain, improve and/or maintain their physical fitness, attend informative workshops on wellness and fitness, participate in recreational activities on or off the campus, and participate in intramural volleyball, basketball, and tennis programs. Facilities include a pool, fitness center equipped with cardiovascular and weight training equipment, and a tennis-basketball-volleyball court.

Institute for Student Academic Enrichment (ISAE)

ISAE is a federally funded Student Support Services/TRIO program designed to assist first-generation, low-income and/or disabled students in achieving their maximum potential in higher education. ISAE provides eligible students academic advisement, peer tutoring and mentoring, career and personal counseling, financial aid information, workshops and leadership and cultural enrichment opportunities. ISAE is located in Building 7 at Doheny.

Orientation / First-Year Seminar

The Orientation program is designed to assist entering students with their transition to Mount St. Mary's College and to enhance their success at college. Orientation includes an introduction to both the academic and student life aspects of the college and provides for the interaction of new students with faculty, staff, and current students. Orientation for new first-year students is held in July with separate activities for parents. Orientation activities include a movie night and service-learning project. In addition, placement testing, advisement, and course registration are available.

First-year students continue their orientation to the college in SPR 85 (Introduction to College Studies), a one-unit seminar course taught in the fall semester. This class is designed to facilitate the transition from high school to the college environment and provides opportunities to become more familiar with college resources, policies and procedures, study skills, and other strategies for college success.

Residence Life

Living on at Mount St. Mary's Chalon and Doheny campus can be an enjoyable experience, providing a unique opportunity for individual and group participation in residence hall life. Living and learning occur throughout the residence hall system and life in the halls complements the academic life of the classroom. Living in the Residence Halls provides opportunities to participate in many activities. A variety of programs and services will be available to you, allowing you to develop personally, spiritually, intellectually, socially, and culturally. Only full-time traditional undergraduates may live in undergraduate housing.

Student residence life is largely self-regulated, under the direction of the Residence Life Staff composed of the Director, Assistant Directors, Administrative Assistant, Graduate Housing Coordinator, Head Resident Assistants and Resident Assistants.

For more detailed information on Residence Life guidelines, see the Student Handbook.

An off-campus housing referral listing is available through the Student Activities and Commuter Services Office.

Student Involvement

College involvement gives the student the opportunity to become a vital part of the institution. Students are encouraged to serve on college committees and to initiate religious, cultural, and social activities. The small college atmosphere offers many opportunities for participation in student government and campus organizations.

Many organizations are open to the Mount students in an effort to broaden their experiences. Among these, the Associated Student Body sponsors a wide range of social, cultural, recreational, volunteer, and religious activities. The ASB meets regularly to discuss student issues and to promote student involvement. Several occasions arise each year for interaction with Baccalaureate students at Chalon as well as with students of surrounding colleges. Special interests are represented in various clubs and organizations.

Student Ambassador Program

The Student Ambassador Program is one of MSMC's partnership programs designed to motivate inner-city high school students to complete high school and aspire to a college education. The ambassadors help high school students understand what skills they need to acquire and what courses to take to qualify for college admission, and assist them with identifying appropriate colleges to which they can apply, completing admissions applications and researching financial aid. The program provides leadership and service opportunities to Mount students by engaging them in outreach in the Los Angeles area. Currently, ambassadors serve in 40 high schools, 5 middle schools, and several Los Angeles City housing developments. By helping these high school students to plan for college, improve study skills and envision satisfying and rewarding careers, Mount students are able to give back to the community while developing their own counseling and time-management skills. The Student Ambassador Program continues a long-standing Mount tradition of service to the local and world community.

Student Health Services

Mount St. Mary's College Health Services Department offers a broad range of services to both resident and commuter students. Emphasis is placed on preventive medicine and on positive health practices which will become a part of each student's lifestyle. Health education programs designed to assist students in developing values and skills related to achieving a high level of health are presented each semester.

Regular, full-time students at the Doheny Campus who pay the Comprehensive Student Fee may access Student Health Services at both the Doheny and Chalon campuses. The Doheny Health Office is staffed by a Registered Nurse who is available to provide treatment of minor illness and injuries, health references, health teaching, immunizations and laboratory testing. Appointments are also available with the Nurse Practitioner who is scheduled at the Doheny campus weekly.

The Chalon Health Center is staffed by nurse practitioners, nurses and specially trained students. Services include diagnosis and treatment of illnesses and minor injuries, physical examinations, health teaching, immunizations, and laboratory testing. Appointments may be made throughout the week. Students who pay the Comprehensive Student Fee may see a medical provider or nurse at no expense. There may be minor charges for laboratory testing and medications. When the Student Health Center is closed, a Medical Provider is on-call and available for consultation.

The Medical Director and physicians from the Peak Health Medical Group provide oversight, consultation and clinical review at both campuses.

Incoming freshmen and transfer students, both resident and commuters, must submit a current health history and physical examination prior to entrance. Proof of current immunizations and TB skin testing are also required for admission. Additional health requirements exist for students enrolled in programs with clinical affiliations.

All full-time, regular students are required to carry Health and Accident Insurance. Please see the expense listings at the beginning of this catalog for additional information regarding health insurance available through Mount St. Mary's College.

Women’s Leadership Program

The Women's Leadership Program offers many opportunities for leadership skill building and development in order to prepare students as leaders in their communities and future careers. Students are encouraged to develop and strengthen their personal, team, group, and citizen leadership skills throughout their time at the Mount. The program supports students in developing leadership skills through co-curricular activities, workshops, internships, and participation in national conferences.

All MSMC students have the opportunity to document their co-curricular activities in the form of a Leadership Transcript. In addition, freshmen and sophomore students are can apply to be part of the Leadership Scholar Program. Students who are part of the Leadership program have opportunities to develop their leadership potential by taking courses and participating in group service projects and other developmental experiences.

The following courses in Leadership are taught by program staff:

LWS 1A & 1B

Introduction to Leadership Concepts

Year-long course/Fall & Spring

LWS 1C

Orientation Leader Training

Spring

LWS 5

Leadership in Action

Spring

Baccalaureate Degrees

Majors Offered

American Studies

Art

Biological Sciences

Business Administration

Chemistry

Child Development

Documentary Film and Social Justice

English (including Weekend College)

English and Business Administration (including Weekend College)

French Studies

Gerontology

History

Liberal Arts (Weekend College only)

Liberal Studies (for elementary teaching credential students)

Mathematics

Music

Philosophy

Political Science

Psychology

Religious Studies

Sociology (including Weekend College)

Spanish and Business Administration

Spanish Studies

The Bachelor of Science with majors in:

Biochemistry

Biological Sciences

Business Administration (Weekend College only)

Chemistry

Nursing

Social Work

Individually Designed Major

The Individually Designed Major is available to students interested in giving further creative direction to their own education. These student are encouraged to utilize alternative modes of education and to assume leadership in initiating educational and cultural experiences. Admission to the Individually Designed Major presumes the ability on the part of the student to engage in independent study. Freshmen are eligible to pursue an IDM after the successful completion of their first semester at Mount St. Mary's College.

Information is available in the Advisement Center and from the Baccalaureate dean.

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

  1. Completion of at least 124 semester units with a grade point average of 2.0 (C average) for all college work undertaken at Mount St. Mary's College. A minimum of 45 semester units must be in upper division work.
  2. Completion of a major, as designated by the major department.
  3. Satisfaction of the senior residence requirement. Residence is defined as 30 of the last 39 units before graduation must be taken at Mount St. Mary's College. A minimum of 12 upper division units must be in the student's major and earned in regular course work at Mount St. Mary's College.
  4. Completion of a Mount St. Mary's College general studies program.
  5. Required Course: Introduction to College Studies (SPR 85) is required of all freshmen entering college with fewer than 24 units.
  6. Must file a graduation application in the Registrar's Office by the end of the term prior to the term of projected completion.

In order to participate in commencement exercises students must be registered for all courses needed to complete degree and college requirements. If a student is granted permission to enroll in a course prior to graduation at an institution other than Mount St. Mary's College, the transcript must be received by June 30.

All courses used to fulfill general Studies requirements must be passed with a grade of C- or above, with the exception of Eng 1A, Eng 1B, and Eng 1C, which must be completed with a grade of C or better.

A student is governed by the catalog under which he/she enters MSMC. If subsequent catalogs have changes in major/minor or General Studies requirements which are in the student's favor, they may be substituted, by the department chair, at the option of the student. Changes in College policies and procedures apply to all students.

