Master of Science in Education

Master of Science in Education in Conjunction with a Preliminary Teacher Preparation Program

Programs leading to the degree of Master of Science in Education in conjunction with a preliminary teaching credential are available with the following areas of concentration:

Elementary Education

Secondary Education

Special Education: Mild/Moderate Disabilities

Required Coursework: (30 units)

 

Required credential program coursework

(24)

EDU 200

Research Methods

(3)

EDU 296A

Masters Project Proposal Seminar

(2)

EDU 296B

Masters Project Seminar

(1)

Master of Science in Education, Individually Designed Program in Conjunction with a Clear Credential Program

Private school teachers may pursue a Master of Science in Education in conjunction with a Clear Credential as an Individually Designed Program. Teachers with two or more years of teaching experience may want to complete the Clear requirements in conjunction with the Masters in Instructional Leadership. Up to six units of graduate credit may be transferred from another institution in place of electives.

Required Coursework: (30 units)

 

Required credential program coursework

(4)

 

Electives

(20)

EDU 200

Research Methods

(3)

EDU 296A

A Masters Project Proposal Seminar

(2)

EDU 296B

Masters Project Seminar

(1)

Master of Science in Education, Instructional Leadership

This advanced masters degree program is designed for credentialed teachers with three or more years of experience who wish to obtain the skills and knowledge that will prepare them to assume leadership roles in curriculum and instruction.

Required Coursework: (30 units)

EDU 240

Curriculum Design and Evaluation

(3)

EDU 242

Creating Inclusive & Motivating Environments for All Students

(3)

EDU 241

Effective Practices for Coaching & Mentoring Teachers

(3)

EDU 243

Teacher Leadership in Professional Development

(3)

 

Electives

(12)

EDU 200

Research Methods

(3)

EDU 296A

Masters Project Proposal Seminar

(2)

EDU 296B

Masters Project Seminar

(1)

Elective Options:

Students may take any graduate education courses to fulfill the elective requirements for the degree. They may also petition to transfer up to six units of graduate credit in place of electives. The following elective options are available for interested/eligible teachers:

EDU 244A/B

National Board Preparation Seminar

(6)

This year long seminar coaches teachers through the National Boards Certification process

EDU 245A/B

Formative Assessment Induction portfolio Review

(4)

Teachers may submit their year one and year two District Induction Portfolios for up to four units of graduate credit.

EDU 246

Grant Writing for Classroom Resources

(3)

Experienced private school teachers may complete the Clear course requirements as Instructional Leadership electives

(4)

Application Requirements

The same application requirements for a Teacher Preparation Program apply to the Master of Science in Education in conjunction with a Preliminary or Clear Teaching Credential. For the Instructional Leadership Program, candidates must also have two years of teaching experience, hold a valid NCLB compliant teaching credential, and be employed in an educational setting. Candidates apply through the Graduate Division. See Graduate Degree Admission Policies, p. 81, for graduate application requirements.

Masters Project

The Masters Project is a classroom-based project designed to improve the candidate's teaching practice through the implementation of research-based practice. Qualitative and quantitative research methodologies are acceptable. An emphasis is placed on reflective, evidence-based practice. The project must be grounded in current research in education.

To enroll in EDU 296A and begin work on the masters project, students must have passed all subtests of the appropriate CSET examination. If completing a preliminary credential, they must also have no more than three units of required coursework outstanding. Candidates are required to prepare and obtain approval of the masters project proposal before enrolling in EDU 296B, Masters Project Seminar. In order to remain registered for EDU 296B, students must receive credit (CR) for EDU 296A. Candidates who have completed the first three chapters of their project, collected and analyzed their data and presented their project findings at the Masters Sharing event will be permitted to walk in the graduation ceremony, but they will not receive their degree until all requirements, including the approval of the final project, have been met. Candidates who are not able to complete their project during the semester in which they enrolled in EDU 296B may be allowed to take an incomplete grade for one semester without extensions if requirements are met.. After that they will be required to enroll in a one-unit project continuation course (EDU 297A/B/C) for the subsequent semesters (excluding the summer session), until the project is complete. Once three project continuation courses are completed, no other options for completing the Masters degree are available. Satisfactory completion of the masters project requirements for degree completion is indicated by a CR grade in EDU 296B, EDU 297A, EDU 297B, or EDU 297C.

Certificate in Instructional Leadership

This program is designed for credentialed teachers with two or more years of experience who already hold a masters degree and wish to obtain the skills and knowledge that will prepare them to assume leadership roles in curriculum and instruction.

Required Coursework: (15 units)

EDU 240

Curriculum Design and Evaluation

(3)

EDU 242

Creating Inclusive & Motivating Environments for All Students

(3)

EDU 241

Effective Practices for Coaching & Mentoring Teachers

(3)

EDU 243

Teacher Leadership in Professional Development

(3)

 

Electives

(3)

EDU 246

Grant Writing for Classroom Resources

(3)

 

OR

 

EDU 299

Special Topics in Education

(3)

Education Courses

EDU 31 Introduction to Early Childhood Education: Profession and Programs (3)

A study of the history, scope, and current philosophies of programs for young children. Observations in a variety of local early childhood programs, and exploration of the education and licensing requirements for such programs. Ethical and value issues in working with children and their families, as well as the importance of becoming an advocate for upgrading the profession and improving the quality of children's services, are stressed.

