Nursing

The college offers Associate, Baccalaureate, and Masters degree programs with majors in nursing that provide options for career mobility.

Philosophy

Mount St. Mary's College is an academic community committed to continuing exploration of our relationship to God, to other persons, and to nature. This exploration takes the form of programs devoted to excellence in the liberal arts and career preparation with a special focus on educating women for participation and leadership in our society and our time. The Catholic tradition of the College offers a value orientation for the student's personal and professional life, giving the motivation for a Christian commitment that views professional life as service.

Nursing is a service to humanity. It is a profession committed to: the promotion and restoration of health; the prevention of illness of individuals, families, groups, and communities; and support for a dignified death. It is the science whose main concern involves the life processes that positively affect the health status and integrity of persons, families, and groups. These life processes involve physiological, sociological, and spiritual life components. A focus on the interaction of these components delineates nursing science.

The Department of Nursing functions within the philosophy of the College and has developed a curriculum on the Roy Adaptation Model of Nursing. The Adaptation Model recognizes that a person is a bio-psycho-social-spiritual being in constant interaction with a dynamic and complex world. Humans possess both innate and acquired mechanisms which, in health, enable coping with the complex internal and external environment. In times of stress, these coping mechanisms may be disrupted. The ability to adapt to the internal and external environment at this time affects the person's position on the health-illness continuum. The promotion of adaptation in the direction of health depends upon an educational program which prepares the student to understand the person as a total being, to recognize and respect human values, and to utilize a scientific process within the framework of the adaptation model.

The goal of nursing is directing, maintaining, and reinforcing the adaptation of person, families, and groups toward optimal health.

The process involves:

  • Assessing the factors that influence the position on the illness continuum, the factors that influence the position, and the effectiveness of the coping mechanisms.
  • Determining the actual or potential health problem(s).
  • Establishing mutually acceptable goals.
  • Intervening by promoting adaptation through the modification of influencing factors and/or increasing the response in the coping potential.
  • Evaluating the position on the health-illness continuum to reaffirm and/or modify interventions.

Each student enters the nursing program with a unique background for potential growth. Students are active learners. Learning progresses from novice to beginning level practitioner in a variety of settings from simple to complex. Because each student is unique with different learning potentials and different critical thinking skills, the expectation is that the student will seek assistance and demonstrate growth at all stages of learning. The extent to which this distinct potential is achieved is determined by behavioral changes which are observed and evaluated in the context of the expected outcomes of the learning process.

The faculty believe the program has different levels of competencies for students to achieve their distinct potential. Options to select entry levels to promote career mobility are offered.

The faculty believe providing a supportive environment enhances learning at each level of the program. The faculty act as role models and therefore must be clinically competent and professionally active. In addition, they assume responsibility for individual advisement of nursing majors and provide opportunities for assistance in the event of academic difficulties.

Nursing Major Policy on Admission/Progression: Essential Performance Standards

Background:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 was instituted by Congress to prohibit discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. Schools of nursing and state university systems, like other state and federally funded entities, are required to comply with the stipulations of the ADA. The ADA defines a qualified individual with a disability as an individual with a disability who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the employment position that such individual holds or desires. In addition, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination in admissions of a qualified person with disabilities.

ADA and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 eligibility requirements vary depending on the type of services, activities, and functions needed in particular areas. The practice of nursing is an applied discipline with cognitive, sensory, affective, and motor components. Hence, students must be able to perform the functions which are necessary for the safe practice of nursing and essential to the licensing standards with or without reasonable accommodations in order to be admitted to or progress in the nursing program at Mount St. Mary's College.

Core Performance Standards:

  1. Ability to think critically, such that the student can begin to make clinical decisions, identify cause-and-effect relationships with clinical date, and develop nursing care plans.
  2. Ability to demonstrate interpersonal abilities such that the student can appropriately interact with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds.
  3. Ability to clearly communicate in verbal and written forms such that students can communicate nursing actions, interpret client responses, initiate health teaching, document and understand nursing activities, and interact with clients, staff and faculty supervisors.
  4. Ability to maneuver in small spaces and move from one place to another such that the student can move around in clients' rooms and bathrooms, into and out of work spaces, access treatment areas, and procure needed emergency materials when indicated. While health care agencies must meet ADA physical access standards, potential clients with equipment may limit the amount of available space in which to move.
  5. Ability to demonstrate gross and fine motor skills sufficient to provide safe and effective nursing care such that the student can move and position clients in and out of bed, ambulate and transport patients, calibrate and use equipment, and perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
  6. Ability to hear well enough to monitor and assess clients' health needs such that the student can hear cries for help, alarms on equipment, emergency signals, breath and heart sounds on auscultation, and various overhead codes.
  7. Ability to see well enough to observe and assess clients' health status and changes in condition such that the student could see grimacing, movement, changes in skin color, rashes, and other observed client changes or responses.
  8. Ability to have tactile capabilities sufficient for physical assessment such that the student could successfully perform palpation, note changes in skin temperature, perform skills related to therapeutic activities and identify by touch other changes in client condition.

Credit for policy given to Point Loma Nazarene College printed with permission from Point Loma Nazarene College

Department of Nursing Policies

Policies apply to each nursing program

Nursing focuses on prevention and promotion of health. Students admitted to and progressing through Mount St. Mary's College Nursing Program are strongly encouraged to engage in health practices which model those they are teaching to patients. Prior to enrollment in the first nursing course, students will be informed of the nursing department health policies.

Every student admitted to the nursing courses must have completed the following health data. Clinical agencies will not accept a student who has not met all of the following health requirements:

  • Past medical history on which the student attests that physical and emotional health are such as to allow for full participation in both clinical and theoretical components of the nursing curriculum.
  • Physical examination, including a visual screening, urinalysis, and complete blood count, must be completed by a licensed physician, certified nurse practitioner, or physician's assistant annually.
  • A two-step PPD/Mantoux skin test for Tuberculosis is required on admission to the nursing program. Then annual testing is required. If the student tests positive or has previously tested positive, a chest x-ray is required every year.
Immunizations Required for Nursing Programs
  • Polio – Series of three doses for those under 18 years of age.
  • Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR) – If born in 1957 or later, the student must have two doses, with at least one since 1980. Students born prior to 1957 may either have one dose or demonstrate proof of immunity through titers or have two doses.
  • Tetanus and Diptheria (TD) – Every 10 years.
  • Hepatitis B – Unless the student can demonstrate immunity through a titer, all nursing majors must have completed at least two of three shots prior to beginning clinical. The second shot is given one month after the first, and the third shot is due six months after the first.
Titers Required for Nursing Programs
  • Measles: demonstrate immunity through serological testing or be immunized for rubella, rubeola, mumps
  • Varicella (chicken pox) Titer: If the result is negative, two doses of a varicella vaccine are required one month apart.
  • Hepatitis B Titer: After the third shot of the hepatitis B series is completed, the student must demonstrate proof of immunity. A Hepatitis IGG AB titer is drawn a minimum of 30 days after the 3rd shot is received. If the titer is negative, a fourth vaccine may be required with a repeat titer after 30 days. If the titer continues to be negative it is recommended for the student to have a medical evaluation to determine the efficacy of further Hepatitis B immunization.

If a student is not able to comply with these health requirements, the student must obtain a written statement to this effect from her/his physician and submit it to the Nursing Department.

Students have the responsibility of disclosing any temporary medical condition which may hamper their ability to perform the essential performance standards. A written medical release from their health care practitioner must be submitted to the Nursing Department prior to returning to the clinical area.

Clinical agencies may have requirements other than those above. If so, students will be instructed to obtain the necessary tests. The student is not allowed to participate in clinical experiences if the medical processing is not completed prior to the start of the clinical rotation.

A student with a health condition (i.e., pregnancy, seizure disorder, HIV positive, diabetes, infectious disease, emotional problems, etc.) that may have a safety consideration must immediately notify the clinical instructor so that assignment modification can be made as necessary. The Department of Nursing has the responsibility to determine those health issues that may interfere with the student's progress in the clinical area.

To ensure success in the program, all students with documented disabilities must inform each nursing instructor at the beginning of each course, so that reasonable accommodations can be made.