General Studies Curriculum

An educated person is one who is not only academically prepared in an area of specialization but also one who has knowledge and appreciation of the diverse fields of human endeavor. To achieve this, a student is expected to explore areas of learning outside the major through the General Studies curriculum. The College has adopted the following components of a liberal education as fundamental in developing excellence of mind and spirit. The components are integrated into the educational program, and into the General Studies Curriculum, in a way that enables the growth of students as free, imaginative, and responsible human beings, sensitive and responsive to the needs of the human person and human society. These components are:

  1. effective written expression of ideas;
  2. effective oral communication;
  3. analysis of assumptions, methods of argumentation, values;
  4. problem-solving: defining problems, identifying issues; organizing, analyzing, synthesizing ideas; comparing, contrasting ideas; decision-making;
  5. understanding of personal and group behavior;
  6. effective participation in a group or organization;
  7. sense of history as providing perspective for interpreting human events;
  8. sense of literature as reflecting and interpreting human experience;
  9. understanding of and appreciation for music and the visual arts;
  10. curiosity about and a spirit for investigating the natural universe;
  11. ability to recognize patterns of thought used in science and mathematics;
  12. understanding of the impact of advancing technology on human society and culture;
  13. understanding of social classes and social structures in diverse societies;
  14. understanding of contemporary economic, social, and political issues;
  15. understanding of criteria and standards to assess personal moral values and ethical judgments;
  16. openness to understanding of and respect for philosophical, religious, and ethnic diversity;
  17. awareness of the religious and spiritual dimensions of human existence.

General Studies Requirements

The following structure and content for the General Studies Curriculum applies to Bachelor degrees except that there is no modern language requirement for the Bachelor of Science degree. Students may not take general studies courses on a credit/no-credit basis. All courses used to fulfill General Studies requirements must be passed with a grade of C- or above, with the exception of Eng 1A, Eng 1B, and Eng 1C, which must be completed with a grade of C or better.

The college policy on challenge examinations will prevail in the General Studies Curriculum.

Communication Skills (minimum 7 units) - GS I:

A. Written (6 units)

ENG 1A B/C

Freshman English (Completion with a grade of C or better)

(3,3)

ENG 5H

Freshman Honors English

(3)

B. Oral (1-3 units)

SPE 10

Introduction to Communication

(2)

SPE 12

Business and Professional Communication

(1)

POL 133

Moot Court

(1-3)

POL 134

International Organization-MUN

(3)

POL 135

Selected Problems in International Organization

(3)

SOC 30

Human Communication

(3)

Critical Thinking (minimum 3 units) - GS II:

BIO 151

Medical Physiology

(4)

ENG 1C

Freshman English

(3)

NUR 138

Research in Nursing

(3)

PHI 5

Introduction to Logic

(3)

PHI 10

Critical Thinking

(3)

PHI 155

Symbolic Logic

(3)

Arts and Sciences (minimum 21 units) - GS III:

At least one course must be taken in each of the following categories (A - G):

A. Art or Music

ART 2

Design I

(3)

ART 3/103

Visual Thinking

(3)

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

ART 7/107

Experiences in the Visual Arts

(3)

ART 170

History of Art: Ancient thru Medieval

(3)

ART 171

History of Art: Renaissance thru Romanticism

(3)

ART 172

History of Art: Modern World

(3)

ART 173

Multiculturalism and the Visual Arts

(3)

ART 174

Women in Contemporary Art

(3)

MUS 6/106

Varieties of Music

(3)

MUS 25/125

Music Masterpieces

(3)

INT 93AB/193AB

Guided Experiences in the Arts

(1.5,1.5)

INT 95/195

Study/Travel: European History and Culture

(3)

B. Literature

ENG

12/112

Literary Analysis

(3)

ENG 15

Literature and Society

(3)

ENG 16

Literature and the Human Experience

(3)

ENG 17

Literary Focus

(3)

ENG 18/118

Great Works in World Literature

(3)

ENG 19/119

Great Works in British Literature

(3)

ENG 20/120

Great Works in American Literature

(3)

ENG 21/121

Classical Epic and Drama

(3)

ENG 25/125

Mythmaking: The Quest for Meaning

(3)

ENG 26

Literature of the American West

(3)

ENG 27/127

Women in Quest

(3)

ENG 28/128

Contemporary Issues in World Literature

(3)

ENG 32/132

Literature of Los Angeles

(3)

ENG 70/170

Western Literary Heritage

(3)

ENG 73

Shakespeare

(3)

ENG 122

Love in World Literature

(3)

ENG 123

Women's Voices in Literature

(3)

ENG 124

Fiction to Film

(3)

ENG 126

The American Experience

(3)

ENG 129

Ethnic Lit. in America

(3)

ENG 130

Faith and Fiction

(3)

ENG 131

Russian Literature

(3)

ENG 135

Classic Films as Visual Literature

(3)

ENG 156H

The Modern Temper

(3)

ENG 164

American Drama

(3)

ENG 165

Novels of the Americas: Latino Voices

(3)

ENG 173

Shakespeare

(3)

C. History

HIS 1AB

Western Civilization

(3,3)

HIS 3/103

World History

(3)

HIS 5H

European Leaders and Ideas in Ferment and Flux

(3)

HIS 6/106

American Cultural History

(3)

HIS 25

Cultural and Historical Geography

(3)

HIS 45/145

Europe:Renaissance to the Enlightenment 1300-1789 (3)

 

HIS 46/146

Europe: Age of Revolution and Nationalism, 1789-1871 (3)

 

HIS 47/147

Europe: 1871-1945

(3)

HIS 50/150

Introduction to Asian History

(3)

HIS 75

Contemporary America

(3)

HIS 112/112H

Economic History of Europe

(3)

HIS 115AB

History of Political Theory

(3,3)

HIS 116

Classical Civilization

(3)

HIS 118

The World of Medieval Europe

(3)

HIS 171

The U.S. From Colony to Republic

(3)

HIS 173

The U.S. in the Nineteenth Century

(3)

HIS 175

The U. S. in the 20th Century

(3)

HIS 179

Constitutional History of the U.S.

(3)

HIS 180

Current Constitutional History

(3)

HIS 181

Modern Presidential History

(3)

HIS 184

Radicalism and Dissent

(3)

HIS 185A

African American History: American Slavery, 1619-1865

(3)

HIS 185B

African American History: Emancipation to Modern Era

(3)

HIS 185C/H

Race and Racism in American Life and Thought

(3)

HIS 191

Major Issues in US Women's History

(3)

POL 2

Comparative Government and Politics

(3)

POL 108

American Constitutional Law

(3)

POL 109

Individual Rights

(3)

POL 117AB

History of Political Theory

(3,3)

POL 152A

History of Modern Japan

(3)

POL 152B

History of Modern China

(3)

D. Natural and Physical Sciences

BIO 1AB

Biological Dynamics

(4,4)

BIO 3/103

General Microbiology

(4)

BIO 5

Life Science

(3)

BIO 10

Health Science

(3)

BIO 40A

Human Anatomy

(4)

BIO 50A

Human Anatomy

(4)

BIO 50B

Human Physiology

(4)

BIO 67/167

Environmental Science

(3)

CHE 1A/1AL

General Chemistry/Laboratory

(3,1)

CHE 3

Foundations of Chemistry

(3)

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

PHS 2AB

General Physical Science

(4)

PHS 4

Elementary Environmental Studies

(3)

PHY 1A

Introductory Physics

(4)

PHY 11A

Mechanics

(4)

E. Mathematics

BUS 28

Mathematical Analysis for Business

(3)

BUS 38

Elements of Probability and Statistics

(3)

MTH 1

College Algebra and Trigonometry

(4)

MTH 5A

Calculus I

(4)

MTH 5B

Calculus II

(4)

MTH 10

Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematical Ideas

(3)

MTH 20

Programming

(3)

MTH 28

Mathematical Analysis for Business

(3)

MTH 38/H

Elements of Probability and Statistics

(3)

MTH 50

Elementary Number Systems

(3)

MTH 51

Elements of Geometry and Statistics

(3)

PSY 40

Basic Statistical Methods

(3)

F. Social and Behavioral Sciences

ECO 1

Microeconomics

(3)

ECO 112/112H

World Economic History

(3)

POL 2

Introduction to World Politics

(3)

PSY 1

General Psychology

(3)

PSY 12/102

Child/Human Development

(3)

SOC 5

Sociological Perspectives

(3)

SOC 6

The Family, Child and Community

(3)

SOC 104

The Family

(3)

SOC 195

Sociology of Religion

(3)

G. Contemporary Economics or Politics

BUS 5

Business Law I

(3)

BUS 133

Money, Politics and Business

(3)

BUS 140

Women's Issues in Business and Economics

(3)

ECO 2

Macroeconomics

(3)

ECO 195

International Economics

(3)

HIS 75

Contemporary America

(3)

HIS 178

Diplomatic History of the United States

(3)

HIS 179

Constitutional History of the United States

(3)

HIS 180

Current Constitutional History

(3)

HIS 188

California History

(3)

LWS 111

Women's Issues in Business and Economics

(3)

POL 1

American Government and Institutions

(3)

POL 5

Business Law I

(3)

POL 102

Women and the Law

(3)

POL 108

American Constitutional Law

(3)

POL 109

Individual Rights

(3)

POL 125

Foreign Relations of the U. S.