EDU 32/132 Early Childhood Education: Observation and Curriculum Planning (3)

Introduction and use of alternative formats for recording observations of children. Use of observational data and portfolios to diagnose children's interests, developmental levels, and learning needs. Review of basic principles of child development and their application in the early childhood setting by means of observation and curriculum planning. Opportunities to create environments that enhance cultural pluralism. Includes opportunity for observation and participation in an early childhood setting. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

EDU 33/133 The Visual and Performing Arts for the Young Child (3)

A study of the visual arts (basic concepts, theories, and techniques); dance (basic concepts, and improvisations including philosophical and practical differences among the various disciplines of dance); music (singing, listening and improvisational activities); theatre arts (creative drama, role playing, improvisation and story enactment).

EDU 36/136 Emergent Math and Science Experiences in the Preschool Classroom (3)

An exploration of ways to enhance children's natural interest in mathematics and their disposition to use it to make sense of their physical and social worlds. Students will also learn to create preschool science programs based on the premise that young children develop science knowledge as they observe and act on the world, ask questions, make predictions, test those predictions, and reflect on their experience. Piaget's theory of cognitive development will be studied in detail.

EDU 37/137 Infant and Toddler Development and Care (3)

This course presents an in-depth study of infant and toddler development. The principles of infant and toddler care-giving with an emphasis on the environment and appropriate learning activities will be explored. Health, safety, nutrition, and parent relations will also be discussed. Observation of infants and toddlers and programs for them is required.

EDU 39 Supervised Field Work: Preschool (6)

Instruction of children in an early childhood setting under the direction of a master teacher. Conferences with teachers and supervisors accompany this work. Weekly seminars include methods of curriculum planning and child guidance, as well as content related to children's health, safety, and nutrition. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. This course is taken for CR/NC.

EDU 99 Special Studies (.5-3)

May be repeated for credit.

EDU 100 Introduction to Liberal Studies and the Concurrent Program of Undergraduate Teacher Preparation (1)

An introduction to the study of the liberal arts and sciences and to the concurrent program of teacher preparation. Students are introduced to the interrelationships among subject matter areas and to the essential connection between subject matter preparation and pedagogy (methods of teaching and assessment of learning). Two program themes, diversity and technology, are introduced. Other topics include the philosophy of the liberal studies major, the goals of the concurrent program of teacher preparation and the California (Credit/No Credit)Content Specifications, which are included in the program of study. The MSMC Liberal Studies Portfolio and the California Subject Matter Examination for Teachers (CSET), as components of the final assessment of the major and subject matter preparation program, are introduced and explained.

EDU 101 Introduction to the Concentration: Liberal Studies Major (.5)

This seminar provides: (1) identification of a subject area of concentration as part of the Liberal Studies major and (2) a continuing focus on the program in relation to topics introduced in EDU 100. Students focus on: a) the relationship among the courses required for the major, b) the role of technology in society and of ethical issues surrounding the impact of technology on society, c) an understanding of the diverse ethnic, gender, cultural, and disability perspectives, and d) organization of knowledge in the major and the various teaching strategies experienced in the areas of study. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EDU 100. (Credit/No Credit)

EDU 102 Integrative Seminar in Liberal Studies (1)

Culminating course required to complete the liberal studies major. Students examine the relationships among the disciplines included in their program of study, synthesize major themes, and compare forms of inquiry. Requirements for the Liberal Studies Portfolio are reviewed and selected requirements discussed and submitted as class assignments. Credit for EDU 102 requires the submission of the the Liberal Studies Portfolio.  Students successfully completing course requirements but not the Portfolio may be assigned an "In Progress" (IP) grade.  The California Subject Matter Examination for Teachers (CSET) is reviewed as a program requirement. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EDU 101.

EDU 106/206 School & Society (3)

The course explores major concepts and principles regarding the historical and contemporary purposes, roles and functions of formal education in American society. Three primary areas are examined: (1) the social and cultural conditions of K-12 schooling, especially as it relates to persistent inequalities in schools and the role of teachers in the creation of equitable classrooms; (2) the underlying principles, values, and history of the content areas taught in K-12 schools in the U.S.; and (3) legal and ethical obligations of teachers and schools in today's society.

EDU 112 Physical Education: Elementary Curriculum (1)

This course is designed to introduce elementary teacher preparation candidates to the California Physical Education Framework and specific teaching strategies for the development of students' motor skills, a healthy lifestyle, student knowledge of rules and strategies of games and sports, and student self-confidence and self-worth in relation to physical education and recreation.

EDU 116A/316A Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Elementary Fieldwork (6)

(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site.

EDU 116B/316B Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Elementary Fieldwork (6)

(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site.

