Online Associate Degrees through Portmont College

Online Associate degrees will be offered starting Spring of 2013 available through Portmont College at Mount St. Mary’s for Portmont students in an online format.

Degrees Offered

Associate of Arts with majors in:

Liberal Arts

Business Administration

Associate of Science with majors in:

Computer Science

Pre-Health Science

Students are governed by the catalog under which they enter Portmont College at Mount St. Mary’s. If subsequent catalogs have changes in major or general studies requirements, which are in the students’ favor, they may be substituted at the option of the student. Changes in College policies and procedures apply to all students.

Graduation with Honors (Associate in Arts and Science Degree)

Graduation with Honors shall be granted to a student who has earned the Associate in Arts degree and achieved a cumulative 3.5 grade point average at the end of term prior to the last term of attendance.

The student's grade point average will be calculated on the basis of grades earned at Portmont College at Mount St. Mary's, as well as college course credits and grades earned prior to the time of matriculation.

Courses completed at another institution after matriculation are not computed into the cumulative grade point average.

Students must meet the general education and major degree requirements of the catalog under which they matriculated. In addition to the degree requirements, students must follow the academic requirements, policies, and procedures in place in the current catalog. Such requirements include but are not limited to course prerequisites, minimum grades for transfer work, probation and dismissal requirements. For more information on policies and procedures refer to the Academic Information section of the catalog.

Online Associate in Arts and Science Degree Requirements

  1. Completion of at least 60 semester credits with a grade point average of 2.0 (a C average) for all college work undertaken at Portmont College at Mount St. Mary's.
  2. Completion of program requirements. (Listed under degree requirements.)
  3. A maximum of five credits of SPR and PED combined may be applied to requirements for the Associate degree.
  4. For the Associate degree, 24 semester credits must be completed during the last two semesters at Portmont College at Mount St. Mary's. Of these, a minimum of 12 semester credits must be in students’ major and earned in regular course work.
  5. The student must file a graduation application in the Registrar’s Office by the end of the term prior to the term of completion.

Required General Studies Courses:

Communication Skills (6 credits):

ENG 1A

Freshman English

(3)

ENG 1B

Freshman English

(3)

Arts and Sciences (9 credits):

At least one course must be taken from three of the following four categories for a minimum of 9 credits.

Art, Music, Literature:

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

MUS 6M

Varieties of Music

(3)

ENG 15

Literature & Society

(3)

History, Contemporary Economics, Politics:

HIS 1A

Western Civilization I

(3)

HIS 1B

Western Civilization II

(3)

ECO 2

Macroeconomics

(3)

Natural, Physical Sciences:

BIO 5

Life Sciences

(3)

BIO 50A, L

Human Anatomy & Lab

(4)

BIO 50B, L

Human Physiology & Lab

(4)

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

Social, Behavioral Sciences:

ECO 1

Microeconomics

(3)

PSY 1

General Psychology

(3)

SOC 1

Introduction to Sociology

(3)

Philosophy (3 credits):

PHI 10

Critical Thinking

(3)

PHI 21

Moral Values and Ethical Decisions

(3)

Religious Studies (3 credits):

RST 49

Biomedical Issues in Christian Ethics

(3)

RST 61

World Religions

(3)

Intro to College Studies (3 credits):

SPR 86A

Portmont College 101 – Ignition

(1)

SPR 86B

Portmont College 101 – Lift Off

(1)

SPR 86C

Portmont College 101 - Soar

(1)

Outreach (1 credit):

SPR 25

Scholar Mentor Seminar/Peer Tutoring

(1)

Diversity (3 credits):

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

MUS 6M

Varieties of Music

(3)

PHI 21

Moral Values and Ethical Decisions

(3)

RST 61

World Religions

(3)

Quantitative Literacy (3 credits):

MTH 10

Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematical Ideas

(3)

MTH 38

Elements of Probability and Statistics

(3)

*Specific general studies courses may be required by your major

Online Associate in Arts with a major in Liberal Arts

The Associate in Arts degree with a major in Liberal Arts is designed for the student who wishes to explore various disciplines. At the completion of the Associate in Arts program, the student may pursue a major leading to a Baccalaureate degree in a chosen field and/or may enter a career which utilizes the benefits from this interdisciplinary program.