(3)

POL 131

International Relations

(3)

POL 134

International Organizations-MUN

(3)

POL 135

Selected Problems in International Organizations (3)

 

POL 137

Ethnic Conflict and Civil War

(3)

POL 171/H

President's and Personality

(3)

POL 179

California Politics

(3)

POL 180

State and Local Government

(3)

POL 192

Plays and Politics

(3)

Language & Culture - GS IV:

Required for B. A. degree only.

FRE 1

Elementary French I (or equivalent)

(4)

FRE 2

Elementary French II (or equivalent)

(4)

FRE 3

Intermediate French III

(3)

FRE 4

Intermediate French IV

(3)

FRE 33A/B

French Culture and Civilization
Weekend College only

(3)

JPN 1

Elementary Japanese I (or equivalent)

(4)

JPN 2

Elementary Japanese II (or equivalent)

(4)

SPA 1

Elementary Spanish I (or equivalent)

(4)

SPA 2

Elementary Spanish II (or equivalent)

(4)

SPA 3A

Accelerated Spanish

(3)

SPA 3B

Intermediate Spanish III

(3)

SPA 4

Intermediate Spanish

(3)

SPA 33A

Civilizations and Cultures of Spain
Weekend College only

(3)

SPA 33B

Civilizations and Cultures of Hispanic America
Weekend College only

(3)

B.S. degree programs do not require a second language because of the additional science courses required by the related departments or outside professional accrediting agencies.

All students are strongly encouraged to take a second modern language to enhance their personal and professional communication in our current multilingual society.

Philosophy and Religious Studies - GS V:

(minimum 15 units* - must include 3 units of Ethics and 3 units of Philosophical Ideas.)

A. Religious Studies (6-9 units)

Ordinarily courses must be taken in at least two of the following areas:

1. Scripture

RST 11

Introduction to Hebrew Scriptures

(3)

RST 15

Introduction to Christian Scripture

(3)

2. Christian Thought

RST 21

Introduction to Catholicism

(3)

RST 23

Spiritual Journeys of Women

(3)

RST 25/125

Marriage Issues: Catholic Perspectives

(3)

RST 70

Faith and Human Development

(3)

RST 131

Jesus

(3)

RST 135

Women and Christianity

(3)

RST 137

Challenges in Contemporary Theology

(3)

3. Christian Ethics

RST 41

Introduction to Christian Ethics

(3)

RST 45/145

Contemporary Issues in Christian Ethics

(3)

RST 49/149

Biomedical Issues in Christian Ethics

(3)

RST 146

The Catholic Justice and Peace Tradition

(3)

4. Religion and Religions

RST 61/161

Introduction to World Religions

(3)

PHI 160

Philosophy of Religion

(3)

RST 78/178

Death and Afterlife

(3)

RST 172

Jesus & the Buddha

(3)

SOC 195

Sociology of Religion

(3)

B. Philosophy (6-9 units)

At least one course from among those listed under Philosophical Ideas must be taken.

1. Philosophical Ideas

PHI 15

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

PHI 24

Socrates, Plato, Aristotle

(3)

PHI 126

Descartes to Kant

(3)

PHI 130

Existentialism

(3)

PHI 134

American Philosophy

(3)

PHI 150

Metaphysics

(3)

PHI 152

Theory of Knowledge

(3)

PHI 158

The Scientific Method

(3)

PHI 160

Philosophy of Religion

(3)

PHI 162

Philosophy & Native Cultures

(3)

PHI 165

Philosophy & Law

(3)

PHI 167

Ethics and Film

(3)

PHI 169

Philosophy of Technology

(3)

PHI 170

Social and Political Philosophy

(3)

PHI 172

Marxism

(3)

PHI 174

Philosophy of Art

(3)

PHI 175

Philosophy of Film

(3)

PHI 176

Philosophy in Literature

(3)

PHI 178

Philosophy of Woman

(3)

PHI 179

Women and Values

(3)

PHI 180

Chinese Philosophy

(3)

2. Ethics

PHI 21

Moral Values

(3)

PHI 92/192

Business Ethics

(3)

PHI 167

Ethics & Film

(3)

PHI 168A

Contemporary Moral Problems

(3)

PHI 168B

Bioethics

(3)

PHI 179

Women and Values

(3)

3. Other

PHI 5

Introduction to Logic

(3)

PHI 10

Critical Thinking

(3)

PHI 155

Symbolic Logic

(3)

PHI 158

The Scientific Method

(3)

*Students transferring into the College who will graduate in two years or less will fulfill General Studies V., A and B, by completing two courses in each area, a total of twelve (12) units; one course must be Ethics and one must be Philosophical Ideas.

Diversity (6) - GS VI:

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

ART 173

Multiculturalism and the Visual Arts

(3)

BUS 140/140H

Women's Issues in Business and Economics

(3)

BUS 189

International Management

(3)

CUL 107

Theory and Practice of Culture

(3)

ENG 123

Women's Voices in Literature

(3)

ENG 126

The American Experience

(3)

ENG 129

Ethnic Literatures of America

(3)

FRE 4

Intermediate French

(3)

FRE 128

Twentieth Century Literary Trends

(3)

HIS 25

Cultural and Historical Geography

(3)

HIS 162

History & Civilization of Latin America

(3)

MUS 6M/106

Varieties of Music

(3)

NUR 160

Adaptation Nursing: Childbearing Family

(2.5)

PHI 15

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

PHI 21

Moral Values and Ethical Decisions

(3)

PHI 92/192

Business Ethics

(3)

PHI 160

Philosophy of Religion

(3)

PHI 162

Philosophy and Native Cultures

(3)

PHI 168A

Contemporary Moral Problems

(3)

PHI 174

Philosophy of Art

(3)

PHI 175

Philosophy of Film

(3)

PHI 176

Philosophy in Literature

(3)

PHI 178

Philosophy of Woman

(3)

PHI 179

Women and Values

(3)

POL 2

Introduction to World Politics

(3)

POL 192

Plays and Politics

(3)

PSY 113

Learning in Children and Adolescents Across Cultures(3)

 

PSY 144

Psychology of Prejudice

(3)

RST 61/161

Introduction to World Religions

(3)

RST 78/178

Death and Afterlife

(3)

RST 172

Jesus and the Buddha

(3)

SOC 5

Sociological Perspectives

(3)

SOC 6

The Family, Child, and Community

(3)

SOC 49

Multicultural Issues for Health Care Professionals

(3)

SOC 104

The Family

(3)

SOC 125

Cultural Anthropology

(3)

SOC 161

Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations

(3)

SPA 4

Intermediate Spanish IV

(3)

SPA 33B

Civilizations and Cultures of Hispanic America

(3)

SPA 140

Contemporary Literature of Hispanic America

(3)

SPA 146

Women in Hispanic Literature

(3)

Quantitative Literacy (6 units) - GS VII:

Baccalaureate students must take six (6) units of Quantitative Literacy (QL). The six units must come from either two QL2 courses OR one QL1 course and one QL2 course, but NOT two QL1 courses.

A. QL1

BIO 1A & 1AL

Biological Dynamics with lab

(4)

BIO 1A & 1AH

Biological Dynamics with honors lab

(5)

BIO 130

Genetics

(4)

BIO 151

Medical Physiology

(4)

BUS 15AB

Accounting Principles I,II

(3)

BUS 16AB

Accounting Principles I,II

(4)

CHE 107

Biochemistry

(3)

MTH 50

Elementary Numbers

(3)

NUR 51

Nursing Practicum: Adult

(0.5)

NUR 61

Nursing Practicum: Adult

(0.5)

NUR 138

Research in Nursing

(3)**

NUR 162

Adaptation Nursing: Children

(3)**

PHI 5

Introduction to Logic

(3)

PHI 165

Philosophy and Law

(3)

PHS 2

General Physical Sciences

(3)

PSY 106/L

Basic Research Methods

(4)

SOC 117

Quantitative Research Methods

(3)

**Note: These courses satisfy one QL unit. Students will need two more QL1 units.

B. QL2

CHE 1AB

General Chemistry

(3,3)

CHE 107L

Biochemistry Laboratory

(1)

CHE 110AB

Physical Chemistry

(4,3)

MTH 1

College Algebra and Trigonometry

(4)

MTH 5ABC

Calculus I/II/III

(4,4,4)

MTH 10

Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematical Ideas

(3)

MTH 28

Mathematical Analysis for Business

(3)

MTH 38

Elements of Probability and Statistics

(3)

MTH 51

Elements of Geometry and Statistics

(3)

MTH 120

Discrete Mathematics

(3)

PHI 155

Symbolic Logic

(3)

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

PHY 1AB

Introductory Physics

(4,3)

PHY 11A

Mechanics

(4)

PHY 11B

Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics

(3)

POL 101

Research Methodology

(3)

PSY 40

Basic Statistical Methods

(3)

Double Counting Courses

A course must have received a General Studies designation from the Curriculum Committee for the area(s) for which it might be double counted to fulfill General Studies requirements.