Supervised teaching is designed as the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and provides opportunities for the candidate to integrate and refine the many competencies acquired throughout the program. The goal of supervised teaching is to ensure that the candidate is prepared to assume the full-time responsibilities of a classroom. In EDU 116A/316A and EDU 116B/316B the student assumes the responsibilities of the classroom teacher and is under the direct supervision of an experienced and effective teacher and a college supervisor at MSMC selected sites (see Option I, Supervised Teaching). The supervised teaching involves two assignments, each spanning one-half of the semester in two schools, and at two grade levels (primary and intermediate). Students register for EDU 116A/EDU316A for the first assignment and for EDU 116B/316B for the second assignment. Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the bi-weekly seminar (EDU 123/323). The student must have access to daily transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 316C Supervised Teaching: In-Service Elementary Fieldwork (6)

Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom.

In EDU 316C, In-service teachers (private school or one-year interns) are supervised in their own classrooms over one or two semesters (6 units per semester) by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option II, Supervised Teaching). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the bi-weekly seminar (EDU 323). In-service teachers who are not eligible to waive six units of supervised teaching may repeat EDU 316C one time for a total of 12 units of credit.

EDU 316D Supervised Teaching: Intern Elementary Fieldwork (3)

Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom.

Two-year elementary interns enroll in EDU 316D for three units each fall and spring semester of their program. Interns teach in their own classrooms and are supervised by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option III, Supervised Teaching). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the intern seminar (EDU 323). Interns can repeat EDU 316D four times for a total of 12 units of credit.

EDU 316L Intensive Fieldwork: Elementary (0)

Fall, Spring or Summer at MSMC approved site (Additional fieldwork fee of $150.)

EDU 316L, Intensive Fieldwork, provides students with the opportunity to observe and participate in a general education, elementary public school setting. This two-week, full day experience is designed to provide elementary interns with field experience in conjunction with their pre-service requirements (EDU 250), to provide private school teachers with exposure to public school classrooms and to provide special education teachers with exposure to general education classrooms. For students who are full-time teachers, this experience is completed in the summer or during their off-track time.

EDU 123/323 Supervised Teaching Culminating Seminar (0.5, 1 or 2 units)

This course is the final seminar in the Teacher Preparation Program. Taken concurrently with the supervised teaching fieldwork, if required, it provides a culminating forum for discussion, reflection, and goal-setting toward developing professionalism as a teacher. Course activities will extend candidates' understanding of key concepts and principles in the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and allow candidates to demonstrate competence on the Teaching Performance Assessment. Elementary, secondary and special education students enroll in separate sections of EDU 123/323. Interns enroll in the seminar for 0.5 (two-year interns) or 1 (one-year interns) unit during each semester of their program. Pre-service teachers enroll in 2 units concurrent with the supervised teaching experience.

EDU 138A Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs: Program Development and Curriculum (3)

Various program structures and curricula will be examined together with administrative styles relevant to the operation of early childhood education programs. Development and implementation of appropriate curricula will be stressed as will environmental planning. Course will partially fulfill administrative requirement for Child Development Director Permit.

EDU 138B Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs: Financial and Legal Aspects (3)

Examination of various funding and legal requirements in the operation of early childhood programs with special focus on budgeting, staffing, licensing and compliance with Federal and State requirements. Course will partially fulfill administrative requirement for Child Development Director Permit.

EDU 138C Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs: Management of Non-Profit Programs (3)

This course will introduce non-business majors to managerial theories to lead non-profit organizations. The learning experience includes review of literature, class presentations and active sponsorship of service organizations. A service-learning project integrates theory with practice, requiring team cooperation, planning and accountability. (Also BUS 139, GER 138, PSY 128 and SOC 138)

EDU 191 Child Development Internship (3)

Applied work enhancing student understanding of the principles of child development in community settings. Field work must involve ongoing interactions with children under age 13 and/or their parents. Options include child care, infant/toddler, preschool, school age recreational, hospital child life, special education, resource and referral, and child guidance settings. Prerequisite: PSY 113.

EDU 196H Senior Honors Thesis (3)

Open only to students admitted to the Honors Program.

EDU 199 A/B Special Studies (0.5-3; 0.5-3)

May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing or consent of department.

EDU 200 Research Methods (3)

A study of the various approaches to educational research including historical, qualitative, and quantitative. Intended to develop facility in reading research articles and applying knowledge gained through research to one's own teaching practice and to issues of importance in education. Candidates prepare a review of the literature in an area of interest.

EDU 205 Applied Technologies for Educators (2)

This course is an advanced seminar in which teachers study the pedagogical implications of technology in education and gain practical experience in integrating technology into classroom instruction. In addition to applying common software (such as word processing, spreadsheets, database, and multi-media) to achieve educational objectives, students will be engaged in projects utilizing current technology, such as collaborative dialogue tools (email, discussion groups), internet research, electronic portfolios, and distance learning. Course assignments require application of principles in the teacher's current teaching context.

EDU 212 Physical Education: Elementary Curriculum (1)

This course is designed to introduce elementary teacher preparation candidates to the California Physical Education Framework and specific teaching strategies for the development of students' motor skills, a healthy lifestyle, student knowledge of rules and strategies of games and sports, and student self-confidence and self-worth in relation to physical education and recreation.