Criminal Background Checks for Clinical Placement Policy Required for Nursing Programs

To comply with clinical agency requirements, nursing students are required to have a clear criminal background check to participate in placement(s) at clinical facilities. Background checks are required for registration in clinical nursing courses. The initial background check satisfies this requirement during continuous enrollment in the program. Should your educational process be interrupted, a new background check will be required. Students under 18 years of age are exempt from this requirement.

Associate in Arts Degree Major in Nursing (ADN)

ADN Objectives

Upon completion of the program, the student will have met the following objectives:

  1. Provider of Care
    1. Utilize Roy Adaptation Model to:
      1. Recognize, assess and define the factors influencing the person's/family's adaptive level, adaptive response, and consequent position of the health-illness continuum;
      2. Identify, assess and validate the person's/family's adaptive level and response;
      3. Define patient/client goals based upon a clear analysis and synthesis of data in collaboration with patient, nursing and other disciplines;
      4. Define and perform those nursing interventions which affect the patient/client goals;
      5. Evaluate the consequences of nursing interventions in terms of the person's/family's behavioral change and the achievement of both patient/client and nursing goals, and modify those nursing actions, if desired adaptive outcomes are not achieved.
    2. Utilize the nursing process as a scientific method.
    3. Utilize knowledge of health-illness (normal/disruption) as it pertains to patient/client care.
    4. Demonstrate competency in common nursing procedures.
  2. Communicator
    1. Utilize effective communication skills with clients and peers.
    2. Use communication skills as a method of data collection, nursing intervention and evaluation of care.
    3. Communicate and record assessments, nursing care plans, interventions and evaluations within the protocol of the institution.
  3. Client Teacher
    1. Apply principles of the teaching/learning process.
    2. Develop short-range teaching plans based on the learning process.
  4. Manager of Client Care
    1. Function effectively as a member of health care team.
    2. Utilize basic leadership skills in practice, based on small group patient care management and primary nursing.
  5. Membership within the profession of Nursing
    1. Make judgments based on moral, ethical, and legal principles.
    2. Continue to evaluate and enhance personal and professional behavior.
    3. Assume responsibility for self-development and use resources for continued learning.
    4. Maintain the role of the nurse as a patient advocate.

Upon completion of the program, the student is eligible to take the California State Board examination for registered nurses (R.N.) licensure.

ADN Admission Policy

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements, acceptance into the Department of Nursing is determined by the Admission Committee of the department/program. Admission is based upon a consideration of the student's academic achievement, College Entrance Examination scores and previous college experience (if any).

In order to be eligible for review, applicants must be admitted to the College and then fulfill the nursing admission requirements. Admission to the A.D.N. Program is considered for the fall semester and for spring semester with a specific deadline for each semester. Admission is based on:

  • Completed application form
  • Cumulative GPA
  • Science GPA
  • Letters of reference
  • Passing score on the nursing entrance examination

Personal interviews may be scheduled for qualified applicants admitted directly to the A.D.N. Program. Students admitted as Pre-Nursing will not be asked to interview until the point of admission into the nursing program.

Priority is given to students who:

  • Meet the required criteria.
  • Have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 for all transferable college work attempted.
  • A GPA of 2.50 for college science courses is required for admission to the nursing program. The science GPA will consist of grades received from anatomy, physiology, and microbiology.
  • A student may repeat a course required for the nursing major no more than once. Failure (C- and below) of any two required science or pre-requisite courses results in non-admission.
  • A student may repeat the nursing entrance examination no more than once. Failure to meet the required benchmark results in non-admission.

Candidates who have 30 units of general studies requirements completed (except RST 41) prior to admission may be admitted into the first year of the nursing program.

LVNs who have met the admission requirements for the ADN program must give written notification to the director of the program of their intent to pursue the Mobility Option upon admission in the program. In the Mobility Option, LVNs are awarded 15 units of nursing course credits (NUR 23-27, 30) upon satisfactory completion of the NLN Mobility Exam at a score of 80% or above and satisfactory demonstration of skills competency. There is a fee associated with this test option. Completion of NUR 20 is required for continuation in the LVN Mobility Option.

A non-degree option is available for LVNs who meet the college entrance requirements. The student is eligible to take the NCLEX-RN examination for the registered nurse licensure after completing 29 units of prescribed courses. The student is not awarded a degree from Mount St. Mary's College. Entrance interview with the Program Director is required for this option.

Candidates with previous Registered Nursing education may be given transfer credit for previous nursing courses equivalent to the Nursing Department courses. Admission of these candidates will be on a probationary status. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better in the nursing courses for admission consideration. A minimum of 18 units of nursing courses must be completed during the last two semesters at Mount St. Mary's College. Candidates who have taken courses related to nursing with a theoretical foundation and are currently practicing in the healthcare setting (i.e., CNA, Respiratory Tech, Hemodialysis Tech, LPT) may challenge specific courses. The student must make an appointment with the Program Director to discuss this option and his/her qualifications.

ADN Academic Policy

The faculty of the Department of Nursing has the right and the responsibility for judging and evaluating the quality of the student's achievement, both in the mastery of theoretical content and in clinical competence.

Notice of academic difficulty, probation, or dismissal is used when deemed necessary. A grade below C (2.0) in a course (Nursing or General Education) is considered a failed course and must be repeated. A student may have only one failed course during the entire nursing program. A student may repeat only one failed course in the entire program. A second failed course or a failed repeated course results in dismissal from the program. A failure of more than one course in a series of courses (e.g., NUR 24, 24A, 24L, 25) taken concurrently, counts as one failed course. If a student's level of clinical practice is unsatisfactory or unsafe, the student may fail before the end of the semester.

Readmission may be granted by special action of the A.D.N. Admission Committee of the ADN Department. Readmission of a student who was dismissed from the nursing program due to unsafe practice is not permitted.

Prior to admission to the ADN program, a nursing entrance examination is administered, i.e., ATI TEAS test. The score benchmark for the A.D.N. program as determined by the ATI norming process must be achieved. Students who score below the passing score are recommended to utilize a remediation program prior to retaking the test. A student may retest only once. The purpose of this test is to determine the student's knowledge related to math, English, sciences and critical thinking.

During the clinical portion of the program, students must carry malpractice insurance, have a current CPR card (American Heart Association (AHA) Health Care Provider or BCLS/Professional Rescuer CPR), and an LA City fire safety card.

Dosage Calculation Examination: Accurate calculation of drug dosages is a skill that is necessary for the safe and effective practice of nursing. Serious harm to a client can result from math errors. Incorrectly calculated or measured dosages are the leading cause of error in the administration of medications. A drug error is a violation of a client's rights. Therefore, it is extremely important that nurses and nursing students demonstrate competence in such calculations. A dosage calculations exam will be given regularly throughout the curriculum. A minimum 100% score is required on this test. If a score of less than 100% is achieved, a second test will be given. The second test must be passed with 100% proficiency to remain in this course. If unsuccessful on the second attempt the student must drop the theory, skills lab, and clinical courses for that session. If in a subsequent course the math proficiency test is not passed at the 100% benchmark, the student may be disqualified from the program.

Nursing AA Degree Curriculum Requirements ADN Program

Prerequisite Requirements for A.D.N. Program

Pre-Nursing

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

*BIO 50A

Human Anatomy

(3)

*BIO 50AL

Human Anatomy Lab

(1)

*BIO 50B

Human Physiology

(3)

*BIO 50BL

Human Physiology Lab

(1)

*BIO 3

General Microbiology

(3)

*BIO 3L

General Microbiology Lab

(1)

ENG 1A

Written and Oral Communication

(3)

ENG 1B or 1C

Freshman English

 

(3)

SPE 10

Introduction to Communication

(2)

PSY 1

General Psychology

(3)

PSY 12

Developmental Psychology

(3)

PHIL 10

Critical Thinking

(3)

**RST 41

Christian Ethics

(3)

SOC 1

Introduction to Sociology

(3)

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

*Must have been completed within five years prior to admission

**Must be completed within the first academic year in the nursing program or if transferred in prior to admissions must meet the nursing department requirements for bioethics as an upper division course.