The following conditions apply to double counting:

  1. A course may not fulfill more than one category in Area III. At most six units of the 21 unit minimum in Area III may be double counted in other General Studies areas.
  2. With the exception of Phi 5 and Phi 10, no course from Areas I through IV may double count to satisfy a requirement in Area V.
  3. When completing a double major, no more than 9 upper division units may be double counted to satisfy requirements for both majors.

Triple Counting Courses

The following conditions apply to double or triple counting of a General Studies course:

  1. A course may not fulfill more than one category in Area III.
  2. With the exception of PHI 5 and PHI 10, no course from Areas I-IV may double count to satisfy a requirement in Area V.
  3. When completing a double major, no more than 9 upper division units may be double counted to satisfy requirements for both majors.

Please note: This policy thus allows a course to double or triple count in Areas I, II, IV, and VI. Only Phi 5 and Phi 10 double count to satisfy Area V. This means, for example, that Phi 10 double counts as Critical Thinking (Area II) and Philosophy (Area V), Phi 155 double counts as Philosophy (Area V) and QL2 (Area VI) and Phi 5 triple counts (as Critical Thinking (Area II) as Philosophy (Area V), and as QL1 (Area VII).  To determine if a course double or triple counts, focus on Areas 1, II, IV, V, and VI (all Areas EXCEPT Area III, which does not allow double counting).

Language Fulfillment Alternative

This requirement may be satisfied by any of the following alternatives:

  1. A student who begins a language must complete French 1 and 2, Japanese 1 and 2, or Spanish 1 and 2, or their equivalent. For other languages, students must complete the equivalent of the second semester or third quarter.
  2. Weekend College students may choose to complete the language requirement by taking two courses in either Spanish or French culture.
  3. Students whose native language is not English may demonstrate academic proficiency in English as a second language by passing the TOEFL examination with scores above 550.
  4. Students may take placement exams offered by MSMC's Language and Culture Department in Spanish, French or Japanese to fulfill the requirement. Successful completion will waive the Modern Language Requirement but no units will be awarded.

Graduating with a Double Major

Students who wish to earn a degree with a double major must observe the following requirements:

  1. The two majors may be in the same or different degree programs. The student must determine the primary major and satisfy the general studies requirement for the degree of that major. The other major is considered the secondary major.
  2. All requirements for both majors must be met, including all upper division work, foreign language, and any additional requirements.
  3. The department chairpersons of both major areas must approve the student's completion of the requirements for the major.
  4. A second major may be earned in the same academic area, but no more than 9 upper division units may satisfy requirements in both majors.

Second Baccalaureate

In order to receive a second Baccalaureate degree, a student must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester units in residence beyond the requirements for the first baccalaureate degree.
  2. Completion of all departmental requirements, including a modern language if necessary, in the area of the major for the second degree.
  3. Completion of all other institutional requirements if the first degree has been earned elsewhere.

Minor Policy

A minor should enrich a student's major, allow for specialization within a major, broaden a student's career options, and encourage exposure to other academic disciplines. While most disciplines require 18 units to complete a minor, some departments require additional units. In addition to the requirements for individual academic disciplines, a student must complete three upper division courses (9 units) for a minor that are not also being used to fulfill requirements for the major, general studies, or another minor. The deadline for declaring a minor will be the end of the student's junior year.

Graduation with Honors (Baccalaureate Degree)

  • Summa cum laude shall be granted to a student who has earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher.
  • Magna cum laude shall be granted to a student who has earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.7 or higher.
  • Cum laude shall be granted to a student who has earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher.

The College's criteria for eligibility to graduate with honors will be determined by a student's overall GPA at the end of the term prior to the last term of attendance. To be eligible, the student must have completed 45 letter-graded units at Mount St. Mary's College by the end of the term prior to the last term of attendance. The student's grade point average will be calculated on the basis of grades earned at Mount St. Mary's College and grades earned at transfer institutions. Courses at another institution after matriculation are not counted into the cumulative grade point average, with the exception of approved junior year abroad and exchange programs.

The Honors Program

The Honors Program at Mount St. Mary's College is designed to offer special challenges to students who have an outstanding high school GPA and SAT scores and/or who maintain a 3.4 or better cumulative college GPA.

The Honors Program enables students to explore in greater depth and breadth various areas of study, with possibilities of completing their college work with alternative modes and approaches to learning. Students may select among courses specially designed for the Honors Program, honors sections of regularly offered courses, and courses or course components designed by contract with an instructor. All honors courses are designated with the letter "H" following the course number.

Honors students may take as many honors courses as they choose. An honors certificate is awarded at graduation to students who have completed a minimum of 18 units of honors work, including at least two regularly scheduled honors courses, and representing at least three disciplines. Included in the 18 units of honors work required for the certificate is a senior thesis which is a major research project of the student's choosing, involving at least two disciplines. The thesis work is supervised by two faculty sponsors. Presentation of the senior thesis is open to the college community.

Academic Support Services

Academic Advisement Center and Services

The Chalon campus advisement program is coordinated through the Academic Advisement Center. All students are assigned a Faculty Advisor with whom they plan their academic programs. The advisor assists in clarifying the requirements in the general studies program and major department. Students meet with their advisor at least once each semester to register for classes. Entering students meet with a Faculty Advisor, are advised and registered at Orientation for their first semester at the Mount. Placement testing sessions are held during the month of June, and Orientation is held in July for all new freshmen and transfers. Out-of-area students are advised by the Advisement Center via e-mail and phone. Information regarding Orientation is sent to new students after tuition deposits have been made. Students entering in the Spring semester should contact the Advisement Center for registration and placement testing information.

To further serve the student's advisement needs, the Academic Advisement Center functions as a drop-in office for on-going guidance and referral services. Help in understanding and following college policies is always available. The staff, along with student assistants, provides information on many aspects of college life and can clarify many academic procedures. Although the individual faculty advisors and the Advisement Center staff make every effort to provide advisement for the student, it is ultimately the student's responsibility to see that all procedures are followed and requirements fulfilled.

Library Facilities

The Charles Willard Coe Memorial Library, located on the Chalon Campus, is the principal library of Mount St. Mary's College. Constructed in 1947, the Coe Library houses the majority of print library materials for both campuses and also houses the Instructional Media Center, an Office of Institutional Technology (OIT), administered repository for non-print media, and the hardware necessary to non-print media use. The facility is intended primarily for individual and small group use but also circulates its sound and image collections for use in the classroom. There is an OIT administered computer lab on the 4th floor.

The J. Thomas McCarthy Library on the Doheny Campus is housed in the Sr. Magdalen Coughlin Learning Complex.

The libraries serving the two campuses currently hold over 130,000 volumes and carry subscriptions to over 800 print periodicals. Moreover, the OIT administered IMTC contains over 5500 titles of non-print media material. Print and non-print materials are lent from one library to the other to accommodate the changing curriculum and to meet the needs of faculty and students, who are also permitted to use both collections in person. The libraries hold subscriptions to a number of bibliographic and full-text on-line databases in a wide variety of academic subject areas. There are three book databases as well as numerous journal article and proprietary materials databases. Please consult the Libraries' Research Resources WebPages for a list of current subscriptions.

Study Away/ Study Abroad Opportunities

As a traditional liberal arts college, Mount St. Mary's recognizes the value of the study away experience. Students who participate are given the opportunity to gain knowledge and cultural awareness as an integral part of their liberal arts education. The Mount allows qualified students to participate in four approved programs. The study away programs are the Washington Semester Program, the Sisters of St. Joseph College Consortium Exchange (CSJ Exchange), and the BorderLinks program. A study abroad opportunity is available through the American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS). Each program provides students with unique and valuable experiences at other institutions while earning Mount credit.

Qualified students may study in one of these programs for one semester in their junior or senior year. The minimum GPA requirement to participate is a cumulative 3.0. Students may pick up applications and course information in the Advisement Center. Students interested in studying away/abroad must attend a mandatory information session during the semester prior to their desired semester away/abroad. The institutional deadlines to file an application and a Transfer of Credit form are April 1, for Fall semester, and November 1, for Spring semester. All students who study away must obtain approval from the Chalon Advisement Center in order to be eligible for financial aid. Finally, students who participate in one of these programs must attend a pre-departure session.