Required courses:

ENG 1A

Freshman English

(3)

ENG 1B

Freshman English

(3)

SPE 10

Intro to Communication

(2)

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

OR

 

 

MUS 6M

Varieties of Music

 

ENG 15

Literature and Society

(3)

HIS 1A

Western Civilization I

(3)

HIS 1B

Western Civilization II

(3)

OR

 

 

ECO 2

Macroeconomics

 

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

PSY 1

General Psychology

(3)

SOC 1

Introduction to Sociology

(3)

SPR 86A Portmont College 101 – Ignition

(1)

SPR 86B Portmont College 101 – Lift Off

(1)

SPR 86C

Portmont College 101 - Soar

(1)

SPR 25

Scholar Mentor Seminar/Peer Tutoring

(1)

RST 61

World Religions

(3)

PHI 10

Critical Thinking

(3)

PHI 21

Moral Values and Ethical Decisions

(3)

MTH 10

Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematical Ideas

(3)

OR

 

 

MTH 38

Elements of Probability and Statistics

 

PED 1

Fitness for Freshmen

(1)

SPA 1

Elementary Spanish I

(4)

SPA 2

Elementary Spanish II

(4)

CIS 1

Computers Processes and Applications

(3)

Elective Course

 

(3)

Total Credits: 60

Online Associate in Arts with a major in Business Administration

The Associate in Arts degree in Business Administration is a two-year program that provides students with a strong business background invaluable in the modern work environment. In addition, the Business Administration Program prepares students with the foundation necessary to successfully transfer to a four year business program. The courses in the A. A. Business Administration Program focus on business fundamentals commensurate with lower division instruction while also stressing the communication and critical thinking skills necessary to succeed and advance in a business career. General studies courses contribute to the broad based education of students which not only makes them more attractive to employers, but exposes them to the spectrum of knowledge and ideas that are the mark of a liberal arts education.

Required Courses:

ENG 1A

Freshman English

(3)

ENG 1B

Freshman English

(3)

BUS 5

Business Law 1

(3)

ECO 2

Macroeconomics

(3)

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

ECO 1

Microeconomics

(3)

PHI 10

Critical Thinking

(3)

PHI 92

Business Ethics

(3)

RST 61

World Religions

(3)

SPR 86A Portmont College 101 – Ignition

(1)

SPR 86B Portmont College 101 – Lift Off

(1)

SPR 86C Portmont College 101 - Soar

(1)

SPR 25

Scholar Mentor Seminar/Peer Tutoring

(1)

BUS 16A

Accounting Principles 1

(4)

BUS 16B

Accounting Principles 2

(4)

MTH 28

Mathematical Analysis for Business

(3)

OR

 

 

MTH 38

Elements of Probability and Statistics

 

BUS 4

Business Foundation and Analysis

(3)

BUS 21

Business Writing

(3)

BUS 185

Principles of Management

(3)

BUS 160

Principles of Marketing

(3)

BUS 175

Sales Management

(3)

BUS 184

Organizational Behavior

(3)

Total Credits: 60

Online Associate in Science with a major in Computer Science

The Associate in Science degree with an emphasis in Computer Science is designed to prepare a student to either transfer to a 4-year program in Computer Science or to enter the workforce with marketable skills to work in the information technology field. Students will develop skills in computer programming, algorithms, data structures, and software engineering.

