Portmont Liberal Arts
Mount Saint Mary's College
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Liberal Arts

Course Descriptions

ENG 1A Freshman English (3)
Completion with a grade of C (2.0) or better and a score of 4 or better on the Writing Exit test fulfills Communication Skills requirement in writing for both the Associate and Baccalaureate degrees. Principles and practice of writing with attention to analytical reading. Includes discussion skills, library usage, research techniques, and an introduction to literature. Completion with a grade of C or better.

ENG 1B Freshman English (3)
Completion with a grade of C (2.0) or better and a score of 4 or better on the Writing Exit test fulfills Communication Skills requirement in writing for both the Associate and Baccalaureate degrees. Principles and practice of writing with attention to analytical reading. Includes discussion skills, library usage, research techniques, and an introduction to literature. Completion with a grade of C or better.

SPE 10 Intro to Communication (2)
Introduction to basic principles of communication theory in both small and large groups together with practice in discussion and speech delivery.

ART 5 Fundamentals of Art (3)
Illustrated lecture through the use of slides and videos on the development of art forms from around the world. History from earliest time periods through contemporary life. Various modes of painting, sculpture, architecture, and crafts will be studied. A few of the classes will be devoted to a hands-on exploration of some of these art forms.

MUS 6 Varieties of Music (3)
Beginning with an introduction to the world and language of music, this course explores the richness of the art of sound from varieties of avenues in order to heighten awareness, understanding and appreciation of this art. Emphasis on the diversity and stylistic development of music as it reflects the times and world cultures. Both MUS 6/106 may be taken for Honors Credit. Designed for non-music majors.

ENG 15 Literature and Society (3)
Examination of society's accomplishments and vexations in selected literary works that portray human striving in family, nation, and technological world. May be repeated for credit.

HIS 1A Western Civilization I (3)
An historical study of the major elements in human heritage designed to introduce the student to the ideas, attitudes, and institutions basic to western civilization.

HIS 1B Western Civilization II (3)
An historical study of the major elements in human heritage designed to introduce the student to the ideas, attitudes, and institutions basic to western civilization.

ECO 2 Macroeconomics (3)
An introductory analysis of the aggregate economic system. This course discusses methods of recording and determining gross national product, employment, price stability, fiscal and monetary policy.

PHS 1 Scientific Concepts (3)
This introductory course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge of the scientific principles that govern our environment. The primary emphasis is chemistry, including an overview of the properties of chemicals with a closer look at the atom, the elements, and chemical bonds and reactions. Also addressed are topics in Physics such as mechanics, heat and energy. This course will provide students with the foundation needed for continued study in the sciences and applied fields such as nursing.

PSY 1 General Psychology (3)
This course is an introduction to the study of mental processes and behavior. The course will survey major concepts, research findings, and practical applications of current research. The course focuses on questions such as: How do people change and grow from infancy to adulthood? How do we learn and remember best? How does biology influence behavior? How do our senses help us to interpret the world? How does personality work? How do other people affect our behavior? What does it mean to be "abnormal"?

SOC 1 Intro to Sociology (3)
An introduction to the scientific study of human social behavior, including the foundational theories and the basic elements of social research. Viewing human life as inherently social, the social and environmental forces which influence and are influenced by personal experience, culture, and social arrangements, are examined. A human rights course.

SPR 86 Portmont College 101 (3)
This course is designed to assist new students in successfully transitioning into MSMC?s rigorous online and blended learning format. College Success specialists conduct this in-person intensive session. Course topics may include time-management, effective utilization of college technology, self-care and stress management, academic planning, career planning and introduction to college resources.

SPR 25 Scholar Mentor Seminar / Peer Tutoring (1)
A survey of the issues and skills needed for successful peer tutoring. Emphasis is placed on understanding of tutoring principles and practices important for initiating a productive tutorial relationship. Permission of instructor is required.

RST 61 World Religions (3)
A survey of the largest religious traditions: includes Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Other religions may be added (e.g., Confucian/Taoism at the discretion of professor). This course focuses on the following: the religion's historical development, its sacred texts, essentials in its way of life, its spiritual life and arts, and distinctive truths about ultimate realities and the unique purpose of human life and afterlife hopes. Prerequisite for RST 161: A lower division course in the same area.

PHI 21 Moral Values and Ethical Decisions (3)
This course is an introduction to moral reasoning and ethical decision-making, with a focus on fundamental ethical theories. Using the different theories, we examine some major moral dilemmas we face (such as the death penalty, world hunger, environmental ethics, abortion, sexual morality, censorship).

MTH 10 Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematical Ideas (3)
Ideas in mathematics chosen to emphasize problem-solving, decision-making, economic productivity and real-world applications. Recommended to fulfill GS IIIE requirement absent other major requirements. Topics include critical thinking, inductive reasoning, problem solving, numbers, finances, statistics, probability, geometry, algebra and exponential functions. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on Mathematics Placement Examination or completion of MTH 2X.

MTH 38 Elements of Probability and Statistics (3)
Topics in Algebra including solutions of systems of equations and inequalities; exponential and logarithmic functions; linear programming and mathematics of finance. Emphasis is placed on the application of mathematics to problems in business. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or completion of MTH 2X.

PED 1 Fitness for Freshmen (1)
Fight off the Freshmen Fifteen with this interactive class that is designed to address the specific physical activity and nutrition needs of freshmen as they transition to life in college. Students will participate in aerobic and resistance training activities as well as meal planning and nutrition logs. Students will learn to make lifestyle changes that will enhance their mental and physical health with the support of classmates and instructors.

SPA 1 Elementary Spanish I (4)
Develops the four fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis on speaking and grammar.

SPA 2 Elementary Spanish II (4)
Further develops the fundamental skills stressing reading and writing as well as vocabulary building. Prerequisite: SPA 1 or equivalent.

CIS 1 Computer Processes and Applications (3)
Description of the computer and its logical structure and functioning including hardware (processors, storage, and communications), networking, and levels of software. Introduction to BASIC programming languages and binary systems. Use of application programs for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, Internet, and e-mail.

PHI 10 Critical Thinking (3)
Students taking this course will learn reasoning techniques so they develop their skills at argumentation, spotting fallacious reasoning, examining uses of language, evaluating reasoning, examining assumptions, weighing evidence, determining credibility of witnesses, problem solving, decision-making, and applying critical thinking skills to moral reasoning, advertising, the media, and legal reasoning. This course carries credit equivalent to PHI 5.

Elective Course (3)
Choose from among the other 3-credit courses listed above to earn a total of 60 credits in the program.