Total units: 41

AA Degree Curriculum Requirements A.D.N. Program

First Year

NUR 20

Adaptation Model Nursing Theory

(2)

NUR 23, 23L

Principles and Practice of Nursing Skills

(2, 1)

NUR 24, 26

Adult Adaptation Nursing I, II

(2, 2)

NUR 24A, 24L

Medical-Surgical Principles and Practice of Skills I

(0.5, 0.5)

NUR 26A, 26L

Medical-Surgical Principles and Practice of Skills II

(0.5, 0.5)

NUR 25, 27

Medical-Surgical Practicum I, II

(2, 2)

NUR 28

Adult and Adolescent Mental Health Adaptation

(2)

NUR 28A

Principles & Practice of Advanced Interpersonal Skills

(1)

NUR 29

Mental Health Practicum

(2)

NUR 30

Pharmacology

(2)

NUR 31

Children: Adaptation

(2)

NUR 32

Children: Practicum

(2)

 

Total units: 25

Summer
Specialties are subject to change at times when a specialty is offered. During the summer session a Community Focus will be required.

NUR 34

Community Health Nursing

(1)

and depending the speciality, Community Focused Care will be required:

NUR 32A or NUR 36A or NUR 38A

Com. Focused Care:Children

Com. Focused Care:Childbearing

Com. Focused Care: Gerontology

 

(1)

Total units: 2

Second Year

NUR 33

Professional and Management Issues in Nursing

(2)

NUR 35

Childbearing: Adaptation

(2)

NUR 36

Childbearing: Practicum

(2)

NUR 37

Gerontological Nursing

(2)

NUR 38

Gerontological Nursing Practicum

(2)

NUR 46

Adult Adaptation Nursing III

(2)

NUR 47

Medical-Surgical Practicum III

(2)

NUR 48

Professional Nursing Practicum

(2)

Total units: 16

Total units for Associate of Arts Degree in Nursing:85

LVN Mobility Option Curriculum Requirement ADN Program

Prerequisites to beginning nursing courses for LVNs are the same AA Degree Curriculum Requirements

Same as AA Degree curriculum requirement.

Total units: 41

First Year A.D.N. Program

NUR 20

Adaptation Model Nursing Theory

(2)

NUR 28

Adult and Adolescent Mental Health Adaptation

(2)

NUR 28A

Principles & Practice of Advanced Interpersonal Skills

(1)

NUR 29

Mental Health Practicum

(2)

NUR 31

Children: Adaptation

(2)

NUR 32

Children: Practicum

(2)

Total units: 11

Summer

Specialties

(2)


Second Year A.D.N. Program

NUR 33

Professional and Management Issues in Nursing

(2)

NUR 35

Childbearing: Adaptation

(2)

NUR 36

Childbearing: Practicum

(2)

NUR 37

Gerontological Nursing

(2)

NUR 38

Gerontological Nursing Practicum

(2)

NUR 46

Adult Adaptation Nursing III

(2)

NUR 47

Medical-Surgical Practicum III

(2)

NUR 48

Professional Nursing Practicum

(2)

Total units: 16

Total units for Associate of Arts Degree in Nursing:65

LVN 30 Units Non-Degree Option Curriculum Requirement

First Year

BIO 50B

Human Physiology

(3)

BIO 50BL

Human Physiology Lab

(1)

BIO 3

General Microbiology

(3)

BIO 3L

General Microbiology Lab

(1)

NUR 20

Adaptation Model Nursing Theory

(2)

NUR 28

Adult and Adolescent Mental Health Adaptation

(2)

NUR 28A

Principles / Practice of Advanced Interpersonal Skills

(1)

NUR 29

Mental Health Practicum

(2)

NUR 30

Pharmacology

(2)

Total units: 17

Second Year

NUR 33

Professional and Management Issues in Nursing

(2)

NUR 37

Gerontological Nursing

(2)

NUR 38

Gerontological Nursing Practicum

(2)

NUR 46

Adult Adaptation Nursing III

(2)

NUR 47

Medical-Surgical Practicum III

(2)

NUR 48

Professional Nursing Practicum

(2)

Total units: 12

Total units required for California RN Licensure Exam: 29

Nursing Courses

NUR 20 Adaptation Model Nursing Theory (2)

Introduction of the Roy Adaptation Model as a theoretical framework for nursing practice. Emphasis is on nursing process according to adaptation theory, with integration of physiological and psychosocial modes of adaptation in the adult population. GS-VIIA

NUR 23/23L Principles and Practice of Nursing Skills (2,1)

This course introduces theoretical foundation for basic assessment skills including interviewing (beginning communication skills), observation, basic physical assessment, vital signs measurement. The course also introduces basic nursing skills and interventions necessary for safe patient care, including sterile techniques, concepts of infection control, and basic hygiene care. The concurrent clinical component in the Skills Lab focuses on development of associated psychomotor skills introduced in NUR 23. Prerequisite: NUR 20 or concurrent enrollment with NUR 20.

NUR 24 Adult Adaptation Nursing I (2)

This course involves an Adaptation Process approach focusing on the Physiologic Mode of adult population. The course focuses on beginning adaptation problems of oxygenation, nutrition, activity/rest, elimination and protection needs of the patient. The impact of physiological processes of fluid and electrolytes, neurological, endocrine, sensory system in adaptation is discussed. Prerequisite: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, or concurrent enrollment with NUR 30.

NUR 24A/24L Medical-Surgical Principles and Practice of Skills I (.5, .5)

Introduction of skills for nursing interventions related to medication administration, management of mobility problems, management of nutritional problems, management of elimination problems, and fluid management. Prerequisite: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30 or concurrent enrollment with NUR 30.

NUR 24E Nursing Elective (1)

This course is offered to students during the summer session who need one unit of academic course work to be eligible for financial aid. The course focuses on the protection mode of the Roy Adaptation Model. The role of the nurse as patient advocate and environmental safety issues are explored in various healthcare settings. Credit/No Credit. Must be enrolled with NUR 24 to be eligible for the course.

NUR 25 Medical-Surgical Practicum I (2)

This first medical-surgical practicum introduces the student to the care of the adult hospitalized patient with common medical-surgical problems. Experience is provided in a variety of hospital settings and with patients who are at various points along the health-illness continuum. The focus of this course is the application of concepts from Adult Adaptation I (NUR 24) and Medical-Surgical Principles and Practice of Nursing Skills (NUR 24A/24L). Prerequisite: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, or concurrent enrollment with NUR 30. NUR 24, 24A/24L, 25 are taken concurrently and must be passed successfully before progressing.

NUR 26 Adult Adaptation Nursing II (2)

The second medical-surgical course focuses on advanced adaptation problems of oxygenation, nutrition, activity/rest, elimination and protection needs of the patient and incorporates the psychosocial modes in applying the Adaptation Model. The impact of physiological processes of fluid and electrolytes, neurological, endocrine, sensory system in adaptation is discussed. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25.

NUR 26A/26L Medical-Surgical Principles and Practice of Skills II (.5, .5)

Introduction of skills for nursing interventions related to IV insertion and central line management; blood therapies; airway and oxygenation management. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25.

NUR 27 Medical-Surgical Nursing Practicum II (2)

This second medical-surgical practicum provides the student with experience in the care of the adult hospitalized patient with common medical-surgical problems. Experience is provided in a variety of hospital settings and with patients who are at various points along the health-illness continuum. The focus of this course is the application of concepts from Adult Adaptation II (NUR 26) and Medical-Surgical Principles and Practice of Nursing Skills (NUR 26A/26L). Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25. NUR 26, 26A/26L, 27 are taken concurrently and must be passed successfully before progressing.

NUR 28 Adult and Adolescent Mental Health Adaptation (2)

This course introduces the student to an array of mental health problems of adolescent, adult, and geriatric population. The focus of the course is the psychosocial impact of health-illness problems and its adaptation process. The course addresses legal and social issues of the mentally ill and provides students with available resources for interventions. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25.

NUR 28A Principles & Practice of Advanced Interpersonal Skills (1)

This course introduces the students to basic and advanced therapeutic communications skills. Dynamics of interpersonal relationships and assertiveness principles are addressed. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25.

NUR 29 Mental Health Practicum (2)

This course provides the student with experiences interacting with adolescent, adult, and geriatric population with mental health illness. The focus of the course is the psychosocial impact of health-illness problems and its adaptation process and application of concepts from Adult and Adolescent Mental Health Adaptation (NUR 28) and Principles and Practice of Advanced Interpersonal Skills (NUR 28A). Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25. NUR 28, 28A, 29 are taken concurrently and must be passed successfully before progressing.