Required Courses:

ENG 1A

Freshman English

(3)

ENG 1B

Freshman English

(3)

ECO 2

Macroeconomics

(3)

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

ECO 1

Microeconomics

(3)

PHI 21

Moral Values and Ethical Decisions

(3)

RST 61

World Religions

(3)

SPR 86A

Portmont College 101 – Ignition

(1)

SPR 86B

Portmont College 101 – Lift Off

(1)

SPR 86C

Portmont College 101 – Soar

(1)

SPR 25

Scholar Mentor Seminar/ Peer Tutoring

(1)

MTH 5A

Calculus 1

(4)

MTH 5B

Calculus 2

(4)

MTH 38

Elements of Probability and Statistics

(3)

CIS 5

Introduction to Computer Science and Programming I

(3)

CIS 10

Introduction to Computer Science and Programming II

(3)

MTH 135

Structure and Comparison of Programming Languages

(3)

CIS 15A

Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms

(3)

CIS 15B

Algorithm Design and Analysis

(3)

CIS 50A

Software Engineering 1

(3)

CIS 50B

Software Engineering 2

(3)

MTH 5C

Calculus 3

(4)

OR

 

 

CIS 60

Object-oriented programming

(3)

OR

 

 

CIS 65

Applied Databases

(3)

OR

 

 

CIS 70

Web Engineering

(3)

OR

 

 

CIS 75

Data Mining and Predictive Modeling

(3)

Total Credits: 60

Online Associate in Science with a major in Pre-Health Science

The online Pre-Health Science Program is designed for students who wish to pursue studies which prepare them for a healthcare related profession. The Pre-Health Science Program provides the student with the opportunity to take general studies requirements and preparatory courses for programs in Nursing, Pre-Physical Therapy, Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Pre-Veterinarian, Pre-Pharmacy or other healthcare related programs. The program is designed to provide the student the opportunity to consider career alternatives. Students completing the Pre-Health Science Program requirements will receive an Associate in Science degree.

Required Courses:

ENG 1A

Freshman English

(3)

ENG 1B

Freshman English

(3)

SPE 10

Introduction to Communication

(2)

ART 5

Fundamentals of Art

(3)

OR

 

 

MUS 6M

Varieties of Music

(3)

BIO 5

Life Sciences

(3)

BIO 50A,L

Human Anatomy & Lab

(4)

BIO 50B,L

Human Anatomy & Lab

(4)

BIO 3,L

General Microbiology & Lab

(4)

PHS 1

Scientific Concepts

(3)

CHE 1A,L

General Chemistry & Lab

(4)

PSY 1

General Psychology

(3)

SOC 1

Introduction to Sociology

(3)

PHI 21

Moral Values and Ethical Decisions

(3)

RST 49

Biomedical Issues in Ethics

(3)

SPR 86A Portmont College 101 – Ignition

(1)

SPR 86B Portmont College 101 – Lift Off

(1)

SPR 86C Portmont College 101 – Soar

(1)

SPR 25

Scholar Mentor Seminar/Peer Tutoring

(1)

MTH 1

College Algebra and Trigonometry

(4)

SPR 70

Careers in Health

(1)

PSY 12

Developmental Psychology/Lifespan

(3)

BIO 112

Human Nutrition

(3)

Total Credits: 60

Course Descriptions

ART 5 Fundamentals of Art (3)

Illustrated lecture through the use of slides and videos on the development of art forms from around the world. History from earliest time periods through contemporary life. Various modes of painting, sculpture, architecture, and crafts will be studied. A few of the classes will be devoted to a hands-on exploration of some of these art forms.

BIO 3,L General Microbiology and Lab (4)

This is an introductory microbiology course that will cover the basic principles of microbial growth and metabolism, cellular morphology and structure, taxonomy, pathogenicity, immunity, and control. Course will focus on microorganisms as agents of disease and normal inhabitants of our environment.

The laboratory complements BIO

(3) lecture and will include techniques of isolation, cultivation and identification of bacteria. Laboratory 3 hrs. Graded. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in BIO 3 or completion of BIO 3 with a grade of C or better.

