Master of Science in Education & Teacher Credential Programs
Mount Saint Mary's College
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Course Descriptions

EDU 200 Research Methods (3)
This course is an introduction to research methods with an emphasis on methods of reflective, practitioner-directed inquiry. The course includes a focus on action research aimed at improvement of professional practice in leadership and teaching. The course also surveys quantitative methods and logic in the social sciences to prepare professionals to access and critically consume traditional research findings to support and extend their own inquiries. The political implications of traditional and practitioner driven research models are discussed. The course culminates in two capstone projects: 1) a research-supported explication of the student's personal pedagogy of practice, and 2) an action-research design project.

EDU 200A Research Methods for Practitioners (2)
This course includes a study of the various approaches to educational research including historical, qualitative, and quantitative. It is intended to develop facility in reading research articles and applying knowledge gained through research to one's own teaching practice and to issues of importance in education. The goals of this course are to enable participants to: a) become an active participant in the community of professional educators, b) read and understand educational research and c) apply findings from educational research to their classroom/school administrator practice.

EDU 200C Research Methods (3)
This course is an introduction to research methods with an emphasis on methods of reflective, practitioner-directed inquiry. The course includes a focus on action research aimed at improvement of professional practice in leadership and teaching. The course also surveys quantitative methods and logic in the social sciences to prepare professionals to access and critically consume traditional research findings to support and extend their own inquiries. The political implications of traditional and practitioner driven research models are discussed. The course culminates in two capstone projects: 1) a research-supported explication of the student's personal pedagogy of practice, and 2) an action-research design project.

EDU 205 Technologies for Educators (2)
This course is an advanced seminar in which teachers study the pedagogical implications of technology in education and gain practical experience in integrating technology into classroom instruction. In addition to applying common software (such as word processing, spreadsheets, database, and multi-media) to achieve educational objectives, students will be engaged in projects utilizing current technology, such as collaborative dialogue tools (email, discussion groups), internet research, electronic portfolios, and distance learning. Course assignments require application of principles in the teacher's current teaching context.

EDU 206 School and Society (2)
The course explores major concepts and principles regarding the historical and contemporary purposes, roles and functions of formal education in American society. The course examines two primary areas: (1) the social and cultural conditions of K-12 schooling, especially as it relates to persistent inequalities in schools and the role of teachers in the creation of equitable classrooms and (2) approaches to curriculum and the use of state adopted textbooks within content areas, their relationship with state standards, and the role of teachers in the adoption and use of textbooks in promoting a just and democratic society. (Often cross-listed with EDU 106)

EDU 207 Teaching English Learners (1.5)
This course is designed to provide general education and education specialists with a foundational background in applied linguistics as it relates to K-12 instruction with applications for reading instruction and language development for students with limited English proficiency and students with language learning disabilities. Topics to be covered include the structure of English, linguistic variation, language development in first- and second-language learners, disorders of language development, and implications for creating classroom environments that promote language development. (Often cross-listed with EDU 107)

EDU 208A Intro to Exceptional Learners (1.5)
In this introduction to the assessment and instruction of students who require a broader learning experience for success, candidates will become knowledgeable about available strategies and resources designed to assist the struggling student in demonstrating their ability to learn. Candidates will gain knowledge about the federal and state legal requirements for the students with special needs. Candidates will learn to use assessments, design curriculum and respond effectively by demonstrating differentiated teaching methods of intervention relative to the core academic curriculum. (Often cross-listed with EDU 108A)

EDU 208B Responsive Teaching for All Learners (1.5)
Candidates will learn to implement appropriate assessment and instructional methods for students who require a broader learning experience for success. Candidates will become knowledgeable about available strategies and resources designed to assist the struggling student in demonstrating their ability to learn. Candidates will gain knowledge about the federal and state legal requirements for the students with special needs. Candidates will learn to use assessments, design curriculum and respond effectively by demonstrating differentiated teaching methods of intervention relative to the core academic curriculum. (Often cross-listed with EDU 108B)

EDU 209A TPA Lab I (1.5)
This lab provides an opportunity for candidates to apply best practices to planning for instruction and assessment of student learning. To better prepare new teachers, the credential programs have embedded a teaching performance assessment. The assessment is designed to give candidates the opportunity to develop, refine, and demonstrate their teaching knowledge, skills, and abilities. The lab will provide an overview of the California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA) and support candidates through the completion and submission of the Subject-Specific Pedagogy (SSP) task. The CalTPA is aligned with the state-adopted content standards for students, as well as with state content frameworks, and the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). (Often cross-listed with EDU 109A) Prerequisite: EDU 250 or EDU 266.

EDU 209B TPA Lab II (1.5)
This lab provides an opportunity for candidates to apply best practices to planning for instruction and differentiating the learning experiences to meet the needs of English learners and students with special needs. To better prepare new teachers, the credential programs have embedded a teaching performance assessment. The assessment is designed to give candidates the opportunity to develop, refine, and demonstrate their teaching knowledge, skills, and abilities. The lab will support candidates through the completion and submission of the CalTPA Designing Instruction (DI) task. (Often cross-listed with EDU 109B) Prerequisite: EDU 209A.