EDU 213A Health-Related Issues in Education (1)

The course addresses major laws, concepts and principles related to creating a supportive, healthy environment for K-12 student learning. Credential candidates will study the effects of student health and safety on learning, teachers' legal responsibilities, and how to access school and community resources to meet individual student needs. They will practice means for working constructively with students, families, and community members on health and safety issues.

EDU 213B Healthy Environments for Student Learning (2)

This advanced course addresses major concepts and principles related to creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. This advanced course addresses major concepts and principles related to creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. Teachers will investigate strategies for building a classroom climate of trust and respect where students can develop positive social skills. They will practice means for working constructively with students, families, and community members to create safe school environments that respect the rights of all students. Course assignments require application of principles in the teacher's current teaching context.

EDU 225A Assessment in Teacher Development (1)

This professional clear course teaches candidates about the use of self-assessment to analyze their competencies, set professional goals, and create a development plan for growth as an educator. Teachers will conduct an investigation regarding their personal context for teaching, including information on student demographics and campus resources.

EDU 225B Professional Investigation (1)

This professional clear course assists candidates in conducting an inquiry project on a topic of their choice in order to advance their development as a teacher. Within this inquiry project, teachers will be required to describe and evaluate how they are addressing the needs of three focus students (an English Learner, a student with special needs, and a third student of their choice). Hybrid online.

EDU 225C Professional Investigation ll (1)

This professional clear course assists candidates in conducting an inquiry project on a topic of their choice in order to advance their development as a teacher. Within this inquiry project, teachers will be required to describe and evaluate how they are addressing the needs of three focus students (an English Learner, a student with special needs, and a third student of their choice).

EDU 225D Portfolio Development and Analysis (1)

This professional clear course teaches candidates about the use of professional development portfolios to evaluate the accomplishment of personal goals. Teachers will investigate the use of portfolios as evaluative tools and produce a culminating portfolio of their growth as professional educators. (Additional Professional Clear Portfolio fee of $150. Hybrid online.

EDU 240 Curriculum Design and Evaluation (3)

This course prepares teachers to take leadership roles in curriculum and program design. Using principles of Understanding by Design, teachers will identify standards-based student outcomes and design curricula that will enable students to reach those academic goals. These curriculum design skills will be used to critically analyze and adapt existing curricula as well as design new curricula. Teachers will develop skills in formative and summative program evaluation to examine the effects of curriculum innovation on student performance and modify curricula based on those findings. Prerequisite: Preliminary Teaching Credential

EDU 241 Effective Practices for Coaching and Mentoring Teachers (3)

This course introduces teacher leaders to the philosophy and practices of effective coaching and mentoring systems. It is designed to equip teacher leaders with the theoretical understanding and practical skills necessary to coach and/or mentor both beginning and experienced teachers. Teacher leaders will examine the teaching and learning philosophies of leading educators, psychologists and theorists in order to influence teachers' decision-making processes; enhance understanding of their own and others' educational philosophies; and understand how these theories affect both pedagogy and student learning. Teacher leaders will focus on increasing knowledge and skills in Cognitive Coaching to assist colleagues in developing a cycle of reflective practice and improving their pedagogy. Prerequisite: Preliminary Teaching Credential and at least two years of teaching experience.

EDU 242 Creating Inclusive and Motivating Classroom Environments for All Students (3)

This course focuses on enhancing teachers' abilities to engage a diverse body of students, including those often described as reluctant learners, marginalized, or at risk of failure within our school system. Teachers will develop their capacity to increase student motivation through an examination of various theories linked to practical applications. For example, using principles of critical pedagogy, teachers will link curriculum to issues students face in their daily lives. Strategies learned will include those aimed at helping students build self-determination as they take responsibility for and think critically about their learning. Teachers will hone their pedagogy to enhance teacher-student relationships, maximize learning opportunities through cooperative and collaborative learning, differentiate instruction, and create an environment where all students can be successful.

EDU 243 Teacher Leadership in Professional Development (3)

Teacher leaders are often asked to develop professional development activities in their areas of expertise. This course will provide a foundation in the design of professional development programs and effective pedagogy for adult learners. Teachers will conduct a needs assessment to determine the professional development needs for their school in a particular area, design and implement a professional development program to address these needs, and evaluate the effects of the program on teaching skills and student outcomes. In addition, teachers will develop their presentation and publication skills. Prerequisite: Preliminary Teaching Credential and two years of teaching experience.

EDU 244A/B National Boards Preparation Seminar (3-3)

Taught by a National Board certified teacher, this two-semester seminar will guide teachers through the preparation for the completion of the portfolio and assessment requirements for National Board certification in their discipline area. Prerequisite: Preliminary Teaching Credential and two years of teaching experience

EDU 245A/B Formative Assessment Induction Portfolio Review (2-4)

Teachers participating in an Induction Program may submit their formative assessment induction portfolio for review for up to four graduate credit units. The portfolio is reviewed for credit according to an evaluation rubric available from the Education Department. The portfolio may be submitted for evaluation up to one year after completion of an induction program. An evaluation fee of $150 is charged. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Clear Teacher Preparation Program and participation in an approved Induction Program.