NUR 30 Pharmacology (2)

This course presents pharmacology as related to treatment of pathological processes. Major drug classes and mechanisms of drug actions as well as nursing implications are covered. NUR 20 or concurrent enrollment with NUR 20, or concurrent enrollment with NUR 24, 24A, 24L, 25. GS-VIIA

NUR 31 Children: Adaptation (2)

This course introduces the student to health problems of children and the impact on the family unit. The focus of the course is the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems and its adaptation process. The course addresses legal and social issues of children and provides students with available resources for interventions. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29.

NUR 32A Community Focused Care: Children (1)

The course provides community care experience of the children, focusing on bio-psycho-social impact of health related problems. Experience is provided in a variety of non-hospital settings, such as ambulatory mobile unit. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29.

NUR 32 Children: Practicum (2)

The course provides clinical experience of children, focusing on bio-psycho-social impact of health related problems in an acute care setting. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25,26, 26A.26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29. NUR 31, 32, 32A are taken concurrently and must be passed successfully before progressing.

NUR 33 Professional and Management Issues in Nursing (2)

The course examines issues faced by professional nurses in providing health care, focusing on the roles of the professional nurse. It also addresses beginning concepts of leadership role in discussing principles of leadership and management. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 28, 28A, 29, 31, 32A, 32, 35, 36A, 36, 37, 38A, 38, 46, 47.

NUR 34 Community Health Nursing (1)

This course provides students with theoretical foundation of Community Health Nursing principles focusing on bio-psycho-social impact of health related problems in the community setting.

Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29.

NUR 35 Childbearing: Adaptation (2)

This course introduces the student to health problems of the childbearing adult and the impact on the family unit. The focus of the course is the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems and its adaptation process. The course addresses legal and social issues of childbearing and provides students with available resources for interventions. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29.

NUR 36A Community Focused Care: Childbearing (1)

The course provides community care experience of the childbearing adult, focusing on bio-psycho-social impact of health related problems. Experience is provided in a variety of non-

hospital settings, such as ambulatory setting. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29.

NUR 36 Childbearing: Practicum (2)

The course provides clinical experience of the childbearing adult, focusing on bio-psycho-social impact of health related problems in an acute care setting. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 28, 28A, 29. NUR 35, 36, 36A are taken concurrently and must be passed successfully before progressing.

NUR 37 Gerontological Nursing: Adaptation (2)

This course introduces the student to multiple and chronic health problems of the geriatric population. The focus of the course is the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems and its adaptation process. The course addresses legal and social issues of the older adults and provides students with available resources for interventions. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29.

NUR 38A Community Focused Care: Gerontology (1)

The course provides community-care experience of the older adults, focusing on bio-psycho-social impact of aging and health related problems. Experience is provided in a variety of non-hospital settings, such as Meals-on-Wheels program and residential settings.

Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29.

NUR 38 Gerontological Nursing: Practicum (2)

The course provides clinical experience of older adults, focusing on bio-psycho-social impact of health related problems in a long-term setting. The course also will experience the manager role of the RN. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29. NUR 37, 38, 38A are taken concurrently and must be passed successfully before advancing.

NUR 46 Adult Adaptation Nursing III (2)

This course introduces the student to health problems of acute, complex, multi-system health problems of adults. The focus of the course is the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems and its adaptation process. Nursing interventions focus on acute medical and nursing management of adults. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29, 31, 32, 32A, 35, 36, 36A, 37, 38, 38A.

NUR 47 Medical-Surgical Nursing Practicum III (2)

The course provides clinical experience of acute, complex, multi-system management of adults in an acute care setting. Focus of care is on bio-psycho-social impact of acute health problems on an individual and the family. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25,26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29, 31, 32, 32A, 35, 36, 36A, 37, 38, 38A. NUR 46, 47 are taken concurrently and must be passed successfully before progressing.

NUR 48 Professional Nursing Practicum (2)

The course provides an internship experience in applying leadership and management principles in an acute care settings. Focus of care is on developing clinical and leadership skills of a beginning professional nurse. A group of students is assigned to a preceptor/mentor of the assigned unit during the experience. Prerequisites: NUR 20, 23/23L, 30, 24, 24A/24L, 25, 26, 26A/26L, 27, 28, 28A, 29, 31, 32, 32A, 35, 36, 36A, 37, 38, 38A, 46, 47.

NUR 98 Independent Studies (1-3)

Independent investigation of significant problems in nursing. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

NUR 99 Special Studies in Nursing (1-3)

Selected problems; offered as a course or seminar on current issues in nursing. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Bachelor of Science Degree Major in Nursing

BSN Objectives

At the completion of the baccalaureate nursing program, the graduate will have met the following objectives and will:

  1. Utilize the Roy Adaptation Model as a scientific method to deliver nursing care to persons, families, and groups.
  2. Utilize knowledge of health/illness continuum to advocate for and maximize health of persons, families and groups.
  3. Use critical thinking, knowledge, and skills obtained from nursing and liberal arts courses to provide professional nursing care in a variety of settings.
  4. Utilize and apply complex, effective communication skills to persons, families, and groups.
  5. Develop and implement individualized teaching/learning plans for persons, families, and groups.
  6. Utilize leadership skills based on the principles of management, delegation, change process, group process, and systems theory in health care settings.
  7. Utilize research findings to guide practice in health care delivery.
  8. Critically examine and integrate the principles of moral, ethical, and legal issues which influence health care.
  9. Create interventions that consider a variety of influencing factors: e.g., culture, religion, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.
  10. Establish independent and interdependent roles which will enhance professional growth.

Upon the completion of the Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Nursing, the student is eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and is also qualified to apply for the Public Health Nursing Certificate issued by the California Board of Registered Nursing.

BSN Program Essential Performance Standards

Background:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 was instituted by Congress to prohibit discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. Schools of nursing and state university systems, like other state and federally funded entities, are required to comply with the stipulations of the ADA. The ADA defines a qualified individual with a disability as an individual with a disability who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the employment position that such individual holds or desires. In addition, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination in admissions of a qualified person with disabilities.

ADA and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 eligibility requirements vary depending on the type of services, activities, and functions needed in particular areas. The practice of nursing is an applied discipline with cognitive, sensory, affective, and motor components. Hence, students must be able to perform the functions which are necessary for the safe practice of nursing and essential to the licensing standards with or without reasonable accommodations in order to be admitted to or progress in the BSN program at Mount St. Mary's College.

Core Performance Standards:

  1. Ability to think critically, such that the student can begin to make clinical decisions, identify cause-and-effect relationships with clinical data, and develop nursing care plans.
  2. Ability to demonstrate interpersonal abilities such that the student can appropriately interact with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds.
  3. Ability to clearly communicate in verbal and written forms such that students can communicate nursing actions, interpret client responses, initiate health teaching, document and understand nursing activities, and interact with clients, staff and faculty supervisors.
  4. Ability to maneuver in small spaces and move from one place to another such that the student can move around in clients' rooms and bathrooms, into and out of work spaces, access treatment areas, and procure needed emergency materials when indicated. While health care agencies must meet ADA physical access standards, potential clients with equipment may limit the amount of available space in which to move.
  5. Ability to demonstrate gross and fine motor skills sufficient to provide safe and effective nursing care such that the student can move and position clients in and out of bed, ambulate and transport patients, calibrate and use equipment, and perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
  6. Ability to hear well enough to monitor and assess clients' health needs such that the student can hear cries for help, alarms on equipment, emergency signals, breath and heart sounds on auscultation, and various overhead codes.
  7. Ability to see well enough to observe and assess clients' health status and changes in condition such that the student could see grimacing, movement, changes in skin color, rashes, and other observed client changes or responses.
  8. Ability to have tactile capabilities sufficient for physical assessment such that the student could successfully perform palpation, note changes in skin temperature, perform skills related to therapeutic activities and identify by touch other changes in client condition.

Credit for policy given to Point Loma Nazarene College printed with permission from Point Loma Nazarene College

BSN Program Health Policies

Nursing focuses on prevention and promotion of health. Students admitted to and progressing through the BSN Program are strongly encouraged to engage in health practices which model those they are teaching to patients. Prior to enrollment in the first nursing course, students will be informed of the BSN health policies.