EDU 210 Supervised Teaching Culminating Seminar (3)
This course is the final seminar in the Elementary, Secondary, and Education Specialist Teacher Preparation Programs. Taken concurrently with the supervised teaching fieldwork, if required, it provides candidates with a culminating weekly forum for discussion, reflection, and goal setting toward developing professionalism as a teacher. Topics that address assessment, curriculum differentiation, the IEP process, effective use of technology, dealing with suspected child abuse, and continued development of professional ethics are geared toward creating a more supported academic learning environment, higher academic achievement, and to assist candidates with classroom management. Course activities will extend candidates' understanding of key concepts and principles in the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and allow candidates to demonstrate competence on the Teaching Performance Assessment. Elementary, secondary and special education students enroll in separate sections of EDU 210. Beginning Spring 2014, candidates will take EDU 210 (3 units) to satisfy requirements met in this course. (Often cross-listed with EDU 110)

EDU 210i Supervised Teaching Culminating Seminar (variable units, 3 units total over program)
This course section for interns, is the final seminar in the Elementary, Secondary, and Education Specialist Teacher Preparation Programs. Taken concurrently with the supervised teaching fieldwork, if required, it provides candidates with a culminating weekly forum for discussion, reflection, and goal setting toward developing professionalism as a teacher. Topics that address assessment, curriculum differentiation, the IEP process, effective use of technology, dealing with suspected child abuse, and continued development of professional ethics are geared toward creating a more supported academic learning environment, higher academic achievement, and to assist candidates with classroom management. Course activities will extend candidates' understanding of key concepts and principles in the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and allow candidates to demonstrate competence on the Teaching Performance Assessment. Elementary, secondary and special education students enroll in separate sections of EDU 210i. Interns enroll in the seminar for a variable number of units during each semester of their program, equivalent to 3 units total overall. Beginning Spring 2014, candidates will take EDU 210i (3 units) to satisfy requirements met in this course. (Often cross-listed with EDU 110 and 210)

EDU 212 Physical Education: Elementary Curriculum (1)
This course is designed to introduce elementary teacher preparation candidates to the California Physical Education Framework and specific teaching strategies for the development of students' motor skills, a healthy lifestyle, student knowledge of rules and strategies of games and sports, and student self-confidence and self-worth in relation to physical education and recreation.

EDU 213A Health-Related Issues in Education (1)
The course addresses major laws, concepts and principles related to creating a supportive, healthy environment for K-12 student learning. Credential candidates will study the effects of student health and safety on learning, teachers' legal responsibilities, and how to access school and community resources to meet individual student needs. They will practice means for working constructively with students, families, and community members on health and safety issues.

EDU 213B Healthy Environments for Student Learning (2)
This advanced course addresses major concepts and principles related to creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. This advanced course addresses major concepts and principles related to creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. Teachers will investigate strategies for building a classroom climate of trust and respect where students can develop positive social skills. They will practice means for working constructively with students, families, and community members to create safe school environments that respect the rights of all students. Course assignments require application of principles in the teacher's current teaching context.

EDU 225A Assessment in Teacher Development (1 unit)
This professional clear course teaches candidates about the use of self-assessment to analyze their competencies, set professional goals, and create a development plan for growth as an educator. Teachers will conduct an investigation regarding their personal context for teaching, including information on student demographics and campus resources.

EDU 225B Professional Investigation (1 unit, hybrid online)
This professional clear course assists candidates in conducting an inquiry project on a topic of their choice in order to advance their development as a teacher. Within this inquiry project, teachers will be required to describe and evaluate how they are addressing the needs of three focus students (an English Learner, a student with special needs, and a third student of their choice). (Additional Clear Portfolio Mid-Program Evaluation fee of $50)

EDU 225C Professional Investigation ll(1 unit)
This professional clear course assists candidates in conducting an inquiry project on a topic of their choice in order to advance their development as a teacher. Within this inquiry project, teachers will be required to describe and evaluate how they are addressing the needs of three focus students (an English Learner, a student with special needs, and a third student of their choice). Hybrid online.

EDU 225D Portfolio Development and Analysis(1 unit)
This professional clear course teaches candidates about the use of professional development portfolios to evaluate the accomplishment of personal goals. Teachers will investigate the use of portfolios as evaluative tools and produce a culminating portfolio of their growth as professional educators. (Additional Clear Portfolio Final Evaluation fee of $100). Hybrid online.

EDU 233 DHH: Multiple Perspectives(3 units)
This course provides an introduction to the education of children and youth with a hearing loss, ages birth to 22. It is designed to promote an understanding of the multiple perspectives in deaf education. Topic areas include the history of deaf education, current research, issues, and trends (e.g., Universal Design for Learning Principles, Positive Behavioral Support, English Language Learners, Autism Spectrum Disorders, etc.), legal foundations (IDEA, ADA, etc.), professional resources and their application to today's child with a hearing loss.

EDU 234A DHH: Auditory-Verbal Foundations(2 units)
This course provides a foundation in the research basis for the auditory-verbal approach to working with children with hearing loss, beginning with the theory of the acoustic basis of speech perception. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the major anatomical structures responsible for speech production, determine what speech sounds are accessible by evaluating an audiogram using knowledge of speech acoustics, categorize phonemes, and transcribe speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

EDU 234B DHH: Auditory-Verbal Principles(3 units)
This course provides an introduction to theory and methods in developing and remediating speech and auditory skills in individuals with hearing loss, from birth to age 22. The student will be able to assess and teach speech production and speech perception, through knowledge of the acoustic basis for speech. Daniel Ling's auditory-verbal methods of teaching speech and audition form the basis for the theoretical concepts and practical strategies to develop listening and spoken language used in the course.

EDU 234C DHH: Auditory-Verbal Practicum(3 units)
This is an advanced course in auditory-verbal therapy, building on the theory and practice from the prerequisite courses, EDU 235A DHH: Auditory-Verbal Foundations, and EDU 235B DHH: Auditory-Verbal Principles. The goal of the course is to allow students to practice an auditory-verbal diagnostic teaching model with two or more children and their families over a course of several sessions. Students administer assessments in phonetic and phonologic speech, receptive and expressive language, and auditory skills to children with hearing loss. From the assessments, students choose targets in each area, write lesson plans, choose appropriate materials and integrate goals in each area into a content-based theme, using literature as a core. Parent skills are also assessed to plan for parent participation, guidance and education in the lab, using adult learning theory principles and parent coaching models learned in previous courses.