EDU 246 Grant Writing for Classroom Resources (3)

Grant writing is often the only way to obtain much needed resources for classrooms, especially when implementing innovative curricula and programs. In this course, teachers will learn how to identify grant opportunities, design a project with defined student outcomes that meet the grant specifications, develop a budget, monitor grant implementation, and write a final grant report. Prerequisite: Preliminary Teaching Credential.

EDU 150/250 Elementary Instruction: Theory and Practice (3)

This course is designed to develop effective instructional and management methods within the context of a multilingual society and is the introductory professional preparation course for the Elementary Teacher Preparation Program. Students develop effective educational practices through observation and participation in an elementary school classroom, inquiry-based research carried out by the teacher candidates themselves, the use of technology tools and curriculum resources, and the study of educational and language learning theories. Course content includes classroom management, standards-based lesson planning, and an emphasis on content instruction for students learning English as a new language. GS-VI

Note: On-site school observations require a minimum commitment of several hours a week during the teaching day, as well as travel time to and from fieldwork site. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 251 Child and Adolescent Development and Learning Across Cultures (3)

Analyzes learning and development in children and adolescents across cultures and explores the complementary and interdependent relationships of biology and culture. Historical and global comparisons will be made to contemporary Angelino children as well as to the educator's personal experience. Emphasis is placed on developing a personal philosophy of how we, as a society and as individuals, can work to give children healthy foundations that support growth and learning.

EDU 252 Diversity and Schools (3)

This course is designed for teacher candidates to explore the role that culture plays and has played in our lives, classrooms, city and country. Students analyze the nature and manifestations of culture, the concepts of cultural contact, and the history of cultural diversity in the United States and California. The dynamics of prejudice are studied, and emphasis is placed on delineating curriculum and practices that honor, motivate, and empower all students. Examination of personal biases and identification of areas of deficient knowledge is encouraged. Use of the Los Angeles community as a powerful resource will be explored.

EDU 253 Language Competence and Education (3)

This course is designed to provide general and special educators with a foundational background in applied linguistics as it relates to K-12 instruction with applications for students with limited English proficiency and students with language learning disabilities. Topics to be covered include the structure of English; linguistic variation; language development in first- and second-language learners; disorders of language development, and implications for creating classroom environments that promote language development.

EDU 154/254 Mathematics and Science: Elementary Curriculum (3)

This course examines mathematics and science concepts and theories and their application in teaching. A major focus is on constructivist learning and inquiry and related instructional methods and assessment procedures. Concrete, manipulative materials critical to the learning of mathematics and science are used throughout the course. Emphasis is placed on both individual and group participation. Note: Observation and participation in exemplary mathematics and science elementary school classrooms plus travel time is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisite:

EDU 155/255 Social Science and the Arts: Elementary Curriculum (3)

This course introduces curriculum and instructional methods for teaching social studies and the arts in elementary school. Course content addresses the scope and sequence of the social science and arts curricula; thematic teaching and the integration of the social science and arts disciplines in relation to California Content Standards and Frameworks; the use of technology resources; and support for English language learners. Candidates use backwards design to create an original curriculum unit. Note: Observation and participation in community instructional settings plus travel time is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisites: EDU 150/250 and, for undergraduates, official acceptance in the Elementary Teacher Preparation Program with a passing CBEST score.

EDU 156/256 Language and Literacy: Elementary Curriculum (3)

This course encompasses language and literacy learning in the elementary grades and methods for teaching a balanced literacy program to multiethnic, multilingual student populations. Current theoretical and practical aspects of the reading, writing, and related language arts curriculum will be learned. These include explicit instruction and strategies for developing a balanced literacy program for native English speakers and English language learners; observational skills necessary for helping individual students; and exploring appropriate materials. Methods and principles for developing proficient readers and writers and for analyzing students' strengths and areas of needed growth will be studied and practiced, including use of technological tools and resources. Note: Fifteen hours of focused observations and participation (plus travel time) are required in an exemplary elementary school classroom during language arts instruction. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisites: ENG 102/ EDU 253 and EDU 150/250 and, for undergraduates, official acceptance in the Elementary Teacher Preparation Program with a passing CBEST score.

EDU 164A/364A Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Secondary Fieldwork (6)

(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site.

EDU 164B/364B Supervised Teaching: Per-Service Secondary Fieldwork (6)

(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site.

Supervised teaching is designed as the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and provides opportunities for the candidate to integrate and refine the many competencies acquired throughout the program. The goal of supervised teaching is to ensure that the candidate is prepared to assume the full-time responsibilities of a classroom. In EDU 164A/364A and EDU 164B/364B the student assumes the responsibilities of the classroom teacher and is under the direct supervision of an experienced and effective teacher and a college supervisor (see Option I, Supervised Teaching). The supervised teaching involves two assignments, each spanning one-half of the semester in two schools, and at two grade levels (middle school and high school). Students register for EDU 164A/EDU364A for the first assignment and for EDU 164B/364B for the second assignment. Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the bi-weekly seminar (EDU 123/323). The student must have access to daily transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 364C Supervised Teaching: In-Service Secondary Fieldwork (6)

Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom.