Every student admitted to nursing courses must have completed the following health data. Clinical agencies will not accept a student who has not met all of the following health requirements:

  • Past medical history on which the student attests that physical and emotional health are such as to allow for full participation in both clinical and theoretical components of the nursing curriculum.
  • Physical examination, including a visual screening, urinalysis, and complete blood count, must be completed by a licensed physician, certified nurse practitioner, or physician's assistant annually.
  • A two-step PPD/Mantoux skin test for Tuberculosis is required on admission to the nursing program. Then annual testing is required. If the student tests positive or has previously tested positive, a chest x-ray is required every year.
  • Polio – Series of three doses for those under 18 years of age.
  • Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR) – If born in 1957 or later, the student must have two doses, with at least one since 1980. Students born prior to 1957 may either have one dose or demonstrate proof of immunity through titers or have two doses.
  • One time dose of Tetanus/Diphtheria/acellular Pertussis (Tdap) as a replacement for the Tetanus and Diphtheria (Td) booster. Do not repeat Td as an alternative.
  • Hepatitis B – Unless the student can demonstrate immunity through a titer, all nursing majors must have completed at least two of three injections prior to beginning clinical. Students must comply with Hepatitis B series injections and titers in accordance with CDC and MSMC guidelines.
  • Flu vaccines may be required as per CDC, MSMC guidelines, and agency requirements.

Required titers

  • Measles: demonstrate immunity through serological testing or be immunized for rubella, rubeola, mumps.
  • Varicella (chicken pox) Titer: If the result is negative, two doses of a varicella vaccine are required one month apart.
  • Hepatitis B Titer: After the third injection of the hepatitis B series is completed, the student must demonstrate proof of immunity. A Hepatitis IGG AB titer is drawn a minimum of 30 days after the 3rd injection is received. If the titer is negative, students must comply with MSMC Health Policies and CDC guidelines regarding additional injections and titers.
  • If a student is not able to comply with these health requirements, the student must obtain a written statement to this effect from her/his physician and submit it to the BSN Program for consideration.

Students have the responsibility of disclosing any temporary medical condition which may hamper their ability to perform the Essential Performance Standards. A written medical release from their health care practitioner must be submitted to the BSN Program Director prior to returning to the clinical area.

Clinical agencies may have requirements other than those above. If so, students will be instructed to obtain the necessary tests.

A student with a health condition (i.e., pregnancy, seizure disorder, HIV positive, diabetes, infectious disease, emotional problems, etc.) that may have a safety consideration must immediately notify the clinical instructor so that assignment modification can be made as necessary. The BSN Program has the responsibility to determine those health issues that may interfere with the student's progress in the clinical area. To ensure success in the program, all students with documented disabilities must inform each nursing instructor at the beginning of each course, so that reasonable accommodations can be made.

Criminal Background Checks

To comply with clinical agency requirements, nursing students are required to have a clear criminal background check to participate in placement(s) at clinical facilities. Background checks are required for registration in clinical nursing courses. The initial background check satisfies this requirement during continuous enrollment in the program unless otherwise specified by a clinical agency. Should your educational process be interrupted, a new background check will be required. Students under 18 years of age are exempt from this requirement.

BSN Program Academic Policies

The BSN program is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The faculty of the BSN Program has the right and the responsibility for evaluating the quality of the student's achievement, both in the mastery of theoretical content and in clinical competence. Mid-term warning, probation, or dismissal is used when deemed necessary. The following academic policies apply:

  • A grade of C- or below in a required course or a nursing theory course is not accepted. If the grade of C- or below is in a nursing theory course, non-progression in the program occurs.
  • A student may repeat a nursing theory course required for the nursing major no more than once.
  • A grade of no credit in a nursing clinical course or failure of any two required nursing courses results in dismissal from the nursing program.
  • If a student's level of clinical practice is unsatisfactory or unsafe, the student may fail before the end of the semester. Readmission may be granted by special action of the BSN Admission Committee.
  • Once admitted and enrolled in the College, all BSN nursing students will be required to successfully complete PHI 168A or B or RST 149 at MSMC. In order to meet the BSN program requirements for bioethics, any bioethics course transferred in prior to admission must be an upper division course.

Departmental policy statements regarding grading, mathematical competence, clinical progression, incomplete grades, probation, absences, dismissal, and readmission to the program are provided to the student at the beginning of the nursing major. During the clinical portion of the program, students must:

  • Ordinarily be enrolled full-time (see Tuition and Fees).
  • Carry malpractice insurance.
  • Have a current CPR card (AHA Health Care Provider BLS).
  • Have a fire safety card.
  • Complete a criminal background as outlined in clinical policies.
  • Complete a First Aid Course prior to beginning senior level coursework.
  • Have membership in the National Student Nurse Association, highly recommended.
  • Nursing classes are held at multiple sites. Transportation is the responsibility of each student. Senior year students who drive are required to have a current driver's license and auto insurance. Information on all policies and procedures can be obtained from the Traditional BSN Coordinator of Advisement and Testing or the Accelerated BSN Program Coordinator.
  • Certain health requirements must be met prior to clinical experiences. The requirements are provided to students in admission packets and in the BSN Student Handbook.
  • In addition to the College Baccalaureate degree requirements, students who re-enter the BSN program after an absence of seven (7) years or more must complete all requirements of the BSN Program and the level to which they are re-enrolling.

Clinical Agencies/Scheduling

Multiple agencies are used for clinical practice and include the following: private and public acute and subacute health care facilities, community health sites, and public and community health care agencies.

Schedules for clinical and class times are subject to change and may include evenings and weekends.

Traditional BSN Program Admission Policy

Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements, acceptance into the BSN Program is determined by the BSN Admission Committee. Admission is based upon a consideration of the student's academic achievement. There is a formal review of the student's high school achievement record, grade point average, College Entrance Examination scores, previous college experience (if any). Students who intend to major in nursing are advised to take high school chemistry.

In order to be eligible for review, applicants must be admitted to the College and then fulfill the nursing admission requirements. Admission to the sophomore nursing courses is considered for the fall semester only and is based on:

  • Cumulative GPA: 2.7 or higher
  • Science GPA: 2.5 or higher
  • English GPA
  • Written essay
  • Entrance Exam
  • Personal interviews may be scheduled for qualified applicants.
  • A student may repeat a course required for the nursing major no more than once. Failure (C- and below) of any two required science or pre-requisite courses results in non-admission.

Priority is given to students who:

  • Meet the required criteria and who have completed 25 units or more at Mount St. Mary's College.

LVN to BSN Admission Policy

LVNs that have been accepted by the College and have completed the general studies requirements of the first two years may challenge sophomore level nursing courses and move directly into junior level nursing courses. NUR 41 must be satisfactorily completed prior to acceptance into junior level nursing courses. A non-degree program is available for LVNs who meet the College entrance requirements. After completing 30 units of prescribed courses, the student is eligible to take the NCLEX-RN for licensure as a Registered Nurse but is not considered a graduate of Mount St. Mary's College.

RN to BSN Admission Policy

Registered Nurses who apply to the BSN program may be given transfer credit for previous nursing courses equivalent to the sophomore and junior level nursing courses. Validation of clinical competence and completion of NUR 41 are required prior to entry into the program. In addition, applicants need to meet college admission requirements and BSN program admission policies for RN to BSN applicants.