EDU 235A DHH: Early Intervention Theory (3 unit)
This course provides theory and practical application in early intervention for teachers of children with hearing loss, birth to three years old. Topics include theories of adult learning principles, parent coaching, family-centered early intervention strategies, typical and atypical infant-toddler development, a variety of appropriate assessments, strategies for guiding parents in natural settings, as well as center-based programs, coordination of services for children with additional challenges, including English Language learners and children with autism spectrum disorders, an understanding of participating in interdisciplinary teams, the ability to foster interagency collaborations, and skills to help families from diverse backgrounds. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the impact of a diagnosis of a very young child on the entire family. Students will demonstrate knowledgeable of current theory, practices and legal requirements (IDEA, IFSP, transition planning, etc.) to support families with infants and toddlers with hearing loss. This course also prepares students to participate in practicum activities in future coursework through observation in fieldwork hours.

EDU 235B DHH: Early Intervention Practicum (3 unit)
This course serves as the practicum component to EDU 235A DHH: Early Intervention Theory, which is a prerequisite to this course. Continuing with the theoretical discussions and observations of EDU 235A DHH: Early Intervention Theory, students gain hands-on experience assessing and teaching in both center-based and one-to-one settings with parents and infants and toddlers from diverse backgrounds, including English Language Learners. Students integrate, plan, and apply their learning from a variety of courses into direct, guided interactions with parents and their infants and toddlers. Children with multiple challenges, with different levels of hearing loss, children who are English Language Learners, and children who are using a variety of communication modes are included in the caseload of families who participate in this experience. Opportunities to work alongside and collaborate with experienced parent-infant teachers of the deaf, audiologists, psychologists, occupational and physical therapists, and child development specialists are provided. Students meet regularly as a group and individually with the instructor for follow-up and evaluation of their videotaped sessions.

EDU 235C DHH: Supporting Families (3 unit)
Based on the theories and practice of psychologists Ken Moses and David Luterman, this course is designed to increase educators' knowledge about how to work with families who have a child with special needs, with emphasis on families who have a child with a hearing loss. Educators will demonstrate their knowledge and skills in supporting the grieving process through using specific counseling techniques. This course will include readings, class discussions, lectures, demonstrations, role plays, an ethnographic case study of a selected family; observation in parent support groups; parent guest speakers; parent mentors; students' written reflections about families' experiences; an understanding of the role of the teacher in perceiving and understanding these issues, working collaboratively with families and issues relating to diversity.

EDU 236A DHH: Audiology - Diagnostics (3 unit)
This course will focus on development of an understanding of audiology as it relates to the child with a hearing loss. An introduction of anatomy and physiology will be followed by information on behavioral hearing testing of infants and young children and interpretation of audiograms. The fundamentals of objective tests such as tympanometry, otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem testing will also be presented, with additional information on testing children with additional disabilities (ASD, etc.).

EDU 236B DHH: Audiology - Amplification (3 unit)
This course focuses on the development of an understanding of amplification as it relates to the child with a hearing loss. Candidates become familiar with the fitting, use and care of hearing aids, cochlear implants, auditory brainstem implants, and assistive listening devices. Issues related to classroom acoustics and wide-area listening systems are also discussed.

EDU 237A DHH: Language in Early Childhood (3 unit)
This course is designed to develop an understanding of the nature of language and how it develops in typically developing children and children with a hearing loss, ages birth to five years. The course explores the nature of language, what we understand about it, how the theoretical perspectives about language acquisition have changed over the years, and how these changes have influenced research and language programs for children with hearing loss. With this foundation, the course covers theories that address the development of language in typical children, including children learning two or more languages, the descriptive data that outlines language processes and growth in very young children and how young children with hearing loss can acquire language in a developmental manner.

EDU 237B DHH: Language in Learners 5-22 (3 unit)
This course is an extension of EDU 237A DHH: Language in Early Childhood. The course examines and applies language development principles to school-age children with an emphasis on children whose hearing loss is late identified, or who are delayed in the development of a language system. Issues related to cultural differences, bilingualism, assessment and planning as part of the IEP process, language acquisition in both special-day classroom and individual-therapy settings, transition into the mainstream and general education curriculum, outcomes related to sign language, cued speech, and the role of families will be discussed.

EDU 238A DHH: Early Childhood Curricula (3 unit)
This course develops students' understanding of educational theories as a basis for creating learning environments that best meet the needs of preschool children, 3 to 5 years of age, including children with hearing loss. Students also develop an understanding of the service delivery system and various placements for preschool children with hearing loss.

EDU 238B DHH: Early Childhood Practicum (2 unit)
This course is the practicum companion to EDU 238A DHH: Early Childhood Curricula. This practicum develops the student's standard-based knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to educational theories in creating learning environments that best meet the needs of preschool children, 3 to 5 years of age, including children with hearing loss. Candidates are responsible for creating and implementing early childhood curricular standards in the practicum setting based on the Reggio Emilia model of preschool education. The focus of the practicum experience is on curriculum, instructional planning, and delivery that addresses the individual needs of students with hearing loss and typical hearing in early childhood settings. Theory, practice, and research are integrated into activities designed to provide education specialists with multiple strategies for working with students, parents, paraeducators and ancillary professionals in early childhood settings. This course stresses the implementation of individual educational plans (IEPs). Seminar time assists the student to prepare lesson plans and activities to implement during the practicum.