In EDU 364C, in-service teachers (private or one-year interns) are supervised in their own classrooms over one or two semesters (6 units per semester) by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option II, Supervised Teaching). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the bi-weekly seminar (EDU 323). In-service teachers who are not eligible to waive six units of supervised teaching may repeat EDU 364C one time for a total of 12 units of credit.

EDU 316D Supervised Teaching: Intern Secondary Fieldwork (3)

Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom.

Two-year secondary interns enroll in EDU 364D for three units each fall and spring semester of their program. Interns teach in their own classrooms and are supervised by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option III, Supervised Teaching). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the intern seminar (EDU 323). Interns can repeat EDU 364D four times for a total of 12 units of credit.

EDU 364L Intensive Fieldwork: Secondary (0)

Fall, Spring or Summer at MSMC approved site (Additional fieldwork fee of $150.)

EDU 364L, Intensive Fieldwork, provides students with the opportunity to observe and participate in a general education, secondary public school setting. This two-week, full day experience is designed to provide secondary interns with field experience in conjunction with their pre-service requirements (EDU 266), to provide private school teachers with exposure to public school classrooms and to provide special education teachers with exposure to general education classrooms. For students who are full-time teachers, this experience is completed in the summer or during their off-track time.

EDU 166/266 Principles of Secondary Education and Content Area Modules (4)

Principles of Secondary Education is the initial professional preparation course in the Secondary Teacher Preparation Program. This course provides opportunities to assess student development and to design and deliver instruction informed by contemporary learning theory and research, practical experience, and inquiry. The role of the teacher is examined as one who assists student performance, with special attention to the needs of adolescents, English learners, and urban populations and settings. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies. Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline.

Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 167/267 Principles of Secondary Curriculum and Content Area Modules (4)

Principles of Secondary Curriculum is a continuation of EDU 166/266 and focuses on the teacher as curricular decision-maker and instructional designer. Students deepen their knowledge of assessment of student development, design and delivery of instruction, and educational equity. Students use backwards design to create units of instruction and develop performance assessments anchored in the California content standards for their discipline. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies. Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline.

Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisite:

EDU 166/266. For undergraduates, official acceptance in the Secondary Teacher Preparation Program with a passing CBEST score.

EDU 168/268 Content-Based Reading Instruction and Content Area Modules (4)

Content-Based Reading Instruction encompasses language and literacy development in secondary curricula and methods for enhancing that development with multiethnic, multilingual student populations. The interwoven nature of speaking, reading, writing, and listening in content area instruction will be explored, with emphasis on the importance of content-based discourse in the development of disciplinary understanding and critical thinking. Course content includes instructional and assessment strategies for students learning English. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies.

Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline.

Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

Prerequisites: ENG 102/EDU 253, EDU 166/277, and EDU 167/267.

EDU 170/270A Introduction to the Education of Exceptional Learners (1)

This course is designed to introduce teacher preparation candidates to the general educators' role and responsibilities in the education of exceptional learners in the general education classroom. Characteristics of students with disabilities and gifted and talented students are explored as candidates visit programs for exceptional learners. Candidates develop basic skills in the assessment of the learning and language abilities of exceptional learners and apply their knowledge of the state and federal laws pertaining to the education of students with disabilities during a class simulation of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting. Special attention is given to modifying instruction to meet the needs of exceptional learners.

Fulfills the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Level I special education requirement for the Preliminary and Professional Clear Credential.

EDU 270B Special Populations: Supporting Educational Equity and Access (2)

This course reviews the historical and philosophical significance of special education and the education of gifted and talented students and effective practices for meeting these students needs in a general education environment. The legal and administrative framework for the education of exceptional learners in California is addressed with an emphasis on the policies and procedures in the candidate's school district for identifying and providing services for these students. Coursework will emphasize the development of positive, inclusive classrooms with differentiated instruction designed to enable all students to achieve at high performance levels. All course requirements will be applied in the teacher's current teaching assignment.

EDU 270C Foundations for the Education of Exceptional Learners (3)

This course is designed as a pre-service course for special education candidates, in particular, interns. The legal and administrative framework for the education of exceptional learners in California is addressed with an emphasis on the policies and procedures for identifying and providing services for these students. Coursework will emphasize the development of positive, inclusive classrooms with differentiated instruction designed to enable all students to achieve at high performance levels. In coursework and accompanying fieldwork, candidates will be introduced to the practical skills they will need to establish and manage a classroom learning environment for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Candidates will learn foundational skills for classroom management skills, conducting classroom assessments of student learning needs, and designing instructional programs that meet student needs and are grounded in the California curriculum standards. Candidates will be introduced to the processes and procedures for development of an Individualized Instruction Plan and the support services that are available for students with special needs. This course is taken in conjunction with EDU 378L, Intensive Fieldwork in Special Education.