BSN Curriculum Requirements

Freshman Year

**CHE 3/PHS 1

Chemistry/Scientific Concepts

(3)

**BIO 50A

Human Anatomy

(4)

**BIO 50B

Human Physiology

(4)

**BIO 3

General Microbiology

(4)

*PSY 1

General Psychology

(3)

*SOC 1

Introduction to Sociology

(3)

*ENG 1A and 1B or 1C

Freshman English

(6)

*SPE 10

Public Speaking

(2)

*PSY 12

Developmental Lifespan Psychology

(3)

***SPR 85

Intro to College Studies

(1)

SPR 71X

Preparation for Nursing

(1)

Total units: 32-34

Sophomore Year

*NUR 51

Practicum: Adult Medical/Surgical

(4)

*NUR 53A

Fundamentals of Nursing: Theory

(2)

*NUR 53B/C

Fundamentals of Nursing: Skills

(1.5,1)

*NUR 54

Introduction to Pathophysiology

(3 )

*NUR 60

Adaptation Nursing Theory

(3)

*NUR 61

Practicum: Adult Medical Surgical

(4)

*NUR 65

Adaptation Nursing: Adult Medical/Surgical

(3)

*BIO 112

Human Nutrition

(3)

*PHI 21/RST 41

Moral Values and Ethical Decisions

(3)

GS VA

Religious Studies Requirement

(3)

GS-IIIA:

Art or Music

(3)

Total units: 33.5

Junior Year

*NUR 135

Pharmacology in Nursing

(2)

*NUR 160

Adaptation Nursing: Childbearing Family

(2.5)

*NUR 161

Practicum: Childbearing Family

(2.5)

*NUR 162

Adaptation Nursing: Children

(2.5)

*NUR 163

Practicum: Children

(2.5)

*NUR 164

Adaptation Nursing: Advanced Medical/Surgical

(2.5)

*NUR 165

Practicum: Advanced Medical/Surgical Nursing

(2.5)

*NUR 166

Adaptation Nursing: Mental Health

(2.5)

*NUR 167

Practicum: Mental Health

(2.5)

*PHI 168A or PHI 168B or RST 149 (upper division)

Bioethics

(3)

GS-IIIB:

Literature

(3)

GS-IIIC:

History

(3)

Total units: 31

Senior Year

*NUR 134

Issues in Professional Nursing

(2)

*NUR 136

Abuse: Child to Elder

(1)

*NUR 138

Nursing Research

(3)

*NUR 178

Adaptation Nursing: Senior Preceptorship

(1.5)

*NUR 179

Practicum: Senior Preceptorship

(2.5)

*NUR 180

Adaptation Nursing: Community Health

(1.5)

*NUR 181

Practicum: Community Health Nursing

(2.5)

*NUR 182

Adaptation Nursing: Leadership and Management

(1.5)

*NUR 183

Practicum: Nursing Leadership and Management

(2.5)

*NUR 190

Adaptation Nursing: Older Adult

(1.5)

*NUR 191

Practicum: Older Adult

(2.5)

GS-VA/B

Philosophy or Religious Studies

(3)

GS-IIIG:

Econ/ Politics

(3)

See Catalog

Philosophical Ideas

(3)

Total units: 31

Total units for Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing: 127.5

*Courses required by the Department of Nursing

**Must have been completed within five years prior to admission

***Not required for students entering MSMC with over 24 transferable units

Traditional BSN Nursing Courses

NUR 51 Practicum: Adult (4)

Clinical practice of nursing process and skills with application of concepts related to basic nursing skills and to common disruptions in body systems. Focus on common medical-surgical problems affecting adults and older adults, stimuli for illness, nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, prevention, and teaching in an in-patient setting. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Sophomore standing.

NUR 53A Fundamentals of Nursing: Theory (2)

Introductory course that covers the theories, concepts, principles and procedures that are fundamental to current nursing practice. Provides a knowledge base to understand the practice of professional nursing with a focus on the adult hospitalized patient. Sophomore standing.

NUR 53B/C Fundamentals of Nursing: Skills (1.5/1.0)

Covers basic nursing measures necessary for safe patient care. The focus is to provide the theoretical basis for selected nursing skills and to develop the student's psychomotor ability in the performance of these skills. Designed to integrate computer assisted learning for an independent approach to learning. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Sophomore standing.

NUR 54 Introduction to Pathophysiology (3)

Basic pathophysiological mechanisms of disease and selected medical-surgical disruptions of protection and oxygenation that are common to adults are presented for discussion. Patient care management is included. Sophomore standing.

NUR 60 Adaptation Nursing Theory (3)

Introduces the Roy Adaptation Model of Nursing with emphasis on the physiological and psychosocial modes as related to adult and older adult behaviors. Introduces concepts of cultural diversity, aging, and sexuality. Sophomore standing.

NUR 61 Practicum: Adult (4)

Continuation of the Nursing Skills and Process with application of concepts related to the physiologic and psychosocial mode of adaptation. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Sophomore standing.

NUR 65 Adaptation Nursing: Adult Medical/Surgical (3)

Common disruptions in the body's structure, function and regulatory mechanisms are presented which include immune response, inflammation, and temperature control. Nursing and Medical Management will be discussed. Sophomore standing.

NUR 98 Independent Studies (1-3)

Independent investigation of significant problems in nursing. Prerequisite:Consent of instructor.

NUR 99 Special Studies in Nursing (1-3)

Selected problems; offered as a course or seminar on current issues in nursing. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NUR 134 Issues in Professional Nursing (2)

The focus is on the profession of Nursing. Content includes the history of nursing, the Nursing Practice Act, legal aspects, liability, and other current issues affecting the nursing profession. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the NUR 160 series.

NUR 135 Pharmacology in Nursing (2)

Pharmacology as related to pathological processes and various groups of clients is presented, major drug classes and mechanisms of drug actions as well as nursing implications are detailed. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the NUR 50, 60 series. GS-VIIA (Satisfies two QL1 units.)

NUR 136 Abuse: Child to Elder Adult (1)

Child, elder and women's abuse will be covered. Included will be prevention, early detection, and intervention techniques. California reporting requirements for child abuse will be covered.

NUR 138 Research (3)

Principles of scientific methods, research designs appropriate to nursing, ethical conduct in human subject research, and components of theoretical frameworks are presented. Emphasis on understanding, critiquing, and applying published research findings to clinical practice. Prerequisite: Successful completion of NUR 160 series. Student must be in Senior standing. GS-II, VIIA (Satisfies one QL unit.)

NUR 160 Adaptation Nursing: Childbearing Family (2.5)

Lecture. The focus is the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems related to childbearing families. Taken concurrently with NUR 161. Junior standing. GS-VI

NUR 161 Practicum: Childbearing Family (2.5)

Provides clinical experience in prenatal, delivery, and postnatal care, study of the parenting roles, and the health needs of the emerging family groups. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 160. Junior standing.

NUR 162 Adaptation Nursing: Children (2.5)

Lecture. The focus is the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems related to children. Taken concurrently with NUR 163. Junior standing. GS- VIIA (Satisfies one QL unit.)

NUR 163 Practicum: Children (2.5)

Provides clinical experience in the health-illness problems encountered in the care of children and their families. Growth and development from infancy through adolescence in terms of the Adaptation Theory of Nursing. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 162. Junior standing.

NUR 164 Adaptation Nursing: Advanced Medical/Surgical (2.5)

Lecture. The focus is the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems related to complex episodic medical or surgical disruptions in the adult. Leadership and patient care management included. Taken concurrently with NUR 165. Junior Standing.

NUR 165 Practicum: Advanced Medical/Surgical (2.5)

Provides clinical experience in the health-illness problems of adult patients with more complex medical or surgical disruptions. Leadership and patient care management included. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 164. Junior standing.

NUR 166 Adaptation Nursing: Mental Health (2.5)

Lecture. The focus is the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems related to mental health of individuals and groups. Taken concurrently with NUR 167. Junior Standing

NUR 167 Practicum: Mental Health (2.5)

Provides clinical experience in the application of the principles and concepts related to psycho-social problems in psychiatric settings. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 166. Junior standing.

NUR 178 Adaptation Nursing: Senior Preceptorship (1.5)

Lecture. Theory in this senior level course is applicable to any area of nursing specialty. Bio-psycho-social and spiritual approaches will be used to present concepts that the Baccalaureate prepared nurse can apply to promote adaptation in individuals, families, and groups. Broad topics include palliative care, communication, diversity, pain and symptom management, integrative therapies, and loss, grief and bereavement. Taken concurrently with NUR 179. Senior standing.

NUR 179 Practicum: Senior Preceptorship (2.5)

The senior level student will continue to develop and practice the role of the Baccalaureate prepared nurse in this practicum. The student will have the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to apply the theory content from NUR 178/158 and the MSMC Nursing Baccalaureate Program Objectives. A variety of clinical agencies and nursing specialties will be used. The Roy Adaptation Model will be used as the foundation of professional nursing practice. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 178. Senior standing.

NUR 180 Adaptation Nursing: Community Health (1.5)

Lecture. Theories and concepts from nursing and public health are presented from a bio-psycho-social perspective. The focus is on the health of the population, as well as on individuals, families and groups living in the community. The Roy Adaptation Model is threaded throughout the broad topics, which include community oriented practice, family, community assessment, epidemiology and communicable disease. Taken concurrently with NUR 181. Senior standing.