EDU 239A DHH: Curricula for Learners 5-22 (3 unit)
This course builds on students' knowledge of curriculum theories and strategies in the general education setting and their application to children and youth from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds who have hearing losses. Topics address learning theory and pedagogical knowledge for the purpose of helping children with hearing losses achieve standards in core areas of the curriculum, including language arts, mathematics, social studies and science. Transition planning and resources for older children/youth is discussed. The course will focus on ways of supporting parents, general education teachers, paraprofessionals and other team members, including how to use community resources and technology to promote the development of children's learning and thinking.

EDU 239B DHH: Practicum for Learners 5-22 (3 unit)
This course is a practicum experience in teaching learners with hearing loss in school settings 5-22. The focus is on a sequence of observations, applications, and evaluations of various pedagogical approaches in a variety of settings with children with hearing loss. The student plans instruction for a class based on state-mandated content area standards. Theory, practice, and research are integrated into activities designed to provide DHH education specialists with a multiplicity of strategies and techniques for working with students, paraeducators, general educators and ancillary professionals across the spectrum of education options. This course stresses the implementation of individual educational plans, including differentiation of learning for English Language Learners and children with multiple challenges. Seminar time allows for guidance and reflection on the practicum experience.

EDU 240 Curriculum Design and Evaluation (3)
This course prepares teachers to take leadership roles in curriculum and program design. Using principles of Understanding by Design, teachers will identify standards-based student outcomes and design curricula that will enable students to reach those academic goals. These curriculum design skills will be used to critically analyze and adapt existing curricula as well as design new curricula. Teachers will develop skills in formative and summative program evaluation to examine the effects of curriculum innovation on student performance and modify curricula based on those findings. Prerequisite: Two years teaching experience.

EDU 241 Effective Practices for Coaching and Mentoring Teachers (3)
This course introduces teacher leaders to the philosophy and practices of effective coaching and mentoring systems. It is designed to equip teacher leaders with the theoretical understanding and practical skills necessary to coach and/or mentor both beginning and experienced teachers. Teacher leaders will examine the teaching and learning philosophies of leading educators, psychologists and theorists in order to influence teachers' decision-making processes; enhance understanding of their own and others' educational philosophies; and understand how these theories affect both pedagogy and student learning. Teacher leaders will focus on increasing knowledge and skills in Cognitive Coaching to assist colleagues in developing a cycle of reflective practice and improving their pedagogy. Prerequisite: Two years teaching experience.

EDU 242 Creating Inclusive and Motivating Classroom Environments for All Students(3)
This course focuses on enhancing teachers' abilities to engage a diverse body of students, including those often described as reluctant learners, marginalized, or at risk of failure within our school system. Teachers will develop their capacity to increase student motivation through an examination of various theories linked to practical applications. For example, using principles of critical pedagogy, teachers will link curriculum to issues students face in their daily lives. Strategies learned will include those aimed at helping students build self-determination as they take responsibility for and think critically about their learning. Teachers will hone their pedagogy to enhance teacher-student relationships, maximize learning opportunities through cooperative and collaborative learning, differentiate instruction, and create an environment where all students can be successful.

EDU 243 Teacher Leadership in Professional Development (3)
Teacher leaders are often asked to develop professional development activities in their areas of expertise. This course will provide a foundation in the design of professional development programs and effective pedagogy for adult learners. Teachers will conduct a needs assessment to determine the professional development needs for their school in a particular area, design and implement a professional development program to address these needs, and evaluate the effects of the program on teaching skills and student outcomes. In addition, teachers will develop their presentation and publication skills. Prerequisite: Two years teaching experience.

EDU 244A/B National Boards Preparation Seminar (2-1)
Taught by a National Board certified teacher, this two-semester seminar will guide teachers through the preparation for the completion of the portfolio and assessment requirements for National Board certification in their discipline area. Prerequisite: Preliminary Teaching Credential and two years of teaching experience 

EDU 245A/B Formative Assessment Induction Portfolio Review (3-3)
Teachers participating in an Induction Program may submit their formative assessment induction portfolio for review for up to four graduate credit units. The portfolio is reviewed for credit according to an evaluation rubric available from the Education Department. The portfolio may be submitted for evaluation up to one year after completion of an induction program. An evaluation fee of $150 is charged. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Clear Teacher Preparation Program and participation in an approved Induction Program.

EDU 246 Grant Writing for Classroom Resources (3)
Grant writing is often the only way to obtain much needed resources for classrooms, especially when implementing innovative curricula and programs. In this course, teachers will learn how to identify grant opportunities, design a project with defined student outcomes that meet the grant specifications, develop a budget, monitor grant implementation, and write a final grant report.

EDU 250 Elementary Instruction: Theory and Practice (3)
This course is designed to provide growth in effective instructional and management methods within the context of a diverse society. It is the introductory professional preparation course for the Elementary Teacher Preparation Program. Using an interactive and collaborative format, teacher candidates will examine current theory and discuss and practice ways to create positive learning environments for all children, including those learning English. Candidates will learn to use a variety of teaching strategies that support multiple learning styles, different lesson plan formats, and to self-asses their teaching practice. Candidates will also examine their own life experiences and how they influence their teaching philosophy. Candidates will have an opportunity to expand their teaching and management skills through focused observations and participation in an MSMC Teacher Center classroom where the educators are familiar with current instructional theory and practice. If the candidate is already teaching, he/she will also learn ways to look more deeply at his/her own practices. Course meetings will model and utilize effective learning techniques as wells as subject-specific pedagogy for teaching Physical Education and Health in relation to the California Content Standards and Frameworks. The course goal is to extend candidates' abilities to make decisions that are appropriate for a diverse student population where many are just learning English. Note: On-site school observations require weekly visits of 1-2 hours during the instructional day, as well as travel time to and from the fieldwork site. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. (Starting Fall 2012, Requires concurrent enrollment with EDU 207 and EDU 208A) (Often cross-listed with EDU 150)