BIO 5 Life Sciences (3)

This course is an introduction to the biological sciences for non-major students or as a preparation for major students with emphases on cell biology and biodiversity. Topics include cell structure and function, metabolism and energy flow, cell division, inheritance and genetics, natural selection, and structure and functions of different living forms. The laboratory will illuminate these topics and provide opportunities for hands-on experiences. Lecture 2 hrs. Laboratory 2 hrs.

BIO 50A, L Human Anatomy and Lab (4)

The Laboratory complements BIO 50A lecture. Laboratory exercises are used to expand and clarify the concepts presented in lecture. These include microscopic reviews, dissections and other multiple teaching/learning media. Laboratory 3 hrs. Graded. Prerequisites: successful completion of a high school General Biology course and concurrent enrollment in BIO 50A lecture or completion of BIO 50A with a grade of C or better.

BIO 50B, L Human Anatomy and Lab (4)

The laboratory complements BIO 50B lecture. Laboratory exercises include measurements of physiological activities from the molecular level to the whole organism. Laboratory 3 hrs. Graded. Prerequisites: a grade of C or above in BIO 50A lecture and laboratory and concurrent enrollment in BIO 50B lecture or completion of BIO 50B with a grade of C or better.

BIO 112 Human Nutrition (3)

A study of different nutrients with emphasis on nutritional requirements for health and prevention of chronic diseases which are major causes of death in the United States today. Topics include healthy lifestyle including daily meal planning, weight control and exercise, harmful effects of alcohol and drugs. Special needs during pregnancy and lactation, infancy and childhood, adulthood, and old age will also be considered. Lecture 3 hrs.

BUS 4 Business Foundations & Analysis (3)

An analytical survey of the principles and skills necessary for accounting, economics, marketing, finance, human resources, management, and government policies as they apply to business in the United States and globally. Through the course students develop a framework for analyzing business issues and develop critical thinking skills to solve organizational problems. This course will include an introduction of the case method.

BUS 5 Business Law 1 (3)

An introduction to the development of legal principles for business activity, as found in common law, statutory laws, and the Uniform Commercial Code. Use of case studies for practical applications. Introduction to legal reasoning and legal writing; concentration on contracts and their use throughout all business negotiations; introduction to issues of commercial liability and sales transactions.

BUS 16A Accounting Principles 1 (4)

Course emphasis is on the measurement, valuation, and the accumulation of accounting data. Topics include the accounting cycle through financial statements, accounting for merchandise, internal control, notes, bad debts, inventories and accounting for lived tangible and intangible assets. Focus is on the sole proprietorship. Faculty-guided lab experiences are provided for additional reinforcement of course concepts.

BUS 16B Accounting Principles 2 (4)

Course emphasis is on the measurement, valuation and the accumulation of accounting data. Topics include accounting for partnerships, corporations, bonds, cash flow statements, present value, annuities and financial statement analysis. Faculty guided experiences are provided for additional reinforcement of course concepts. Prerequisite: BUS 16A.

BUS 21 Business Writing (3)

This course develops the writing and communications skills needed for success in business with an emphasis on basic mechanics, formatting, and persuasive techniques. The course focuses on practical experience writing business reports, letters, memoranda, executive summaries, proposals, and presentations as well as reading comprehension, the cornerstone of clear writing.

BUS 184 Organizational Behavior (3)

This course brings the insights into human behavior in organizations brought forth by psychology and sociology and centers them on their implications for business organizations. Issues pursued in this course include group dynamics, communications, motivation, leadership, and decision making as well as organizational design, culture, development and change. The discipline of organizational behavior is unique in its combined goals of seeking organizational success while advocating employee empowerment.