Mount St. Mary's College encourages students to participate in the Study Away/Abroad Program. Students must complete the appropriate academic year Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and have the information sent to Mount St. Mary's College as well as the Aid Renewal Request Form. Study Away/Abroad students must follow the same deadlines as students not participating in the program. Students must provide the Office of Student Financing with a breakdown of costs for their semester. They will be reviewed as a "resident" student and their cost of housing will be taken into consideration during the analysis of their file. Study Away students do not qualify for Federal Work Study or Mount Work funds while away, but may be awarded work monies when they return to campus. If a student receives any type of outside award, including a scholarship or stipend from their Study Away/Abroad program, they must report it to the Office of Student Financing so it can be considered in the evaluation of their aid. Any questions regarding funding of Study Away programs should be directed to the Office of Student Financing.

The GPA earned by a student on these programs is included in the student's overall GPA, and is also used for the conferral of honors at graduation. Each program may have additional requirements. Please consult the Advisement Center for more information.

American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS)

Mount St. Mary's College offers students the opportunity to study abroad with the American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS). AIFS has programs in the following countries: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Czech Republic, England, France, Holland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and Spain. Most countries provide students with intensive language classes and each has specific requirements regarding language fluency.

There is a variety of courses offered in this program. Most courses are in the humanities and social science areas. Biology, Biochemistry, and Chemistry majors will find an assortment of science and math courses offered in London, England. England also offers a variety of internships for qualified students. For more information visit: www.aifsabroad.com.

Washington Semester

Mount St. Mary's College is affiliated with the American University in Washington, DC, making it possible for Mount students to spend a semester in the nation's capitol and pursue study in one of eleven areas: American Politics, Economic Policy, Foreign Policy, International Business & Trade, International Environmental & Development, Justice, Justice: Law Enforcement, Peace & Conflict Resolution, Print & Broadcast Journalism, Public Law, and Transforming Communities. To participate in the program students must be nominated by a full-time faculty member in their major department. Since a major portion of a Washington semester consists of internship experience, students who study in Washington are not normally permitted to enroll in additional internship units. For more information visit: www.washingtonsemester.com.

Sisters of St. Joseph College Consortium (SSJCC) Exchange

Mount St. Mary's College is one of twelve Sisters of St. Joseph Colleges. The consortium agreement allows students from the Mount to attend any of the other schools for one semester. The member schools are: Aquinas Junior College at Milton (MA), Avila College (MO), Chestnut Hill College (PA), Elms College (MA), Fontbonne College (MO), Mater Dei College (NY), Nazareth College (NY), Regis College (MA), The College of St. Catherine (MN), The College of St. Joseph (VT), and The College of Saint Rose (NY). The SSJCC Student Exchange Program allows students to take advantage of the rich learning experience of being with students from a different part of the country on a campus with unique academic resources. Each school offers students an enriching learning opportunity as well as increased exposure to faculty specialists and curricula.

Border Links

Mount St. Mary's College is affiliated with BorderLinks, a semester on the border program. The BorderLinks experience is more than academic; it offers students a dynamic experiential learning experience and community living along the U.S. Mexico border in Tucson, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora. The main focus of the program is to enlighten students on the impact of globalization. Available to students on the program are the following courses: Liberation Theology, Culture of the Borderlands, Peace and Justice Studies, History of Mexico, and Spanish Language courses. For more information visit: www.borderlinks.org.

UCLA Cross-Registration Agreement

Mount St. Mary's College has a cross-registration agreement with the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), the purpose of which is to supplement and enrich the MSMC academic program and to provide an opportunity for UCLA students to take Mount courses. Full-time Mount baccalaureate students who have sophomore, junior, or senior standing and a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or better may, with the permission of the College Registrar, take one undergraduate course at UCLA per semester, but no more than four courses toward the degree. No more than two such courses will count toward the MSMC residency requirement; courses taken at UCLA must not be among those available at MSMC. Courses taken at UCLA under this arrangement will be included in the student's load at the College, and, except for specific course laboratory or studio fees, no additional tuition or fees will be charged. Transportation to such courses and parking fees are the responsibility of the student enrolled. For information and procedures, consult the Office of the Registrar on the Chalon campus.

University of Judaism (UJ) Cross-Registration Agreement

Mount St. Mary's College has a cross-registration agreement with the University of Judaism, the purpose of which is to supplement and enrich the MSMC academic program and to provide an opportunity for UJ students to take Mount courses. The following conditions and requirements must be met:

  • The student must meet all prerequisites/criteria required for courses.
  • No visiting student may displace a student from the registration of a course at the student's home institution.
  • The student is responsible for obtaining all appropriate signatures and returning the completed form to the student's home institution.
  • The student is responsible for meeting all registration deadlines, regulations, and penalties of MSMC.

A student who wishes to withdraw from a course(s) must notify the Registrar at both MSMC and UJ. Students who do not formally withdraw will receive a grade of U or F.

Student Affairs

Mount St. Mary's College provides students with programs and experiences conducive to personal, cultural, ethical, social, physical, spiritual, and intellectual growth. Student initiative and responsibility are encouraged in an atmosphere of close interrelation among students, faculty, administration and staff.

Campus Ministry

Campus Ministry Office seeks to develop and sustain awareness of the spiritual dimension of life which is at the heart of the College's mission, assisting students, faculty, and staff to grow spiritually in accordance with their own religious traditions. Catholic in our roots and vision, we welcome the opportunity to be of service to persons of every religious persuasion or none at all, and commit ourselves to respect the freedom of each person's conscience and unique path.

The Campus Ministry team consists of a director, two coordinators (each focused on one of our two campuses), student coordinators and office staff. Together, they are responsible for a number of areas: Liturgy (including Sunday Mass, reconciliation services and other prayer services); the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults (for those who wish to become Catholic); preparation for Confirmation, Eucharist and other sacraments; Bible Study and other educational efforts; retreats; campus festivities and observances; and community service opportunities, including action for social justice. Individual counseling and conversations are also available to any member of the campus community.

The Mary Chapel, located in the heart of the campus, is the central place for worship and prayer at Chalon, and people of all faith backgrounds are welcome there, whether for a Sunday evening Mass, a Noon Prayer service, a Rosary with friends, or for personal quiet reflection.

Career Services

Career Services provides students with the opportunity for individual counseling to assist with skills assessment, resume writing, interviewing techniques, and information regarding graduate studies. Professional staff members are available to help students research information on career positions, as well as internship and volunteer options. In addition, the Career Services staff fosters on-going relationships with a variety of organizations and corporations in order to develop internship and employment opportunities for students.

A variety of events are offered through Career Services. Annual events include an etiquette dinner, a major options workshops series, on-campus career fairs, and a faculty panel discussion addressing graduate studies. Alumnae career panels focusing on different majors and occupations are held throughout the school year. All students are encouraged to enroll in the one unit Career Planning Seminar course that is required for business majors, or the Career Exploration course designed for undeclared or major changers.

Career Services maintains several web-based resources including the Mount Career Network. This on-line job posting system provides students with access to full-time and part-time job listings, as well as volunteer and internship opportunities. Additional resources include an on-campus career resource library consisting of books on interviewing, resume writing, major and career options, job search, and graduate/professional school information and preparation.

Service Learning and Community Engagement

In the spirit of the mission and strategic planning of Mount St. Mary's College, community engagement opportunities exist to offer MSMC students off-campus service and learning experiences at community organizations that promote human and community development. Service-Learning faculty, Career Services staff, the Women's Leadership Program, and the office of Community Engagement work collaboratively with MSMC students to promote healthy, socially-just communities in the greater Los Angeles area. In order to gain knowledge and understanding, assess their own learning through reflection and structured experiences, and become life-long committed advocates for social justice in our world, all Mount students are encouraged to participate in a variety of community engagement and service-learning opportunities.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS)

MSMC recognizes that emotional health and personal growth are essential components of a successful academic experience. The mission of Counseling and Psychological Services is to enhance the emotional growth of students by promoting balanced lifestyles, positive self-esteem and essential life skills with an emphasis on the development of the whole person. CPS provides psychological counseling services and psychoeducational programs for students, as well as responsive consultation to the college community. In counseling, students discuss issues such as stress, anxiety, depression, academic concerns, family and relationship problems, grief, loneliness, eating issues, alcohol/drug problems, dating violence and self-esteem difficulties. Counseling services are available to current MSMC full-time traditional undergraduates, accelerated nursing students, and physical therapy graduate students. After the initial appointment, a recommendation will be made for individual counseling, group sessions, or referrals to services in the community. Our counseling is short-term, not to exceed twelve sessions per academic year as determined by your counselor. It may be in the best interest of the client to receive long-term therapy, specialized treatment or other referrals; in these cases, students will be referred out to services in the community.