EDU 251 Child and Adolescent Development and Learning Across Cultures (3)
Analyzes learning for both typical and atypical, development in children through adulthood across cultures and explores the complementary and interdependent relationships of biology and culture. Historical and global comparisons will be made to contemporary Angelino children as well as to the educator's personal experience. Emphasis is placed on developing a personal philosophy of how we, as a society and as individuals, can work to give children healthy foundations that support growth and learning. The course addresses major laws, concepts and principles as they are associated to creating a supportive, healthy environment for students who may or may not experience a disability. Credential candidates study the intrinsic and extrinsic effects of student health and safety when learning how to access school and community resources in order to constructively meet the legal and individual needs of a student, their families and their community. Note: This course will begin to include the focus on atypical development and learning

EDU 251A Typical and Atypical Child and Adolescent Development (1)
Candidates establish a basic understanding of the stages for human development ranging from prenatal through adulthood and the atypical factors that may influence or disrupt the learning stages throughout a lifetime. Numerous disabilities commonly seen in schools, social, cultural and personal influences are associated with the common consequences of atypical development. Candidates learn to effectively construct interventions for resiliency and redevelopment, for both the subject and their families. (Often cross-listed with EDU 151)

EDU 252 Diversity and Schools (3) (Beginning Spring 2013, unit value will be 1.5)
This course is designed for teacher candidates to explore the role that culture plays and has played in our lives, classrooms, city and country. Students analyze the nature and manifestations of culture, the concepts of cultural contact, and the history of cultural diversity in the United States and California. The dynamics of prejudice are studied, and emphasis is placed on delineating curriculum and practices that honor, motivate, and empower all students. Examination of personal biases and identification of areas of deficient knowledge is encouraged. Use of the Los Angeles community as a powerful resource will be explored.

EDU 253 Language Competence and Education (3)
This course is designed to provide general and special educators with a foundational background in applied linguistics as it relates to K-12 instruction with applications for students with limited English proficiency and students with language learning disabilities. Topics to be covered include the structure of English; linguistic variation; language development in first- and second-language learners; disorders of language development, and implications for creating classroom environments that promote language development.

EDU 254 Mathematics and Science: Elementary Curriculum (3)
This course examines mathematics and science concepts and theories and their application in teaching. A major focus is on constructivist learning and inquiry and related instructional methods and assessment procedures. Concrete, manipulative materials critical to the learning of mathematics and science are used throughout the course. Emphasis is placed on both individual and group participation as well as differentiated instruction for a range of students from struggling to gifted. Note: Observation and participation in exemplary mathematics and science learning environments plus travel time is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisite: EDU 250 (Often cross-listed with EDU 154)

EDU 255 Social Science and the Arts: Elementary Curriculum (3)
This course is a professional preparation course for the teaching of history-social science and the visual and performing arts in elementary classrooms. Central to the course are the concepts and skills required for the effective planning and teaching of social studies and the arts in relation to the California Content Standards and Frameworks. Credential candidates' study will include recognizing the scope and sequence of curricula; the use of technology and community resources; and understanding the knowledge, skills, and values that can be gained through these disciplines. Candidates use backward design to create an original curriculum unit in which integration between the social sciences and the arts is a primary focus. Varied instructional strategies, multiple means of assessment, and support for all learners including those learning English will be addressed. Note: Observation and participation in community instructional settings plus travel time is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork sites. Prerequisites: EDU 250. (Often cross-listed with EDU 155)

EDU 256 Language and Literacy: Elementary Curriculum (3)
This course focuses on the elements of language and literacy learning in the elementary grades and methods for teaching a comprehensive, balanced literacy program to the full range of learners, which includes, but is not limited to struggling readers, students with special needs, English learners, speakers of non-standard English, and advanced learners.. Current theoretical and practical aspects of language arts curriculum and instruction will be learned.. These include systematic, explicit instruction and strategies for developing a comprehensive, balanced literacy program for native English speakers and English language learners; assessment skills necessary for helping individual students; and exploring appropriate materials. Methods and principles for developing proficient readers and writers and for analyzing students' strengths and areas of needed growth will be studied and practiced. Collaborative methods and inclusive practices will be implemented through a co-teaching model by Education Specialist and General Education faculty. Note: Fifteen hours of focused observations and participation (plus travel time) are required in an exemplary elementary school classroom during language arts instruction. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisites: EDU 207 or 253 and EDU 250. Starting in Fall 2012 the course also requires concurrent enrollment with EDU 208B and EDU 252.

EDU 266 Principles of Secondary Education and Content Area Modules (4)
The Principles of Secondary Education course is the initial professional preparation course in the Secondary Teacher Preparation Program. This course provides opportunities to assess student development and to design and deliver instruction informed by contemporary learning theory and research, practical experience, and inquiry. The role of the teacher is examined as one who assists student performance, with special attention to the needs of adolescents, English learners, Special Needs students, and urban populations and settings. The course addresses numerous teaching strategies such as Socratic Method, Problem Based Learning, Cooperative Learning, and/or Literature Circles. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies. Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline. The coursework and fieldwork include multiple, systematic opportunities for candidates to understand and use instructional practices that promote English language development, including management of first and second languages, classroom organization, and participation by specialists and paraprofessionals. (Often cross-listed with EDU 166) Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 267 Principles of Secondary Curriculum and Content Area Modules (4)
The Principles of Secondary Curriculum course is a continuation of EDU 266 and focuses on the teacher as curricular decision-maker and instructional designer. Candidates deepen their knowledge of assessment of student development, design and delivery of instruction, and educational equity. Candidates use backwards design to create longer connected learning sequences or units of instruction and develop performance assessments anchored in the California content standards for their discipline. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies. Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline. (Often cross-listed with EDU 167) Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisite: EDU 266

EDU 268 Content-Based Reading Instruction and Content Area Modules (4)
Content-Based Reading Instruction encompasses language and literacy development in secondary curricula and methods for enhancing that development with multiethnic, multilingual student populations. The interwoven nature of speaking, reading, writing, and listening in content area instruction will be explored, with emphasis on the importance of content-based discourse in the development of disciplinary understanding and critical thinking. Course content includes instructional and assessment strategies for students learning English as well as those with special needs. Beginning Fall 2013, the course will be co-taught with an instructor from the Education Specialist credential program and will model strategies for having multiple professionals in the classroom. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies. Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline. (Often cross-listed with EDU 268) Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisites: EDU 207, EDU 266, and EDU 267 .