BUS 185 Principles of Management (3)

This course discusses the four principal functions of management: planning, organization, leadership and control, including quality control, managing cultural diversity, motivation and other leadership issues, decision making, group communication and organization. Case studies explore these topics within the context of business ethics and corporate responsibility to the community. Prerequisite: BUS 4

BUS 160 Principles of Marketing (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of marketing. Through this course, (a) the foundations of marketing will be explored--product issues, pricing decisions, distribution channels and promotional strategies; (b) the users of marketing will be identified; (c) the role of marketing in the organization and society will be examined; (d) marketing objectives, tools and resources will be assessed; and (e) components of strong marketing strategy will be evaluated. Prerequisite: BUS 4.

BUS 175 Sales Management (3)

This course explores the function of sales and the relationship to the overall marketing program. Topics considered include setting sales objectives, formulation of sales strategy, development of a sales organization, selecting and working with distributors and dealers, measurement of salesmen's performance, evaluation of sales management performance, control of sales operations, and integration of sales and other marketing activities. Prerequisite: BUS 160.

CHE 1A, L General Chemistry and Lab (4)

Atomic theory, atomic structure and the periodic table; molecular structure and bonding; structure and properties of solids, liquids, and gases; kinetic theory and colligative properties. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: High school chemistry, three years of high school mathematics or grade of C or better in CHE 3 or PHS 1. The laboratory will complements the lecture and will include Quantitative techniques including gravimetric and volumetric analyses; qualitative techniques including isolation of compounds and descriptive chemistry of inorganic compounds. Laboratory 4 hrs. per week. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 1A (recommended) or completion of CHE 1A with a grade of C or better.

CIS 1 Computer Processes and Applications (3)

Description of the computer and its logical structure and functioning including hardware (processors, storage, and communications), networking, and levels of software. Introduction to BASIC programming languages and binary systems. Use of application programs for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, Internet, and e-mail.

CIS 5 Intro to Computer Science and Programming I (3)

The course focuses on computer science foundations, problem solving, basic data types, basic algorithms, and programming methodology. This class does not assume any prior programming experience. The goal of the course is to teach the student to program a computer (write code), to read code written by others, and to take a problem description and translate it into a computational problem (think algorithmically).

CIS 10 Intro to Computer Science and Programming II (3)

Continued focus on computer science foundations and architecture, problem solving, abstract data types, algorithms, programming methodologies and web technologies. The goal of this course is to apply computer science principles to relevant problem sets. Prerequisite CIS 5.

CIS 15A Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms (3)

Fundamentals of data structures and algorithms, including lists, queues, trees, graphs, hash tables, sorting, searching, and hashing.

CIS 15B Algorithm Design and Analysis (3)

Designing, writing and analyzing algorithms using various data structures. Asymptotic analysis of performance and analysis of space characteristics. Including algorithm design techniques. Prerequisite CIS 15A.

CIS 50A Software Engineering 1 (3)

Overview of software development methodologies as well as software development phases and activities. Description of techniques to improve software quality including: analyzing requirements, effective designs, unit test, static analysis and code inspections. Overview of development planning, risk analysis techniques, and effective use of metrics for reporting. 

CIS 50B Software Engineering 2 (3)

Focuses on the process of designing, developing, and maintaining real world software applications. Students will work in teams on developing a complex software system over the course of the semester.

CIS 60 Object-oriented programming (3)

Study of object-oriented design and programming to solve problems. Topics include classes, inheritance, polymorphism, design notations, development environments, and a survey of languages.

CIS 65 Applied Databases (3)

Examination of file organizations and file access methods. Studies various data models including relational, hierarchical, network, and object-oriented. Emphasis given to the relational data model. SQL, the data definition and manipulation language for relational databases, is described.

CIS 70 Web engineering (3)

Organization of and access to information on the Internet. Design, creation and publication of interactive web pages with HTML, multimedia, animated custom graphics, applets and JavaScript programming. Ethical issues, including security and privacy on the World Wide Web.

CIS 75 Data Mining and Predictive Modeling (3)

Techniques for discovering hidden patterns in data generated by businesses, science, web, and other sources. Focus is on the key tasks of data mining, including data preparation, classification, clustering, association rule mining, and evaluation.