NUR 181 Practicum: Community Health Nursing (2.5)

Provides a clinical experience for the senior level student to use the Roy Adaptation Model to improve the health of individuals, families, groups and the community as a whole. An epidemiological approach is utilized to identify and assess problems within aggregates in the community. A variety of populations and settings are used in order to provide the student with the opportunity to apply the theories and concepts from NUR 180. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 180. Senior standing.

NUR 182 Adaptation Nursing: Leadership/Management (1.5)

Theory in this senior level 1.5 unit course is designed to analyze leadership and management principles and illustrate how these concepts reflect professional nursing practice. The health care delivery environment will be discussed with an emphasis on the current and future trends in the management of nursing resources and personnel. The Roy Adaptation Model and systems theory is threaded through each topic and will be used to evaluate individuals, groups and organizations on how they work together. Taken concurrently with NUR 183.

Senior standing.

NUR 183 Practicum: Nursing Leadership/Management (2.5)

This clinical course provides the senior level student the opportunity to assess and practice under supervision the principles of leadership and management with a variety of populations in various settings. In addition, a conference will be utilized to simulate situations to enhance students' learning of theories and concepts from NUR 182/152. The Roy Adaptation Nursing Model and management principles will be utilized to guide objectives to meet their personal learning needs with the approval of the instructor. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 182. Senior Standing.

NUR 190 Adaptation Nursing : Older Adult ( 1.5)

This one and a half unit gerontology course provides the senior level-nursing student with the principles of the Functional Consequences Theory as it relates to the Roy Adaptation Model. The student will apply both Models to the psychological and physiological functions of the older adult. Topics also include functional assessment, characteristics of today's older adults in the United States and issues regarding long-term care. Additionally, the student will carry out in-depth research in a gerontology-related subject. This research will be presented in a formal paper. Taken concurrently with NUR 191. Senior standing

NUR 191 Practicum: Older Adult (2.5)

This course provides each senior nursing student with the opportunity to practice gerontology nursing in an agency that services the older client. The Roy Adaptation Model and the Functional Consequences Theory are utilized to promote optimum health for the older client. The student will write a care plan with one modification for one older adult for which she/he is the caregiver. The student, depending upon the clinical agency, will practice either the role of the registered nurse case manager or the role of the registered nurse in a nurse run clinic. Conducting a teaching presentation for the older adult, the older adult's significant other/caregiver and/or the agency's staff will also be an integral part of the practicum. Taken for Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 190. Senior standing.

NUR 196H Senior Honors Thesis (3)

Open only to students admitted to the Honors Program.

NUR 198 Independent Studies (1-3)

Accelerated Bachelor of Science Major in Nursing

The Accelerated Bachelor of Science Degree - Major in Nursing (AccBSN) Program is the same curriculum design as the Bachelor of Science – Major in Nursing program (BSN), follows the stated philosophy, and students meet the terminal objectives as delineated for the BSN program. The AccBSN program offers the BSN program within a one year time frame and is a rigorous program of study. The Accelerated student completes a three semester course of study. At the completion of the final semester, graduates are eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and to qualify for the California Public Health Nursing Certificate. The AccBSN program is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

AccBSN Application Procedure

AccBSN applicants must submit the following documents:

  • Completed admissions application
  • Personal statement of intent
  • Official transcripts of all college work
  • Two recommendations by those acquainted with the applicant's ability to succeed in an accelerated curriculum.
  • Personal interviews may be scheduled.

AccBSN Program Admission Requirements

The AccBSN program is open to persons who have previously completed a Baccalaureate degree and who meet specific admission requirements. Admission to the program is open twice a year. Please see the website for specific deadlines.

To be considered for admission, students must be graduates of an accredited four-year college or university with an earned cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0.

An eligible applicant must have also completed the following requirements prior to beginning the program.

Transfer Articulation for the Accelerated Bachelor of Science – Major in Nursing

Mount Saint Mary's College accepts completed Baccalaureate degrees from accredited colleges and universities as evidence of fulfillment of MSMC General Studies requirements with the exception of philosophy and religious studies. To fulfill these requirements, students must complete two courses in each discipline.

Nursing Core Requirements

*Chemistry or Physics

(3-4 units)

*Human Anatomy with Lab

(3-4 units)

*Human Physiology with lab

(3-4 units)

*Microbiology with Lab

( 4 units)

Human Nutrition

( 3 units)

General Psychology

( 3 units)

Life-span Developmental Psychology (Infant through Older Adult )

( 3 units)

Introduction to Sociology or Cultural Anthropology

( 3 units)

Written and Oral Communication

(6 units)

*Must have been completed within five years prior to admission

General Studies Requirements

Philosophy

(3 units)

Philosophy

(3 upper division units, must be Bioethics)

Religious Studies Courses

(6 units)

AccBSN Entrance Requirements

Before admitted students begin the program in May, they must:

  • Complete the Department of Nursing Math Test with a minimum score of 84%.
  • Complete the necessary health forms and immunizations (See Health Policies, Department of Nursing.).
  • Be current in CPR (Healthcare Provider BCLS/Professional Rescuer CPR).
  • Carry malpractice insurance.
  • Complete a First Aid Course.
  • Submit a successful completion of Criminal Background as outlined in clinical policies

Costs/Financial Aid/Registration

Tuition for the AccBSN program is the same as the standard Mount St. Mary's College undergraduate tuition and fees for three semesters. There is a nursing fee for each of the three accelerated sessions. Please refer to the Fees and Expenses for exact figures and guidelines.

While AccBSN students are not eligible for Mount St. Mary's grants or scholarships, students may be eligible for federal, state, or private grants or loans. In order to qualify, students must send the FAFSA forms to the processor no later than January 15. Information on financial aid eligibility will be sent prior to the deposit deadline. A non-refundable deposit fee of $400.00 is due on the date specified in the acceptance letter.

AccBSN Degree Curriculum Requirements

The AccBSN program requires 124 units which includes 56 Nursing department units and 3 units of Bioethics. Admitted students must complete their total curriculum plan at Mount St. Mary's College. They may not take required nursing courses at other institutions. A sample program is listed below.

1st Semester

NUR 41

Adaptation Nursing Theory

(3)

NUR 42A

Fundamentals of Nursing: Theory

(2)

NUR 42B

Fundamentals of Nursing: Skills

(1)

NUR 44A

Introduction to Pathophysiology

(3)

NUR 44B

Adaptation Nursing: Adult Medical/Surgical Nursing

(3)

NUR 45AB

Practicum: Adult Medical/Surgical Nursing

(4,4)

Total units: 20

2nd Semester

NUR 135

Pharmacology in Nursing

(2)

NUR 140

Adaptation Nursing: Childbearing Family

(2.5)

NUR 141

Practicum: Childbearing Family

(1.5)

NUR 142

Adaptation Nursing: Children

(2.5)

NUR 143

Practicum: Children

(1.5)

NUR 144

Adaptation Nursing: Advanced Medical/Surgical

(2.5)

NUR 145

Practicum: Advanced Medical/Surgical Nursing

(1.5)

NUR 146

Adaptation Nursing: Mental Health

(2.5)

NUR 147

Practicum: Mental Health

(1.5)

Total units: 18

3rd Semester

NUR 134

Issues in Professional Nursing

(2)

NUR 136

Abuse: Child to Elder Adult

(1)

NUR 138

Nursing Research

(3)

NUR 150

Adaptation Nursing: Community Health

(1.5)

NUR 151

Practicum: Community Health Nursing

(1.5)

NUR 152

Adaptation Nursing: Leadership and Management

(1.5)

NUR 153

Practicum: Nursing Leadership and Management

(1.5)

NUR 156

Adaptation Nursing: Older Adult

(1.5)

NUR 157

Practicum: Older Adult

(1.5)

NUR 158

Adaptation Nursing: Senior Preceptorship

(1.5)

NUR 159

Practicum: Senior Preceptorship

(1.5)

Total units: 18

Total units for an Accelerated B.S. in Nursing: 124

Note: Prerequisites for courses in the NUR 140 and 160 Series: Successful completion of the NUR 41, 42AB, 44AB, 45AB or 51, 53ABC, 54, 60, 61, 65, and Nutrition. The NUR 140 and 160 courses involve the continued use of the Roy Adaptation Model as a basis for prevention, rehabilitation, and teaching.