EDU 270A Introduction to the Education of Exceptional Learners (1)
This course is designed to introduce teacher preparation candidates to the general educators' role and responsibilities in the education of exceptional learners in the general education classroom. Characteristics of students with disabilities and gifted and talented students are explored as candidates visit programs for exceptional learners. Candidates develop basic skills in the assessment of the learning and language abilities of exceptional learners and apply their knowledge of the state and federal laws pertaining to the education of students with disabilities during a class simulation of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting. Special attention is given to modifying instruction to meet the needs of exceptional learners. (Often cross-listed with EDU 170A) Fulfills the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Level I special education requirement for the Preliminary and Professional Clear Credential.

EDU 270B Special Populations: Supporting Educational Equity and Access (2)
This course reviews the historical and philosophical significance of special education and the education of gifted and talented students and effective practices for meeting these students' needs in a general education environment. The legal and administrative framework for the education of exceptional learners in California is addressed with an emphasis on the policies and procedures in the candidate's school district for identifying and providing services for these students. Coursework will emphasize the development of positive, inclusive classrooms with differentiated instruction designed to enable all students to achieve at high performance levels. All course requirements will be applied in the teacher's current teaching assignment.

EDU 270C Foundations for the Education of Exceptional Learners (3)
This course is designed as a pre-service course for special education candidates, in particular, interns. The legal and administrative framework for the education of exceptional learners in California is addressed with an emphasis on the policies and procedures for identifying and providing services for these students. Coursework will emphasize the development of positive, inclusive classrooms with differentiated instruction designed to enable all students to achieve at high performance levels. In coursework and accompanying fieldwork, candidates will be introduced to the practical skills they will need to establish and manage a classroom learning environment for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Candidates will learn foundational skills for classroom management skills, conducting classroom assessments of student learning needs, and designing instructional programs that meet student needs and are grounded in the California curriculum standards. Candidates will be introduced to the processes and procedures for development of an Individualized Instruction Plan and the support services that are available for students with special needs.

EDU 271 Assessment of Students with Special Needs (3)
Candidates learn the principles and methods of assessing students with disabilities and how the use of statistical data is applied to the legal and educational structures for eligibility of service, and the program planning and progress monitoring of student performance. Best practices and interventions are derived from formal and informal measurement results that account for various language/cultural, communication and cognitive abilities. Individual and group assessment results are processed and reported for data analysis and service design.

EDU 272 Positive Behavior Supports for Students with Special Needs (3)
Candidates learn to apply implicit and explicit structures that create a positive classroom environment and constructive learning experiences for students requiring specific behavioral supports. The topics examined include the administration of legal and ethical processes and proactive interventions of social justice to address the construct of behavioral, emotional and social functions for the individual and the community. (This course is required for the ED and ASD Authorization)

EDU 275 Literacy Instruction for Struggling Readers and Writers (3)
This course is designed to meet the competencies required for language arts instruction for the Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential and to prepare general educators to meet the language arts instructional needs of general education students who experience literacy development problems. Assessment and instructional strategies drawn from diverse perspectives (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, social-interaction) are presented and examined relative to their effectiveness. Reading and writing difficulties are examined across the K-12 continuum. Emphasis is on application of literacy assessment and instructional strategies in actual teaching settings with students experiencing reading delays. Fieldwork Requirements: 10 hours assessing and instructing a K-12 student experiencing significant reading delay. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 276 Content Area Instruction for Students with Special Needs (3)
In this course the candidate draws upon the knowledge and skills requisite for effective content area instruction in the general education classroom with necessary adaptations to make the curriculum accessible to students with special needs. Emphasis is placed on the creation of curriculum units that incorporate learning strategies approaches for instruction of students with mild/moderate disabilities and instructional modifications for students with limited English proficiency and students with below grade level literacy skills. Content area instruction in math, science and social studies for students with mild to moderate disabilities in grades four through twelve is addressed. Fieldwork requirements: Ten hours in a special education setting for students with mild/moderate disabilities at the intermediate to high school levels. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 278 Program Leadership for Education Specialists
Candidates will gain the comprehensive skills for program caseload management, curriculum planning and implementation, student transitions, promotion of advocacy, team coordination, family/community involvement, and professional training. Advanced level problem solving and program leadership is conceptualized through the practices of collaborative partnerships for: responsive teaching instruction, theory based intervention strategies, and the constructs of inclusion.

EDU 279 Supporting Students with Neurological Disorders  
Advanced level educators design and implement an educational program for students identified within the paradigm of neurodevelopment or genetic disorders. Candidates learn to address the unique needs associated with motor abilities, sensory integration, cognitive processing, communications skills, behavior, and academic/social performance. Candidates gain the skills to supplement and coordinate the learning and functioning environments for student impairments and delays. (This course is required for the ASD Authorization.)

EDU 281 Advanced Issues in Assessment & Instruction of Students with Special Needs (3)
In this advanced course, candidates acquire knowledge and skills to appropriately assess and instruct students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Course content includes selecting and administering a variety of formal and informal assessment procedures in order to be able to teach, adapt and integrate curriculum appropriate to the educational needs of students. Prerequisite: Preliminary Level I Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential .

EDU 282 Consultation and Collaboration for Students with Special Needs (3)
This course will provide opportunities for candidates to develop skills in communication, collaboration and consultation with teachers and other school personnel, community professionals and parents. A specific area of emphasis will be on the communication of relevant social, academic, and behavioral information in the areas of assessment, curriculum behavior management, social adjustment and legal requirements. At the completion of the course, candidates will be prepared to coordinate the process involved in special education placements. Prerequisite: Preliminary teaching credential.

EDU 283 Supportive Environments for Students with Behavioral and Emotional Needs (3)
In this advanced course, candidates develop systems for academic and social skills instruction for students with complex behavioral and emotional needs including attention disorders, conduct disorders, depression and suicidal behavior, psychotic behavior, anxiety and related disorders, and delinquency and substance abuse. Course content includes advanced study of behavioral supports, social skills instruction, crisis management, and positive learning environments. Collaborative work with other professionals and community agencies is emphasized in the development of comprehensive support programs for these students. Prerequisite: Preliminary teaching credential and EDU 272

EDU 289 English Learners: Supporting Educational Equity and Access (2)
This advanced course for teachers focuses on the delivery of specialized instruction for English learners to support equity in access to the core curriculum. Teachers will become knowledgeable about instructional programs, school organizational structures, and resources designed to meet the needs of English learners, particularly those in their own district. They will develop skills in designing, implementing and evaluating instructional programs to support English language development and access to the core academic curriculum for English learners. Teachers will use assessments of English learners, such as the California English Language Development Test, to diagnose students' language abilities relative to the core academic curriculum and plan appropriate instruction. Course assignments require application of principles in the teacher's current teaching context.

EDU 296A Masters Project Proposal (2)
Students work with their project advisor in this course to design a proposal for an action research project to be completed in their classroom. The masters project provides an opportunity for the candidate to develop competency in researching an issue relevant to their teaching practice, designing and implementing a project focused on this issue that will improve their practice, and preparing and presenting a report of the research findings. Prerequisite: EDU 200 (concurrent accepted), official score report with a passing score on all subtests of the required CSET subject matter examination.

EDU 296B Masters Project(1)
Candidates work with their project advisor in this course to implement their masters project proposal and write the final project report. Candidates are coached and advised regarding areas of strength and areas where improvements are needed. Prerequisite: EDU 200 and satisfactory completion of EDU 296A as evidenced by an approved masters project proposal.

EDU 296C Case Study Inquiry & Report Seminar I(1)
Candidates work with the instructor in this course to create and conduct a case study that builds upon the foundational knowledge and skills regarding responsive teaching learned in program coursework. This provides candidates the opportunity to collect data on their project and evaluate the results, discussing implications for their future teaching. The Case Study Inquiry & Report provides an opportunity for candidates to develop competency in researching an issue relevant to their teaching practice, designing and implementing a case study project focused on this issue that will improve their practice, and preparing and presenting a report of the research findings.

EDU 296D Case Study Inquiry & Report Seminar II(2)
Students will continue to work with the instructor in this course to complete the analysis and reflection phase of the Case Study Inquiry & Report. Upon completion of the Case Study Report, students will share their results in a formal Masters Sharing Poster Presentation at the end of the semester.

EDU 299 Special Studies in Education (3)
Courses on special topics in education. May be repeated for credit.

EDU 316A Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Elementary Fieldwork (6)
(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site.

EDU 316B Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Elementary Fieldwork (6)
Supervised teaching is designed as the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and provides opportunities for the candidate to integrate and refine the many competencies acquired throughout the program. The goal of supervised teaching is to ensure that the candidate is prepared to assume the full-time responsibilities of a classroom. In EDU 316A and EDU 316B the student assumes the responsibilities of the classroom teacher and is under the direct supervision of an experienced and effective teacher and a college supervisor at MSMC selected sites (see Option I, in the Supervised Teaching section). The supervised teaching involves two assignments, each spanning one-half of the semester in two schools, and at two grade levels (primary and intermediate). Students register for EDU 316A for the first assignment and for EDU 316B for the second assignment. Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the seminar (EDU 323 or EDU 210). The student must have access to daily transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 316C Supervised Teaching: In-Service Elementary Fieldwork (6)
Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom. In EDU 316C, In-service teachers (private school or one-year interns) are supervised in their own classrooms over one or two semesters (6 units per semester) by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option II, in the Supervised Teaching section). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the seminar (EDU 323 or 210). In-service teachers who are not eligible to waive six units of supervised teaching may repeat EDU 316C one time for a total of 12 units of credit.

EDU 316D Supervised Teaching: Intern Elementary Fieldwork ( (3)
Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom. Two-year elementary interns enroll in EDU 316D for three units each fall and spring semester of their program. Interns teach in their own classrooms and are supervised by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option III, in the Supervised Teaching section.). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the intern seminar (EDU 323i). Interns can repeat EDU 316D four times for a total of 12 units of credit. (Intern Support Fee of $100 beginning Fall 2013 replaces EDU 323i requirement.)

EDU 321 - Professional Induction Planning Seminar (.5)
Candidates for the Professional Level II Education Specialist credential are required to take this course at the beginning of their Level II program. During this individualized seminar, the candidate develops a Professional Induction Plan with an assigned district support provider and a college advisor.

EDU 322 Professional Induction Evaluation Seminar (.5)
This seminar is the culminating experience for the Professional Education Specialist credential program. Students reevaluate their professional competency to assess and teach culturally diverse students with learning and behavior problems. They compile a Professional Educator Portfolio, which includes artifacts documenting their professional competence and a plan for their continuing professional growth. The district support provider and the college advisor continue to support the student in this process.