ECO 1 Microeconomics (3)

An exploration of the economic affairs of industries and the individual business firm. This course introduces the price system, the law of supply and demand and economic analysis of individual markets such as labor or international trade.

ECO 2 Macroeconomics (3)

An introductory analysis of the aggregate economic system. This course discusses methods of recording and determining gross national product, employment, price stability, fiscal and monetary policy.

ENG 1A Freshman English (3)

Principles and practice of writing with attention to analytical reading. Includes discussion skills, library usage, research techniques, and an introduction to literature.

ENG 1B Freshman English (3)

Principles and practice of writing with attention to analytical reading. Includes discussion skills, library usage, research techniques, and an introduction to literature.

ENG 15 Literature and Society (3)

Examination of society's accomplishments and vexations in selected literary works that portray human striving in family, nation, and technological world. Pre-requisite: Need to successfully complete ENG 1A and ENG 1B with a grade of "C’ or better.

HIS 1A Western Civilization I (3)

An historical study of the major elements in human heritage designed to introduce the student to the ideas, attitudes, and institutions basic to western civilization.

HIS 1B Western Civilization II (3)

An historical study of the major elements in human heritage designed to introduce the student to the ideas, attitudes, and institutions basic to western civilization. Must successfully pass His 001A with a grade of "C" or better.

MTH 1 College Algebra and Trigonometry (4)

Set language and notation, real and complex numbers, fundamental operations, inequalities; polynomial, exponential, and trigonometric functions, and their graphs; De Moivre's theorem.

MTH 5A Calculus 1 (4)

Limits; continuity; derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications; antiderivatives; an introduction to the definite integral; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: Three to four years of high school mathematics including trigonometry.

MTH 5B Calculus 2 (4)

Techniques of integration (including substitution and parts); numerical methods of integration; applications of the integral (including areas, and volumes); improper integrals; differential equations an introduction to parametric equations and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: Grade of C - or better in MTH 5A.

MTH 5C Calculus 3 (4)

Partial derivatives; multiple integrals; three-dimensional space; vectors in two- and three-dimensional space; vector calculus. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MTH 5B or consent of instructor.

MTH 10 Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematical Ideas (3)

Ideas in mathematics chosen to emphasize problem-solving, decision-making, economic productivity and real-world applications. Topics include critical thinking, inductive reasoning, problem solving, numbers, finances, statistics, probability, geometry, algebra and exponential functions.

MTH 28 Mathematical Analysis for Business (3)

Topics in Algebra including solutions of systems of equations and inequalities; exponential and logarithmic functions; linear programming and mathematics of finance. Emphasis is placed on the application of mathematics to problems in business.

MTH 38 Elements of Probability and Statistics (3)

Elementary probability theory, properties of distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation

MTH 135 Structure & Comparison of Programming Languages (3)

Basic concepts of syntax and semantics. Comparison of syntax and semantics of selected programming languages, language design. How to evaluate a computer programming language. Prerequisites: MTH 5A, CIS 10, or consent of instructor.

MUS 6M Varieties of Music (3)

Beginning with an introduction to the world and language of music, this course explores the richness of the art of sound from varieties of avenues in order to heighten awareness, understanding and appreciation of this art. Emphasis on the diversity and stylistic development of music as it reflects the times and world cultures.

PED 1 Fitness for Freshmen (1)

Fight off the Freshmen Fifteen with this interactive class that is designed to address the specific physical activity and nutrition needs of freshmen as they transition to life in college. Students will participate in aerobic and resistance training activities as well as meal planning and nutrition logs. Students will learn to make lifestyle changes that will enhance their mental and physical health with the support of classmates and instructors.

PHI 10 Critical Thinking (3)

Students taking this course will learn reasoning techniques so they develop their skills at argumentation, spotting fallacious reasoning, examining uses of language, evaluating reasoning, examining assumptions, weighing evidence, determining credibility of witnesses, problem solving, decision-making, and applying critical thinking skills to moral reasoning, advertising, the media, and legal reasoning.