All sessions are confidential in keeping with professional ethics and state laws. Information about clients is not shared with their families, the faculty, college administrators, or anyone else without the student's written permission. The exception to this policy is when limited disclosure is required by law to protect the student or someone else from harm. Counseling and Psychological Services is staffed by licensed psychologists, advanced doctoral level interns, and postdoctoral fellows.

Disability Services

Please see Disability Policy under the Undergraduate Academic Policies for additional information.

Fitness Education

Mount St. Mary's College is committed to graduating well-balanced women with a strong sense of self and physical well being. The Fitness Education Department offers programs that complement the academic program: the physical education courses offered for academic credit, fitness programs, recreational opportunities and an intramural sports program. These programs together provide students with the opportunity to attain, improve and/or maintain their physical fitness, attend informative workshops on wellness and fitness, participate in recreational activities on or off the campus, and participate in intramural volleyball, basketball, indoor soccer, dodgeball and more. Facilities include a heated swimming pool, fitness center equipped with cardiovascular and strength training equipment, and a tennis-basketball-volleyball court.

Institute for Student Academic Enrichment (ISAE)

ISAE is a federally funded Student Support Services/TRIO program designed to assist first-generation, low-income and/or disabled students in achieving their maximum potential in higher education. ISAE provides eligible students academic advisement, peer tutoring and mentoring, career and personal counseling, financial aid information, workshops and leadership and cultural enrichment opportunities. ISAE is located in the Chalon Learning Center.

Learning Assistance Programs / Learning Center

In order to enable each student to achieve maximum benefit from the academic programs at the College, Learning Assistance Programs offers a variety of academic support services for all MSMC students. Services include peer tutoring in all subject areas, workshops in study and organizational skills, structured study groups, writing and analytical skill development, and books and computer tutorials to assist in developing skills to prepare for standardized graduate examinations. Learning Assistance Programs is located in the Chalon Learning Center, Humanities Bldg., Rm. 207.

Orientation / First-Year Seminar

The Orientation program is designed to assist entering students with their transition to Mount St. Mary's College and to enhance their success in college. Separate orientation programs specifically designed for new and transfer students are held in the summer. Orientation includes an introduction to both the academic and student life aspects of the college and provides for the interaction of new students with faculty, staff, and current students. Orientation for new first-year students is held in July with separate activities for parents. Orientation activities include a movie night and service-learning project. In addition, placement testing, advisement, and course registration are available. Students entering for the spring semester are provided a one-day orientation program.

First-year students continue their orientation to the college in SPR 85 (Introduction to College Studies), a one-unit seminar course taught in the fall semester. This class is designed to facilitate the transition from high school to the college environment and provides opportunities to become more familiar with college resources, policies and procedures, study skills, and other strategies for college success.

Residence Life

Living on at Mount St. Mary's Chalon and Doheny campus can be an enjoyable experience, providing a unique opportunity for individual and group participation in residence hall life. Living and learning occur throughout the residence hall system and life in the halls complements the academic life of the classroom. Living in the Residence Halls provides opportunities to participate in many activities. A variety of programs and services will be available to you, allowing you to develop personally, spiritually, intellectually, socially, and culturally. Only full-time traditional undergraduates may live in undergraduate housing.

Student residence life is largely self-regulated, under the direction of the Residence Life Staff composed of the Director, Assistant Directors, Administrative Assistant, Graduate Housing Coordinator, Head Resident Assistants and Resident Assistants.

For more detailed information on Residence Life guidelines, see the Student Handbook.

An off-campus housing referral listing is available through the Student Activities and Commuter Services Office.

Scholar Mentor Program

President's Scholars, Dean's List students, and others recommended by their professors may participate in the Scholar Mentor Program. Through this program students are trained as peer tutors and provide tutoring to other Mount students in a variety of subjects. Scholar Mentors may receive academic credit by enrolling in the Scholar Mentor Seminar (SPR 25). In addition, they may earn compensation for training and tutoring hours.

Short Term Loans

Two short-term loans are available to full-time, traditional undergraduate students. Please see details below for each loan.

Academic Emergency Loan: This loan is available during the first two weeks of each semester to current, full time, traditional undergraduate students holding 12 units or more to assist them with academic expenses. Students may borrow up to $150 per semester through this loan for academic expenses only (such as books). Applications are available at the Student Affairs Office, H200. Applications will be reviewed by a loan officer and a meeting may be required. Applications may take up to 2 business days to be processed.

The Nancy Manning Emergency Loan: This loan is available to students enrolled at the Chalon campus who have attended classes for one semester. This loan is granted to students in need of immediate assistance with educational, housing, transportation or medical expenses. Loans are available up to a maximum of $50 per semester and must be repaid within 30 days from date requested.

The Nancy Manning Loan is interest-free if repaid by the due date. Failure to repay the loan by the due date will result in a $5.00 late fee and interest at the rate of seven percent (7%) per annum thereafter. For further information, please stop by the Student Activities and Commuter Services Office, H110.

Student Activities and Commuter Services (SACS)

The Student Activities Office coordinates numerous co-curricular events, programs and activities on campus. SACS provides students of Mount St. Mary's College a variety of options for involvement through participation in student clubs, student government, and other leadership opportunities. It is a great resource for certifying organizations, planning events, fundraising and publicity for student organizations. Opportunities to explore the Los Angeles area is available through Weekend Programming and Ticket Office which offers discount tickets to movie theaters and themes parks.

The Associated Student Body is also housed in the SACS Office. ASB is the student governing body which is comprised of an Executive Board, the Senate, and the Student Activities Council. The Senate provides students with the opportunity to participate in various College committees and to play an important role in the College's decision making process. The Student Activities Council sponsors many campus-wide events such as Blood Drives, Charity Ball, Lighting of the Circle, and Spring Carnival.

Commuter students are an active and vital part of the Mount St. Mary's College community. SACS is dedicated to meeting the needs of commuter students by providing various programs and services. These services include off-campus housing referrals, lockers, a carpool program, designated carpool parking, Commuter Café, social events and fax service.

Student Ambassador Program

The Student Ambassador Program is one of MSMC's partnership programs designed to motivate inner-city high school students to complete high school and aspire to a college education. The ambassadors help high school students understand what skills they need to acquire and what courses to take to qualify for college admission, and assist them with identifying appropriate colleges to which they can apply, completing admissions applications and researching financial aid. The program provides leadership and service opportunities to Mount Students by engaging them in outreach in the Los Angeles area. Currently, ambassadors serve in 40 high schools, 5 middle schools, and several Los Angeles City housing developments. By helping these high school students to plan for college, improve study skills and envision satisfying and rewarding careers, Mount students are able to give back to the community while developing their own counseling and time-management skills. The Student Ambassador Program continues a long-standing Mount tradition of service to the local and world community.

Student Health Services

Mount St. Mary's College Health Services Department offers a broad range of services to both resident and commuter full-time students who pay the Comprehensive Student Fee. These services include diagnosis and treatment of illness and minor injuries, physical examinations, health teaching, and laboratory testing. The Health Clinic on the Chalon campus is staffed by nurse practitioners, nurses, and specially trained students. The Medical Director and physicians from the Peak Health Medical Group provide oversight, consultation and clinical review.

Emphasis is placed on preventive medicine and on positive health practices which will become a part of each student's lifestyle. Programs designed to assist students in developing values and skills related to achieving a high level of health are presented each semester.

Incoming freshmen and transfer students, both residents and commuters, must submit a current health history and physical examination prior to entrance. Proof of current immunizations and TB skin testing are also required for admission. Additional health requirements exist for students enrolled in programs with clinical affiliations.

Chalon students are eligible to use the Student Health Clinic on the Chalon or Doheny campuses. Appointments may be made with healthcare providers throughout the week. There is no cost to a student for provider visits; however, supplemental fees for laboratory testing and medications may be assessed. Referrals for specialty services and emergency services will be made through the Student Health Center.

When the Student Health Center is closed, a Medical Provider is on-call and available for consultation.

All full-time students are required to carry Health and Accident Insurance. Please see expense listings at the beginning of this catalog for additional information regarding health insurance available through Mount St. Mary's College.

Women’s Leadership Program

The Women's Leadership Program offers many opportunities for leadership skill building and development in order to prepare students as leaders in their communities and future careers. Students are encouraged to develop and strengthen their personal, team, group, and citizen leadership skills throughout their time at the Mount. The program supports students in developing leadership skills through co-curricular activities, workshops, internships, and participation in national conferences.