Accelerated BSN Nursing Courses

NUR 41 Adaptation Nursing Theory (3)

Introduces the Roy Adaptation Model of Nursing with emphasis on the physiological and psychosocial modes as related to adult and older adult behaviors. Introduces concepts of cultural diversity, aging, and sexuality. 1st semester ABSN.

NUR 42A Fundamentals of Nursing: Theory (2)

Covers basic nursing measures necessary for safe patient care. The focus is to provide the theoretical foundation for selected nursing skills. 1st semester ABSN.

NUR 42B Fundamentals of Nursing: Skills (1)

Practice and development of the student's psychomotor ability in the performance of basic nursing skills taught in NUR 42A. Designed to integrate computer assisted learning for an independent approach to learning. Taken as Credit/No Credit. 1st semester ABSN.

NUR 44A Introduction to Pathophysiology (3)

Basic pathophysiological mechanisms of disease and selected medical-surgical disruptions of protection and oxygenation that are common to adults are presented for discussion. Patient care management is included.

Taken concurrently with NUR 45A. 1st semester ABSN.

NUR 44B Adaptation Nursing: Adult Medical/Surgical (3)

Common disruptions in the body's structure, function and regulatory mechanisms are presented which include immune response, inflammation, and temperature control. Nursing and Medical Management will be discussed. Taken concurrently with NUR 45B. 1st semester ABSN.

NUR 45A Practicum: Adult (4)

Clinical practice of nursing with application of concepts related to basic nursing knowledge, fundamentals, and skills. The focus is on the care of the adult hospitalized patient with common medical/surgical problems.

Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 44A. 1st semester ABSN.

NUR 45B Practicum: Adult (4)

Clinical practice of nursing process and skills with application of concepts related to basic nursing skills and to common disruptions in body systems. Focus on common medical-surgical problems affecting adults and older adults, stimuli for illness, nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, prevention, and teaching in an in-patient setting. Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 44B. 1st semester ABSN.

NUR 134 Issues in Professional Nursing (2)

The focus is on the profession of Nursing. Content includes the history of nursing, the Nursing Practice Act, legal aspects, liability, and other current issues affecting the nursing profession. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the NUR 160/140 series.

NUR 135 Pharmacology in Nursing (2)

Pharmacology as related to pathological processes and various groups of clients is presented, major drug classes and mechanisms of drug actions as well as nursing implications are detailed. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the NUR 40, 50, 60 series.

NUR 136 Abuse: Child to Elder Adult (1)

Child, elder and women's abuse will be covered. Included will be prevention, early detection, and intervention techniques. California reporting requirements for child abuse will be covered.

NUR 138 Research (3)

Principles of scientific methods, research designs appropriate to nursing, ethical conduct in human subject research, and components of theoretical frameworks are presented. Emphasis on understanding, critiquing, and applying published research findings to clinical practice. Prerequisite: Successful completion of NUR 160/140 series. 3rd semester ABSN. GS-II, VIIA (Satisfies one QL unit.)

NUR 140 Adaptation Nursing: Childbearing Family (2.5)

Lecture. The focus of the bio-psycho-social impact of health and illness problems related to childbearing families. Taken concurrently with NUR 141. 2nd semester ABSN.

NUR 141 Practicum: Childbearing Family (1.5)

Clinical practice in prenatal, delivery and postnatal care. Includes the study of parenting roles and health needs of emerging family groups. Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 140. 2nd semester ABSN.

NUR 142 Adaptation Nursing: Children (2.5)

Lecture. The focus of the bio-psycho-social impact of health and illness problems related to children. Taken concurrently with NUR 143. 2nd semester ABSN.

NUR 143 Practicum: Children (1.5)

Clinical practice in the health-illness problems encountered in the care of children, from infancy through adolescence, and their families. Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 142. 2nd semester ABSN.

NUR 144 Adaptation Nursing: Advanced Medical/Surgical (2.5)

Lecture. The focus of the bio-psycho-social impact of health and illness problems related to complex episodic medical and surgical disruptions in the adult. Patient care management is included. Taken concurrently with NUR 145. 2nd semester ABSN.

NUR 145 Practicum: Advanced Medical/Surgical Nursing 1.5)

Clinical practice in the health-illness problems encountered in the care of complex episodic medical and surgical disruptions in the adult. Patient care management is included

.

Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 144. 2nd semester ABSN.

NUR 146 Adaptation Nursing: Mental Health (2.5)

Lecture. The focus of the bio-psycho-social impact of health and illness problems related to the mental health of individuals and groups. Taken concurrently with NUR 147. 2nd semester ABSN.

NUR 147 Practicum: Mental Health (1.5)

Clinical practice in the application of the principles and concepts related to psycho-social problems in psychiatric settings. Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 146. 2nd semester ABSN.

NUR 150 Adaptation Nursing: Community Health (1.5)

Lecture. Theories and concepts from nursing and public health are presented from a bio-psycho-social perspective. The focus is on the health of the population, as well as on individuals, families and groups living in the community. The Roy Adaptation Model is threaded throughout the broad topics, which include community oriented practice, family, community assessment, epidemiology and communicable disease. Taken concurrently with NUR 151. 3rd semester ABSN.

NUR 151 Practicum: Community Health Nursing (1.5)

Provides a clinical experience for the senior level student to use the Roy Adaptation Model to improve the health of individuals, families, groups and the community as a whole. An epidemiological approach is utilized to identify and assess problems within aggregates in the community. A variety of populations and settings are used in order to provide the student with the opportunity to apply the theories and concepts from NUR 180/150. Taken concurrently with NUR 150. Taken as Credit/No Credit. 3rd semester ABSN.

NUR 152 Adaptation Nursing: Leadership and Management (1.5)

Lecture. Theory in this senior level course is designed to analyze leadership and management principles and illustrate how these concepts reflect professional nursing practice. The health care delivery environment will be discussed with an emphasis on the current and future trends in the management of nursing resources and personnel. The Roy Adaptation Model and systems theory is threaded through each topic and will be used to evaluate individuals, groups and organizations on how they work together. Taken concurrently with NUR 153. 3rd semester ABSN.

NUR 153 Practicum: Nursing Leadership and Management (1.5)

This clinical course provides the senior level student the opportunity to assess and practice under supervision the principles of leadership and management with a variety of populations in various settings. In addition, a conference will be utilized to simulate situations to enhance student's learning of theories and concepts from NUR 182/152. The Roy Adaptation Nursing Model and management principles will be utilized to guide assessment of a group identified in the clinical setting. Students may identify additional objectives to meet their personal learning needs with the approval of the instructor. Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 152. 3rd semester ABSN.

NUR 156 Adaptation Nursing: Older Adult ( 1.5)

Lecture. This gerontology course provides the student with the principles of the Functional Consequences Theory as it relates to the Roy Adaptation Model. The student will apply both models to the psychological and physiological functions of the older adult. Topics also include functional assessment, characteristics of today's older adults in the United States and issues regarding long-term care. Additionally, the student will carry out in-depth research in a gerontology related subject. This research will be presented in a formal paper

.

Taken concurrently with NUR 157. 3rd semester ABSN.

NUR 157 Practicum: Older Adult (1.5)

Clinical practice with older adult clients in various settings enabling the student to apply the concepts and principles in NUR 156. Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 156. 3rd semester ABSN.

NUR 158 Adaptation Nursing: Senior Preceptorship (1.5)

Lecture. Theory in this senior level course is applicable to any area of nursing specialty. Bio-psycho-social and spiritual approaches will be used to present concepts that the Baccalaureate prepared nurse can apply to promote adaptation in individuals, families, and groups. Broad topics include palliative care, communication, diversity, pain and symptom management, integrative therapies, and loss, grief and bereavement. Taken concurrently with NUR 159. 3rd semester ABSN.

NUR 159 Practicum: Senior Preceptorship (1.5)

The senior level student will continue to develop and practice the role of the Baccalaureate prepared nurse in this practicum. The student will have the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to apply the theory content from NUR 178/158 and the MSMC Nursing Baccalaureate Program Objectives. A variety of clinical agencies and nursing specialties will be used. The Roy Adaptation Model will be used as the foundation for professional nursing practice. Taken as Credit/No Credit. Taken concurrently with NUR 158. 3rd semester ABSN.