EDU 271 Educational Assessment of Students with Disabilities (3)

This course examines the educational assessment of students with disabilities including statistical concepts in measuring abilities, principles of assessment, methods of administration and interpretation, and the relationship of assessment results to the determination of eligibility for special education services and the development of an Individualized Educational Plan. Standardized educational assessment instruments and informal curriculum-based measurements are examined. Particular emphasis is placed on the appropriateness of standardized and informal assessment instruments and procedures for culturally and linguistically diverse students.

Fieldwork requirements: 10 hours assessing a K-12 student experiencing significant academic difficulty. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

Prerequisites: General Education Requirements and EDU 270C.

EDU 272 Classroom Management for Students with Learning and Behavior Problems (3)

This course provides an overview of behavioral disturbances in the classroom. Medical, behavioral and socio-cultural interventions will be explored with an emphasis on creating positive classroom environments that enable students with learning and behavior problems to participate productively in the classroom learning community. The historical, theoretical and legal bases for identification and treatment of students with behavior disorders, serious emotional disturbances, and attention deficit disorders will be addressed

Fieldwork Requirements: 10 hours in a classroom for students with learning and behavior problems. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

Prerequisites: General Education Requirements and EDU 270C.

EDU 275 Literacy Instruction for Struggling Readers and Writers (3)

This course is designed to meet the competencies required for language arts instruction for the Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential and to prepare general educators to meet the language arts instructional needs of general education students who experience literacy development problems. Assessment and instructional strategies drawn from diverse perspectives (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, social-interaction) are presented and examined relative to their effectiveness. Reading and writing difficulties are examined across the K-12 continuum. Emphasis is on application of literacy assessment and instructional strategies in actual teaching settings with students experiencing reading delays.

Fieldwork Requirements: 10 hours assessing and instructing a K-12 student experiencing significant reading delay. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisites: General Education requirements and EDU 270C.

EDU 276 Content Area Instruction for Students with Special Needs (3)

In this course the candidate draws upon the knowledge and skills requisite for effective content area instruction in the general education classroom with necessary adaptations to make the curriculum accessible to students with special needs. Emphasis is placed on the creation of curriculum units that incorporate learning strategies approaches for instruction of students with mild/moderate disabilities and instructional modifications for students with limited English proficiency and students with below grade level literacy skills. Content area instruction in math, science and social studies for students with mild to moderate disabilities in grades four through twelve is addressed. Fieldwork requirements: Ten hours in a special education setting for students with mild/moderate disabilities at the intermediate to high school levels. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisites: General Education Requirements and EDU270C.

EDU 378A Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Special Education (6)

Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site. (Additional fieldwork fee of $150).

EDU 378B Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Special Education (6)

Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site. (Additional fieldwork fee of $150)

Supervised teaching is designed as the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and provides opportunities for the candidate to integrate and refine the many competencies acquired throughout the program. The goal of supervised teaching is to ensure that the candidate is prepared to assume the full-time responsibilities of a classroom. In EDU 378A and EDU 378B, the student assumes the responsibilities of the classroom teacher and is under the direct supervision of an experienced and effective teacher and a college supervisor (see Option I, Supervised Teaching). The supervised teaching involves two assignments, each spanning one-half of the semester in two special education settings for students with mild/moderate disabilities, and at two grade levels. Students register for EDU378A for the first assignment and for EDU 378B for the second assignment. Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the bi-weekly seminar (EDU 323). The student must have access to daily transportation to the fieldwork site. Students who have a general education teaching credential or two years or more of general education teaching experience may petition to waive 6 units of the supervised teaching requirement on the basis of their experience. These students complete one seven-week assignment in a special education classroom in one of the MSMC affiliated schools (EDU 378A, 6 units).

EDU 378C Supervised Teaching: In-Service Special Education (6)

Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom

EDU 378C is designed for one-year special education interns. Teachers teach in their own classrooms over one or two semesters (6 units per semester) and are supervised by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option II, Supervised Teaching). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the bi-weekly seminar (EDU 323). Students repeat EDU 378C one time for a total of 12 units of credit.

EDU 378D Supervised Teaching: Intern Special Education (3)

Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom

Two-year education specialist interns enroll in EDU 378D for three units each fall and spring semester of their program. Interns teach in their own classrooms and are supervised by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option III, Supervised Teaching). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the intern seminar (EDU 323). Interns can repeat EDU 378D four times for a total of 12 units of credit.

EDU 378L Intensive Fieldwork: Special Education (0)

Fall, Spring or Summer at MSMC approved site. (Additional fieldwork fee of $150.)

EDU 378L, Intensive Fieldwork, provides students with the opportunity to observe and participate in a special education setting. This two-week, full day experience is designed to provide special education interns with field experience in conjunction with their pre-service requirements (EDU 270C).

EDU 281 Advanced Issues in Assessment & Instruction of Students with Special Needs (3)

In this advanced course, candidates acquire knowledge and skills to appropriately assess and instruct students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Course content includes selecting and administering a variety of formal and informal assessment procedures in order to be able to teach, adapt and integrate curriculum appropriate to the educational needs of students.