EDU 323 Supervised Teaching Culminating Seminar (2)
This course is the final seminar in the Teacher Preparation Program. Taken concurrently with the supervised teaching fieldwork, if required, it provides a culminating forum for discussion, reflection, and goal-setting toward developing professionalism as a teacher. Course activities will extend candidates' understanding of key concepts and principles in the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and allow candidates to demonstrate competence on the Teaching Performance Assessment. Elementary, secondary and special education students enroll in separate sections of EDU 323. The last semester this course will be offered will be Fall 2013. Beginning Spring 2014, candidates will take EDU 210 (3 units) to satisfy requirements met in this course. (Often cross-listed with EDU 123 or 110)

EDU 323i Supervised Teaching Culminating Seminar
This course section for Interns is the final seminar in the Teacher Preparation Program. Taken concurrently with the supervised teaching fieldwork, if required, it provides a culminating forum for discussion, reflection, and goal-setting toward developing professionalism as a teacher. Course activities will extend candidates' understanding of key concepts and principles in the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and allow candidates to demonstrate competence on the Teaching Performance Assessment. Elementary, secondary and special education students enroll in separate sections of EDU 323. Interns enroll in the seminar for 0.5 (two-year interns) or 1 (one-year interns) unit during each semester of their program. The last semester this course will be offered will be Fall 2013. Beginning Spring 2014, candidates will take EDU 210 (3 units) to satisfy requirements met in this course. (Often cross-listed with EDU 123/323 or EDU 110/210)

EDU 364A Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Secondary Fieldwork (6)
(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site.

EDU 364B Supervised Teaching: Per-Service Secondary Fieldwork (6)
(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site. Supervised teaching is designed as the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and provides opportunities for the candidate to integrate and refine the many competencies acquired throughout the program. The goal of supervised teaching is to ensure that the candidate is prepared to assume the full-time responsibilities of a classroom. In EDU 364A and EDU 364B the student assumes the responsibilities of the classroom teacher and is under the direct supervision of an experienced and effective teacher and a college supervisor (see Option I, Supervised Teaching section ). The supervised teaching involves two assignments, each spanning one-half of the semester in two schools, and at two grade levels (middle school and high school). Students register for EDU364A for the first assignment and for EDU 364B for the second assignment. Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the seminar (EDU 323 or EDU 210). The student must have access to daily transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 364C Supervised Teaching: In-Service Secondary Fieldwork (6)
Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom. In EDU 364C, in-service teachers (private or one-year interns) are supervised in their own classrooms over one or two semesters (6 units per semester) by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option II, Supervised Teaching.). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the seminar (EDU 323 or EDU 210). In-service teachers who are not eligible to waive six units of supervised teaching may repeat EDU 364C one time for a total of 12 units of credit.

EDU 364D Supervised Teaching: Intern Secondary Fieldwork (3)
Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom. Two-year secondary interns enroll in EDU 364D for three units each fall and spring semester of their program. Interns teach in their own classrooms and are supervised by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option III, Supervised Teaching). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the intern seminar (EDU 323i). Interns can repeat EDU 364D four times for a total of 12 units of credit. (Intern Support Fee of $100 beginning Fall 2013 replaces EDU 323i requirement.)

378A Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Special Education (6)
Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site. (Additional fieldwork fee of $150)

378B EDU 378B Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Special Education (6)
Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site. (Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Supervised teaching is designed as the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and provides opportunities for the candidate to integrate and refine the many competencies acquired throughout the program. The goal of supervised teaching is to ensure that the candidate is prepared to assume the full-time responsibilities of a classroom. In EDU 378A and EDU 378B, the student assumes the responsibilities of the classroom teacher and is under the direct supervision of an experienced and effective teacher and a college supervisor (see Option I, Supervised Teaching). The supervised teaching involves two assignments, each spanning one-half of the semester in two special education settings for students with mild/moderate disabilities, and at two grade levels. Students register for EDU378A for the first assignment and for EDU 378B for the second assignment. Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the seminar (EDU 323 or EDU 210). The student must have access to daily transportation to the fieldwork site. Students who have a general education teaching credential or two years or more of general education teaching experience may petition to waive 6 units of the supervised teaching requirement on the basis of their experience. These students complete one seven-week assignment in a special education classroom in one of the MSMC affiliated schools (EDU 378A, 6 units).

378C Supervised Teaching: In-Service Special Education (6)
Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom EDU 378C is designed for one-year special education interns. Teachers teach in their own classrooms over one or two semesters (6 units per semester) and are supervised by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option II, Supervised Teaching on page 12). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the seminar (EDU 323 or EDU 210). Students repeat EDU 378C one time for a total of 12 units of credit.

378D Supervised Teaching: Intern Special Education (3)
Fall or Spring in candidate's own classroom Two-year education specialist interns enroll in EDU 378D for three units each fall and spring semester of their program. Interns teach in their own classrooms and are supervised by an on-site supervisor and a college supervisor (see Option III, Supervised Teaching on page 12). Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the intern seminar (EDU 323i). Interns can repeat EDU 378D four times for a total of 12 units of credit. (Intern Support Fee of $100 beginning Fall 2013 replaces EDU 323i requirement.)

EDUX 705XL Creativity in the Classroom (3)
The Creativity in the Classroom series consists of five engaging workshops including drawing, painting, ceramics, dance, music, drama, poetry and playmaking. The series is designed for those new to teaching the visual and performing arts as well as those with a full range of experience. In the course, participants explore their own creativity and gain skills and knowledge to integrate a variety of arts disciplines into language arts, social studies, science and math. They are introduced to the Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards and explore discussion strategies that apply to the arts and to all student work. Strong emphasis is placed on practices that support the creation of a safe, supportive environment for creative exploration and expression. Community Building and English Language Development strategies are part of each session. The course is appropriate for classroom teachers, teaching artists and other interested community members.