Master of Arts in the Humanities
Mount Saint Mary's College
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Summer 2014

May 17 - 18
May 31- June 1
June 21 - 22
July 12 - 13
July 26 - 27
August 16 - 17

Creative Writing

HUM 233 CW Non-Fiction: Memoir
SATURDAY
Syllabus
Instructor
: Shonda Buchanana
This creative writing course will introduce students to the craft of writing the Memoir, one sub-genre in the vast genre that is Creative Nonfiction. We will explore elements of the personal narrative, isolate structure, style, voice, content and context of memoirs as well as write your own (short) memoir. Through discussions, writing prompts, essays, workshops, and our readings, this class will help you develop and deepen your knowledge of the genre and the writers, and develop fluency in your writing.

HUM230CW Fiction: Short Story
SUNDAY
Syllabus
Instructor: Joan Johnson
This course will focus on the craft of writing short stories with scenes that keep the reader on the edge of the seat, or maybe grab the reader by the seat of the pants, and knock some socks off. In words other than clichés, this class is for writers who want to gain power that brings attention to the work on a professional platform. This course is not a workshop where we sit around and praise each other with gratuitous platitudes, not for those who want to feed the ego and escape the hard work of writing well enough to take them to the next level. I’m not saying we will not reflect on the past, the present and learn from the successful stories of our peers, but we will also experiment with the art of telling stories in order to follow Ezra Pound’s dictum to “Make it new.” So, if you want to learn some tricks of the trade, and be inspired to create some dynamic stories of your own with a chance of getting into print, this class is for you. We will work; really work on crafting scenes that dig deep into the psyche of the characters and the readers at the same time, starting with the examples of Julio Cortazar and Gabriel Maria Marquez, Junot Diaz and ZZ Packer. All experience levels are welcome.

History

HUM264H American Transcendentalism
SATURDAY
Syllabus
Instructor
: Pat Ash
This course takes a historical look at the first generation of public intellectuals in America, viewing Transcendentalism as not only a literary phenomenon but also as an important moment in American religious history and a movement interested in reforming society.  The course focuses on the lives and work of the major Transcendentalists, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, and Margaret Fuller, explores what both the lives and the works have to tell us about the antebellum era in the United States..

HUM269H Western Esoteric Tradition
SUNDAY

Syllabus
Instructo
r: Jane Crawford
Along with the Classical Greek and Roman and Judeo-Christian  traditions, there is a third intellectual way, the esoteric tradition. Tracing its roots back to Hellenistic mysticism and Egyptian syncretistism , hermeticism and magic. Esotericism includes Gnosticism in the early Christian centuries up to occult groups such as Rosicrucians, Freemasons, alchemists, Theosophists. If you are a seeker or just a fan of “hidden wisdom” ideas, come along with us.
 

English

HUM243E Voices from the Margins
SATURDAY
Syllabus
Instructor
: Ana Thorne
The list of ‘voices from the margins’ works and authors represent women from several walks of life, across a broad timeline and geography, and of various ethnicities.  In addition to autobiography, fiction and memoir, these works incorporate speculative fiction (aka science fiction) set in a historical context, and include work from a writer who lived with a disability. The characters tell their stories of dislocation, ridicule, ostracism, suspicion, and transformation from their individual womanist points of view.

HUM235E Faulkner and Morrison
SUNDAY
Syllabus
Instructor
: Millie Kidd
This seminar will focus on William Faulkner and Toni Morrison, two Nobel Prize winning American writers whose works deal with many of the same issues and themes but from very different perspectives.  Both are master storytellers, whose innovative narrative techniques changed American literature and influenced writers all over the world.  Both writers draw heavily on the past to create mythic worlds and complicated stories about ordinary people.  Our study will focus on each author’s concern for individual identity and will consider biographical, critical, and historical context as well as issues of gender, race, and class.

Cultural Studies


HUM280CS Culture and Literature: Constructing Irishness
SATURDAY
Syllabus
Instructor
: Justine VanMeter
In this course, we will explore literary, visual, and historical works that grapple with the complex process of constructing national, cultural, and/or individual identity.  Much of our focus with the assigned readings will involve past and present/colonial and postcolonial representations of Irish history. Through these works, we will investigate how memory and trauma (among many other topics we will undoubtedly address throughout the semester) play a role in constructing a contemporary sense of what it means to be “Irish.”  Readings will include a variety of short stories, novels, essays, poetry, and critical works.
 

One-Unit Courses

HUM240E Genre: The Novella
JUNE 8-9
Instructor
: Melissa Berry
This class will study the novella as form while focusing on the themes of forbidden love, illicit passion, lost love, and the consequences. These themes are presented through self-deception and discovery, sin and violence, guilt and fear using methods from the seemingly benign to the toxic; the hopeful to despair. Each selection is very different from the other with the works of DH Lawrence (“The Fox”), Edith Wharton (“Ethan Frome”), Thomas Mann (“Death in Venice”), and Stephen Crane (“Maggie: A Girl of the Streets”). None will take longer than several hours to read. All must be read in preparation for the class.

HUM225 Calvin and Calvinism
JUNE 28-29
Syllabus
Instructor
: Dan Van Dyke
This course will delve into the theology of John Calvin, his influence on the Protestant Reformation of the 16th Century and how his theology and thought on sacraments, grace, salvation, sin and redemption have been translated into such Christian denominations as the Reformed Church, Presbyterianism, Congregationalism and Evangelicalism of the present day.   The course will address Calvin's interaction with such contemporary reformers as Luther, Zwingli and Knox, his critique of the Council of Trent and his difficulties with the Anabaptists and the so-called Libertines of 16th Century Europe.

HUM245E Shakespeare in the Park
AUGUST 2-3
Instructor
: Bianca Ryan-Lopez
 

Capstone Courses and Electives

HUM 296A Capstone Proposal Workshop
JUNE 7 and AUGUST 2 ONLY
Instructor
: Millie Kidd

HUM 296B Thesis
2 UNITS
Instructor
: Millie Kidd

HUM 297A,B,C,D Capstone Continuation
Instructor
: Millie Kidd

HUM 299A Approaches to Teaching
Instructor
: (TBD)
This one-unit class provides instruction and practice in pedagogical method. Students act as Teaching Assistants during the term under the guidance of an assigned lead professor. Students also read and discuss articles on pedagogical issues and submit an essay at the end of the semester. Successful completion of the course also depends upon a positive report submitted by the lead professor. The class meets at the beginning of the semester on June 8 for Teacher Training and again on the final weekend on August 16 for half a day. During the semester, students meet for one-hour lunches during teaching weekends to discuss practices and issues that arise in their classrooms as well as the readings.
Prerequisites: To be eligible, students will have completed their Humanities coursework and be at the thesis writing stage.

HUM 299B Internship
Instructor
: (TBD)