Prerequisite: Preliminary Level I Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential

EDU 282 Consultation and Collaboration for Students with Special Needs (3)

This course will provide opportunities for candidates to develop skills in communication, collaboration and consultation with teachers and other school personnel, community professionals and parents. A specific area of emphasis will be on the communication of relevant social, academic, and behavioral information in the areas of assessment, curriculum behavior management, social adjustment and legal requirements. At the completion of the course, candidates will be prepared to coordinate the process involved in special education placements. Prerequisite: Preliminary teaching credential.

EDU 283 Supportive Environments for Students with Behavioral and Emotional Needs (3)

In this advanced course, candidates develop systems for academic and social skills instruction for students with complex behavioral and emotional needs including attention disorders, conduct disorders, depression and suicidal behavior, psychotic behavior, anxiety and related disorders, and delinquency and substance abuse. Course content includes advanced study of behavioral supports, social skills instruction, crisis management, and positive learning environments. Collaborative work with other professionals and community agencies is emphasized in the development of comprehensive support programs for these students.

Prerequisite: Preliminary teaching credential and EDU 272.

EDU 289 English Learners: Supporting Educational Equity and Access (2)

This advanced course for teachers focuses on the delivery of specialized instruction for English learners to support equity in access to the core curriculum. Teachers will become knowledgeable about instructional programs, school organizational structures, and resources designed to meet the needs of English learners, particularly those in their own district. They will develop skills in designing, implementing and evaluating instructional programs to support English language development and access to the core academic curriculum for English learners. Teachers will use assessments of English learners, such as the California English Language Development Test, to diagnose students' language abilities relative to the core academic curriculum and plan appropriate instruction. Course assignments require application of principles in the teacher's current teaching context.

EDU 295 Independent Study (1-3)

A student-designed course of study. See Guidelines for Independent Study. Student must complete an Independent Study Approval and Application Form.

EDU 296A Masters Project Proposal (2 units)

Students work with their project advisor in this course to design a proposal for an action research project to be completed in their classroom. The masters project provides an opportunity for the candidate to develop competency in researching an issue relevant to their teaching practice, designing and implementing a project focused on this issue that will improve their practice, and preparing and presenting a report of the research findings. Prerequisite: EDU 200 (concurrent accepted), official score report with a passing score on all subtests of the required CSET subject matter examination.

EDU 296B Masters Project (1 unit)

Candidates work with their project advisor in this course to implement their masters project

proposal and write the final project report. Prerequisite: EDU 200 and satisfactory completion of EDU 296A as evidenced by an approved masters project proposal.

EDU 297A,B,C Thesis/Project Continuation (1,1,1)

Continuation of Master's Project or Thesis under the direction of the faculty advisor.

EDU 299 Special Studies in Education (3)

Courses on special topics in education. May be repeated for credit.

EDU 321 Professional Induction Planning Seminar (.5)

Candidates for the Professional Level II Education Specialist credential are required to take this course at the beginning of their Level II program. During this individualized seminar, the candidate develops a Professional Induction Plan with an assigned district support provider and a college advisor.

EDU 322 Professional Induction Evaluation Seminar (.5)

This seminar is the culminating experience for the Professional Education Specialist credential program. Students reevaluate their professional competency to assess and teach culturally diverse students with learning and behavior problems. They compile a Professional Educator Portfolio, which includes artifacts documenting their professional competence and a plan for their continuing professional growth. The district support provider and the college advisor continue to support the student in this process.

EDU 323 Supervised Teaching Culminating Seminar: Special Education (2)

This course is the final seminar in the Education Specialist Teacher Preparation Program. Taken concurrently with the supervised teaching fieldwork, it provides a culminating forum for discussion, reflection, and goal-setting toward developing professionalism as a teacher. Candidates develop a professional portfolio that documents their competence on the professional standards for Education Specialists. Included in the portfolio are Teacher Performance Assessment Tasks that are completed during the supervised teaching experience and evaluated by trained assessors.

Open Courses for ALL MSMC Graduate Students

The following courses are open to any MSMC graduate student as electives with advisor approval:

EDU 206 School and Society (3)

EDU 252 Diversity and Schools (3)

EDU 251 Child and Adolescent Development and Learning Across Cultures (3)

EDU 253 Language Competence and Education (3

Education Extension Units

This extension course is offered in conjunction with the Inner City Arts for the pedagogy series.

EDUX 705XL Creativity in the Classroom (2)

The Creativity in the Classroom series consists of five engaging workshops including drawing, painting, ceramics, dance, music, drama, poetry and playmaking. The series is designed for those new to teaching the visual and performing arts as well as those with a full range of experience. In the course, participants explore their own creativity and gain skills and knowledge to integrate a variety of arts disciplines into language arts, social studies, science and math. They are introduced to the Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards and explore discussion strategies that apply to the arts and to all student work. Strong emphasis is placed on practices that support the creation of a safe, supportive environment for creative exploration and expression. Community Building and English Language Development strategies are part of each session. The course is appropriate for classroom teachers, teaching artists and other interested community members.