All MSMC students have the opportunity to document their co-curricular activities in the form of a Leadership Transcript. In addition, freshmen and sophomore students are can apply to be part of the Leadership Scholar Program. Students who are part of the program have opportunities to develop their leadership potential by taking courses and participating in group service projects and other developmental experiences.

The following courses in Leadership are taught by program staff:

LWS 1A & 1B: Introduction to Leadership Concepts – Year-long course/Fall & Spring

LWS 1C: Orientation Leader Training – Spring

LWS 5: Leadership in Action – Spring

Graduate Degrees

The liberal arts tradition and the Catholic nature of the College give direction to Mount St. Mary's College Graduate Division. Graduate programs flow from the College mission statement and presuppose the components of a liberal arts education, as is evident in the following objectives, developed by the Graduate Council for the teaching and preparation of students at the graduate level.

Women and men at the graduate level are prepared as leaders for society and are given the means, as well as the confidence, to:

  1. create and contribute to a society in which respect for individuals permeates all professional structures and personal interactions;
  2. assist those with whom they work to recognize and use their own talents, skills, and resources;
  3. envision and facilitate personal responsibility for the direction of society as it grows toward a greater global interaction, culturally, socially, and politically;
  4. expand one's own knowledge of and contribution to a field through the tools of research and academic development.

Each graduate program, in ways appropriate to the preparation for a particular profession, strives to attain these objectives by:

  1. individualized and personal advisement;
  2. careful curriculum planning and scheduling;
  3. selection of competent, caring faculty who are well prepared in their fields and sensitive to the needs of the adult student population;
  4. challenging students to investigate a wide range of related resources beyond those presented in classes;
  5. providing a welcoming environment that suggests harmony, peace and concern for the well-being of all persons.

Programs in the Graduate Division include disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and professional graduate degrees. Degree nomenclature appropriately reflects the type of degree.

Degrees Offered

Master of Business Administration

Master of Science in Education with concentrations in:

Elementary Education

Secondary Education

Special Education: Mild/Moderate Disability

Instructional Leadership

Individually Designed Program

(See Individually Designed Program)

Master of Arts in the Humanities with concentrations in:

English, History, Cultural Studies, and Creative Writing

(See Humanities Masters Degree)

Master of Science in Nursing

The Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) is conferred with a specialization in:

Educator

Leadership and Administration

Clinical Nurse Specialist-Adult Health

Community/Public Health

In addition, an ADN to MSN program is offered and a post-MSN Clinical Nurse Specialist certificate.

(See ADN-to-MSN Program)

Master of Science in Counseling Psychology with concentrations in:

Marriage, Family and Child Counseling

Community and Interpersonal Relations

(See Human Services and Community Counseling (Minimum 36-39 units required))

Psychology Certificates of Specialization:

Counseling the Spanish-Speaking Client

Pastoral Counseling Emphasis

(See Pastoral Counseling Emphasis)

Master of Arts in Religious Studies with Certificate Programs in:

Advanced Studies in Youth and Young Adult Ministry

(See Advanced Studies in Youth and Young Adult Ministry Certificate)

Doctor of Physical Therapy

(See Physical Therapy)

Graduate Admission Policies

A student who holds a bachelor's or higher degree from a regionally accredited college or university is eligible to apply for admission. The student's previous academic record must give evidence of the ability and the preparation necessary for successfully pursuing graduate study. Admission will be based on an evaluation of the applicant's potential for success in both the program and the profession.

Graduate Application Procedures

Applications, with all supporting documents, must be completed before or during the first semester of enrollment. (See application procedures for Doctor of Physical Therapy Admission)

The applicant forwards the following to:

The Office of Graduate Admission

Mount St. Mary's College

10 Chester Place

Los Angeles, CA 90007-2598

  1. Application and application fee.
  2. One official, sealed, transcript of all previous college work, both undergraduate and graduate, sent directly from each institution to the Office of Graduate Admission. These records should demonstrate a minimum GPA of 3.0 for applicants to all graduate programs.
  3. Letters of recommendation from persons who have had ample opportunity to judge the applicant's academic ability, achievement and professional potential. (Personal references from family members, close friends, and neighbors are discouraged.)
    1. For applicants for the M. A. in Religious Studies: Two letters from individuals who can assess potential for graduate study in theology and potential in counseling or religious leadership in parish or school.
    2. For applicants for the Master of Business Administration: Two letters from individuals who can assess appropriate professional potential for success in business.
    3. For applicants for the M. S. in Education: Two letters from individuals who can assess appropriate professional potential for teaching.
    4. For applicants for the M.S. in Counseling Psychology: Two letters from individuals who can assess appropriate professional potential as a counseling psychologist.
    5. For applicants for the Master of Science in Nursing and ADN to MSN: Two letters from individuals who can assess appropriate professional potential for success in advanced studies in nursing.
    6. For applicants for the Doctor of Physical Therapy: Three references are required—one academic, one from a physical therapist, and one from an individual who can assess the applicant's interpersonal skills.
  4. Statement of interest/application essay (see Graduate Application).
  5. Official scores of the Miller Analogies Test (Religious Studies) or the Graduate Record Exam (Psychology and Physical Therapy), or the Graduate Management Admission Test (Business), or the California Subject Examination for Teachers (Education).
  6. An Admission interview with graduate faculty.

Graduates of foreign universities at which English is not the primary language must:

  1. Submit results of the TOEFL test with required minimum score of 550.
  2. Have their transcripts sent to an approved credential evaluation service agency for equivalency evaluation.

International students must:

  1. Submit a notarized statement and supporting documents guaranteeing financial support during the period of study at Mount St. Mary's College.
  2. Submit a medical certificate.
  3. Complete necessary visa documents.

Further details are published in "Information for Prospective Graduate Students From Other Countries," included with the application forms.

Note: Exceptions to the requirements listed above may be requested by academic petition to the graduate advisor and Graduate Dean.

Admission and Acceptance

After all requirements for admission have been fulfilled, the application and supporting documents will be forwarded to the department housing the graduate program to which the applicant has applied. The evaluation process will be conducted by the Program Advisor or Director, Department Chair, Graduate Dean, and occasionally the Graduate Council.

A written decision of acceptance, conditional acceptance, or non-acceptance will be rendered on the Admission Evaluation Form. A copy of the form will be mailed to the applicant from the Graduate Division Office.

In the event that the applicant's undergraduate record does not include all the required courses or a satisfactory grade point average, supplementary undergraduate work may be required to fulfill the prerequisites of the major department.

After official acceptance into a graduate degree program, masters and doctoral degree students may apply for financial aid from the Student Financing Office of Mount St. Mary's College.

An applicant may complete up to 6 units in one semester at MSMC while applying for admission to a Graduate Program in the areas of Education and Humanities (see Non Degree-Seeking Graduate Students section). For Religious Studies requirements, see Graduate Religious Studies. Under certain circumstances a student may petition to complete an additional 3 units prior to the acceptance to any of these programs. No more than nine units taken at Mount St. Mary's College before acceptance into a program may be applied to the degree program. Enrollment in courses as a non-matriculating student is subject to the approval of the program advisor, director and/or the Graduate Dean. Permission to enroll under a non-matriculating status does not guarantee acceptance to a graduate program at Mount St. Mary's College.

Readmission Policy

A student wishing to return to the University after one year in which he or she was not enrolled must reapply for admission through the Graduate Admission Office and will be evaluated on the same conditions as all other new students.

Academic Policies for Graduate Division

Residence and Time Limit

After acceptance into a degree program the student is expected to remain continuously enrolled each regular semester up to and including the semester in which the degree is awarded. The degree must be earned within seven years after the first graduate level course is posted on the transcript. Note: courses applicable to credentials are subject to California Commission on Teacher Credentialing limitations.

A graduate student who is eligible but who chooses not to enroll continuously may petition for a leave of absence for a semester and may renew the leave for another semester but no more than three consecutive semesters. At the end of the period of leave, the student may enroll without filing an application for re-admission. After a lapse of time extending beyond the leave, the student will follow the same procedures as those for new applicants.

Thesis or Project Completion

If a student, after one semester enrollment in EDU 296B, HUM 296B, PSY 295 or 296, or RST 290 or 291, has not completed the project or thesis, the student will be required to enroll in a one-unit thesis project continuation course (EDU 297A,B,C; HUM 297A,B,C, PSY297A,B,C or RST 290A,B,Cor 291A) for the subsequent semesters until the thesis/project is completed. Once three project continuation courses are completed, no other options for completing the masters degree are available.

Unit Load

The number of semester units of work taken in the respective semester or summer session is determined in consultation with departmental advisors. The number of semester units for a full-time load is six (6) semester units.