PHI 21 Moral Values and Ethical Decisions (3)

This course is an introduction to moral reasoning and ethical decision-making, with a focus on fundamental ethical theories. Using the different theories, we examine some major moral dilemmas we face (such as the death penalty, world hunger, environmental ethics, abortion, sexual morality, censorship).

PHI 92 Business Ethics (3)

A case study approach to business ethics and information technology. Using ethical theories, we will cover such moral dilemmas as affirmative action, electronic privacy, censorship and the Internet, and business practices (product liability, whistle blowing, honesty, advertising) environmental concerns, global issues, corporate decision-making and responsibility.

PHS 1 Scientific Concepts (3)

This introductory course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge of the scientific principles that govern our environment. The primary emphasis is chemistry, including an overview of the properties of chemicals with a closer look at the atom, the elements, and chemical bonds and reactions. Also addressed are topics in Physics such as mechanics, heat and energy. This course will provide students with the foundation needed for continued study in the sciences and applied fields such as nursing.

PSY 1 General Psychology (3)

This course is an introduction to the study of mental processes and behavior. The course will survey major concepts, research findings, and practical applications of current research. The course focuses on questions such as: How do people change and grow from infancy to adulthood? How do we learn and remember best? How does biology influence behavior? How do our senses help us to interpret the world? How does personality work? How do other people affect our behavior? What does it mean to be "abnormal"?

PSY 12 Developmental Psychology/ Lifespan (3)

Introduction to human development from conception to death. Covers major theories of psychological growth, interactions between heredity and environment, and the physical, cognitive, and social domains of development in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Focuses on concepts and issues important in prenatal development, thinking and social relationships in childhood and adolescence, effective parenting, and personal growth through the lifespan. Prerequisite: PSY 1.

RST 49 Biomedical Issues in Ethics (3)

A study of issues and questions concerning the phenomenon of human life, the process of dying, and current developments in medicine and technology. Topics include reproductive technologies, genetic engineering, euthanasia, healthcare reform and clinical ethics.

RST 61 World Religions (3)

A survey of the largest religious traditions: includes Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Other religions may be added (e.g., Confucian/Taoism at the discretion of professor). This course focuses on the following: the religion’s historical development, its sacred texts, essentials in its way of life, its spiritual life and arts, and distinctive truths about ultimate realities and the unique purpose of human life and afterlife hopes.

SOC 1 Intro to Sociology (3)

An introduction to the scientific study of human social behavior, including the foundational theories and the basic elements of social research. Viewing human life as inherently social, the social and environmental forces which influence and are influenced by personal experience, culture, and social arrangements, are examined. A human rights course.

SPA 1 Elementary Spanish I (4)

Develops the four fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis on speaking and grammar.

SPA 2 Elementary Spanish II (4)

Further develops the fundamental skills stressing reading and writing as well as vocabulary building. Prerequisite: SPA 1 or equivalent.

SPE 10 Intro to Communication (2)

Introduction to basic principles of communication theory in both small and large groups together with practice in discussion and speech delivery.

SPR 25 Scholar Mentor Seminar / Peer Tutoring (1)

A survey of the issues and skills needed for successful peer tutoring. Emphasis is placed on understanding of tutoring principles and practices important for initiating a productive tutorial relationship. Permission of instructor is required.

SPR 70 Careers in Health (1)

A course designed to explore selected careers in health. Gives the student an opportunity to develop career goals related to individual interest and skills. Includes an introduction to medical terminology.

SPR 86ABC Portmont College 101 (1,1,1)

This course is designed to assist new students in successfully transitioning into Portmont’s rigorous online and blended learning format. College Success specialists conduct this in-person intensive session. Course topics may include time-management, effective utilization of college technology, self-care and stress management, academic planning, career planning and introduction to college resources.