Student Responsibility

Students are held individually responsible for information contained in the College catalog, Graduate Student Handbook, program handbooks, and College email correspondence. Failure to read and understand these policies and regulations will not excuse students from their observance. In addition they are responsible for the information contained in the official class schedules and other data sent or posted on the MSMC website by the Graduate Division Office. College catalogs are available in the Graduate Division Office, and students are advised to obtain and keep their catalogs.

Academic IntegrityGraduate students are expected to follow Mount St. Mary's policy regarding academic integrity. Plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty are treated as extremely serious violations of ethical conduct and may result in suspension or expulsion from the University. (See Catalog, Undergraduate Academic Policies, Academic Integrity section, page 36; and Graduate Student Handbook, Academic Integrity.)

Graduation

Application for Graduation: Candidates for the Masters and Doctoral degrees must file a formal degree application and pay the required fee at the beginning of their final semester. The specific date for this application is published in the current Academic calendar.

It is the responsibility of the student to apply for graduation. Graduation application forms are available in the Doheny Registrar's Office.

The graduation fee is required, in order for the degree to be awarded, regardless of attendance at the graduation ceremonies. Candidates should check with the appropriate program advisor or director to affirm that all requirements have been met.

Education Credential candidates are responsible for submitting Credential applications to the MSMC Department of Education for processing.

Graduation Exercises

Candidates receiving degrees are invited to participate in the graduation exercises. In order to participate in commencement exercises, students must be registered for all courses needed to complete degree and college requirements. These ceremonies are held each year at the end of the Spring semester. All graduates who have completed their programs since the previous Spring are included in these exercises.

Readmission of Students Who Have Already Completed a Graduate Degree

Graduates who wish to enroll for another credential or degree will follow the same procedure as new applicants. New recommendations and other records may be required, depending upon changed circumstances. An application fee is not charged unless a period of five or more years has elapsed since the completion of the previous program

Non Degree-Seeking Graduate Students (Non-Matriculating Status)

Students who hold a Baccalaureate degree from accredited colleges or universities are eligible to take courses for unit credit at the College without the intention of pursuing a graduate degree or credential. They may take either undergraduate courses in subjects of special interest or graduate courses for personal or professional development. Students complete an application and registration form and may be required to provide evidence of possessing a Baccalaureate degree at the time of registration. Their registration is approved by the program advisor. They are expected to observe all policies and procedures of the College while in attendance. If, after taking courses at the College, a student should become an applicant for a degree, a limited number of graduate credit courses (no more than nine units) may be applied to the individual degree program, after the student has been admitted to the Graduate Program. These courses must satisfy the requirements of the program and meet the approval of the program advisor/director and the Graduate Dean. Permission to enroll under a non-matriculating status does not guarantee acceptance to a graduate program at Mount St. Mary's College.

Course Numbers

Although all of the work counted toward a graduate degree is of a distinctly advanced character, not all of the courses need be taken from the 200-level. With the approval of the graduate advisor/director in the major field, upper division courses suitable for a well rounded program may be included, provided that the student earns at least a grade of B. A maximum of upper division units that may be included are nine semester units for the Master of Arts in Humanities and the Master of Science in Education degrees. Courses required for a Doctoral degree in Physical Therapy have 400-499 numbering.

Grading Policies

Once submitted, grades may not be changed unless the result of clerical or procedural error. A student must request a review/change within 30 days after the end of a semester, or within 30 days following the distribution of the grade report containing the grade which the student wishes to challenge. (See process in Graduate Handbook.)

Grades

The grade point average for all work presented for an advanced degree, credential, or certificate must be at least 3.0 or B average. A required course in which a grade of D or F has been received must be repeated. See specific program requirements for exceptions.

The student's grade point average is computed according to this scale:

A

4.0

A-

3.7

B +

3.3

B

3.0

B-

2.7

C +

2.3

C

2.0

C-

1.7

D

1.0

F

0.0

The following grades are not computed in the GPA:

AU

Audit

CR

Credit given (see below)

I

Incomplete (see below)

IP

In Progress: deferred grading for graduate thesis or field experience

NC

No Credit given (see below)

NG

No Grade received, issued by the Registrar pending receipt of the final grade

R

Course was Repeated at later date

U

Unauthorized withdrawal

W

Withdrawal

Credit/No Credit

CR/NC ordinarily applies only to the Supervised Field Experience in graduate programs. For field experiences, practica, and supervised teaching offered by the Education, Counseling Psychology, Nursing and Physical Therapy Departments, CR signifies B or better work.

Audit

The grading selection of Audit should be requested when a student wishes to preview a course for which he/she will be enrolled at a later date for a grade or to review a course that has already been successfully completed as preparation for further study, or for intellectual curiosity and enrichment. Auditors attend class sessions regularly but are not obligated to take examinations. They receive no credit for courses audited. Tuition is charged for courses taken as audit.

Incomplete

An Incomplete is given only when a student:

  • has fulfilled the majority of the course requirements,
  • has a passing grade in the classwork,
  • is prevented from completing the assigned work for serious reasons,
  • has consulted the instructor prior to the grading period, and
  • has been assessed by the instructor that he/she can realistically complete the work within one semester.

A student requesting an Incomplete must file a Petition for Incomplete with the signature of the instructor and the department chairperson prior to the day of the final exam. The instructor will assign a default grade when approving an incomplete. This default grade will be recorded on the student's transcript when a completed grade is not assigned by the instructor and/or an extension of the incomplete is not processed. An incomplete may only be extended for one additional semester with the approval of the instructor, the department chairperson, and the appropriate academic dean. (Students may not be given more than two semesters to complete any course.)

Repetition of courses

Only courses for which unacceptable grades have been assigned may be repeated for a higher grade or CR. (See specific program for definition of unacceptable grades.) Courses may be repeated only once. The units are counted only once and the higher grade computed in the GPA. A student must repeat required courses in which unacceptable grades were assigned if the student is eligible to remain in the program.

Transfer of Credit

A maximum of six semester units of graduate work taken in an accredited graduate program is transferable to Mount St. Mary's College provided that:

  • the transfer courses satisfy curriculum requirements at Mount St. Mary's College and a grade of B or better was earned;
  • the courses are transferred after the student has been accepted into the program and prior to the last semester of graduate study; transfer credit forms are available in the Graduate Office;
  • correspondence and extension courses are not transferable;
  • courses were taken within seven years of the date on which the student was accepted in a Mount St. Mary's College graduate program.

Once admitted to a graduate program students are expected to pursue study only at Mount St. Mary's College.

Credit by Exam

In selected departments, course credit by challenge examination is available on a limited basis and at the discretion of the department chairperson. The student must file the approved form in the Office of the Registrar. Only units of CREDIT will be awarded for these examinations (No record of failures will appear on a student's transcript.). All credit awarded in this manner will be so noted on the student's transcript. A course may be challenged by examination only once.

Unauthorized Withdrawal

The designation of Unauthorized Withdrawal (U) may, at the discretion of the instructor, be assigned in lieu of a grade of F, when the student does not attend a course but fails to officially withdraw, or does not attend a sufficient number of class meetings.

Withdrawal From Courses

The grade W indicates withdrawal from a course, according to the following policy:

Withdrawal (W) indicates that the student was permitted to withdraw from a class during the period scheduled on the College calendar with the approval of the instructor and advisor. After the scheduled date, a student may petition the Graduate Dean for an exception. The W carries no connotation of quality of student performance and is not calculated in the grade point average.

Withdrawal from Programs

When students withdraw from a graduate program, they must file a withdrawal notice in the Graduate Division Office.

Academic Probation

Failure of a graduate degree or credential student to maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA places the student on probation. The student will be notified in writing from the Office of the Graduate Dean regarding the probation. A student on probation must achieve a semester GPA of 3.0 or higher during the next two semesters in order to be reinstated to regular standing and may be required to take fewer units of work while on probation. See individual departments for specific probation policies.

Academic Dismissal

A student is subject to dismissal for failure to maintain a 3.0 GPA during the probationary period. Failure to comply with the requirements and regulations of the graduate program and College may also subject a student to dismissal. The Graduate Dean and/or the Graduate Council have the authority to dismiss students and to suspend dismissal.

Academic Petitions

A petition may be submitted to cover certain exceptions to stated policies. A petition may not be retroactive, but must be submitted before the exception is to be considered.

Grievance Procedure

The Mount St. Mary's College Student Bill of Rights and Grievance Procedure are available on the MSMC website or by request from the Graduate Division Office.

Graduate Council

The Graduate Council is an advisory body, composed of the graduate program directors, student representatives and the Graduate Dean, whose function is to recommend modifications or changes in graduate policy to the Provost. The main objectives of the Graduate Council are to promote excellence in research and scholarship beyond the undergraduate level and to strengthen existing graduate programs. Among their concerns are admission standards, degree requirements, and program review and approval.