Education
Mount Saint Mary's College
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Education

Course Descriptions

EDU 31 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education: Profession and Programs (3)
A study of the history, scope, and current philosophies of programs for young children. Observations in a variety of local early childhood programs, and exploration of the education and licensing requirements for such programs. Ethical and value issues in working with children and their families, as well as the importance of becoming an advocate for upgrading the profession and improving the quality of children's services, are stressed.

EDU 32/132 Early Childhood Education: Observation and Curriculum Planning (3)
Introduction and use of alternative formats for recording observations of children. Use of observational data and portfolios to diagnose children's interests, developmental levels, and learning needs. Review of basic principles of child development and their application in the early childhood setting by means of observation and curriculum planning. Opportunities to create environments that enhance cultural pluralism. Includes opportunity for observation and participation in an early childhood setting. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

EDU 33/133 The Visual and Performing Arts for the Young Child (3)
A study of the visual arts (basic concepts, theories, and techniques); dance (basic concepts, and improvisations including philosophical and practical differences among the various disciplines of dance); music (singing, listening and improvisational activities); theatre arts (creative drama, role playing, improvisation and story enactment).

EDU 36/136 Emergent Math and Science Experiences in the Preschool Classroom (3)
An exploration of ways to enhance children’s natural interest in mathematics and their disposition to use it to make sense of their physical and social worlds. Students will also learn to create preschool science programs based on the premise that young children develop science knowledge as they observe and act on the world, ask questions, make predictions, test those predictions, and reflect on their experience. Piaget's theory of cognitive development will be studied in detail.

EDU 37/137 - Infant and Toddler Development and Care (3)
This course presents an in-depth study of infant and toddler development. The principles of infant and toddler care-giving with an emphasis on the environment and appropriate learning activities will be explored. Health, safety, nutrition, and parent relations will also be discussed. Observation of infants and toddlers and programs for them is required.

EDU 39 Supervised Field Work: Preschool (6)
Instruction of children in an early childhood setting under the direction of a master teacher. Conferences with teachers and supervisors accompany this work. Weekly seminars include methods of curriculum planning and child guidance, as well as content related to children's health, safety, and nutrition.
Prerequisite: Departmental approval. This course is taken for CR/NC.

EDU 99 Special Studies (.5-3)
May be repeated for credit.

EDU 100 Introduction to Liberal Studies and the Concurrent Program of Undergraduate Teacher Preparation (1) 
An introduction to the study of the liberal arts and sciences and to the concurrent program of teacher preparation. Students are introduced to the interrelationships among subject matter areas and to the essential connection between subject matter preparation and pedagogy (methods of teaching and assessment of learning). Two program themes, diversity and technology, are introduced. Other topics include the philosophy of the liberal studies major, the goals of the concurrent program of teacher preparation and the California (Credit/No Credit) Content Specifications, which are included in the program of study. The MSMC Liberal Studies Portfolio and the California Subject Matter Examination for Teachers (CSET), as components of the final assessment of the major and subject matter preparation program, are introduced and explained.

EDU 101 Exploration of Liberal Studies (.5)
This seminar provides: (1) identification of a subject area of concentration as part of the Liberal Studies major and (2) a continuing focus on the program in relation to topics introduced in EDU 100. Students focus on: a) the relationship among the courses required for the major, b) the role of technology in society and of ethical issues surrounding the impact of technology on society, c) an understanding of the diverse ethnic, gender, cultural, and disability perspectives, and d) organization of knowledge in the major and the various teaching strategies experienced in the areas of study. Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU 100.

EDU 102 Integrative Seminar in Liberal Studies (1)
Culminating course required to complete the liberal studies major. Students examine the relationships among the disciplines included in their program of study, synthesize major themes, and compare forms of inquiry. Requirements for the Liberal Studies Portfolio are reviewed and selected requirements discussed and submitted as class assignments. Credit for EDU 102 requires the submission of the the Liberal Studies Portfolio. Students successfully completing course requirements but not the Portfolio may be assigned an "In Progress" (IP) grade. The California Subject Matter Examination for Teachers (CSET) is reviewed as a program requirement. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EDU 101.

EDU 106 School and Society (2)
The course explores major concepts and principles regarding the historical and contemporary purposes, roles and functions of formal education in American society. The course examines two primary areas: (1) the social and cultural conditions of K-12 schooling, especially as it relates to persistent inequalities in schools and the role of teachers in the creation of equitable classrooms and (2) approaches to curriculum and the use of state adopted textbooks within content areas, their relationship with state standards, and the role of teachers in the adoption and use of textbooks in promoting a just and democratic society. (Often cross-listed with EDU 206)

EDU 107 Teaching English Learners (1.5)
This course is designed to provide general education and education specialists with a foundational background in applied linguistics as it relates to K-12 instruction with applications for reading instruction and language development for students with limited English proficiency and students with language learning disabilities. Topics to be covered include the structure of English, linguistic variation, language development in first- and second-language learners, disorders of language development, and implications for creating classroom environments that promote language development. (Often cross-listed with EDU 207)

EDU 108A Intro to Exceptional Learners (1.5)
In this introduction to the assessment and instruction of students who require a broader learning experience for success, candidates will become knowledgeable about available strategies and resources designed to assist the struggling student in demonstrating their ability to learn. Candidates will gain knowledge about the federal and state legal requirements for the students with special needs. Candidates will learn to use assessments, design curriculum and respond effectively by demonstrating differentiated teaching methods of intervention relative to the core academic curriculum. (Often cross-listed with EDU 208.)

EDU 108B Responsive Teaching for All Learners (1.5)
Candidates will learn to implement appropriate assessment and instructional methods for students who require a broader learning experience for success. Candidates will become knowledgeable about available strategies and resources designed to assist the struggling student in demonstrating their ability to learn. Candidates will gain knowledge about the federal and state legal requirements for the students with special needs. Candidates will learn to use assessments, design curriculum and respond effectively by demonstrating differentiated teaching methods of intervention relative to the core academic curriculum. (Often cross-listed with EDU 208B)

EDU 109A TPA Lab I (.5)
This lab provides an opportunity for candidates to apply best practices to planning for instruction and assessment of student learning. To better prepare new teachers, the credential programs have embedded a teaching performance assessment. The assessment is designed to give candidates the opportunity to develop, refine, and demonstrate their teaching knowledge, skills, and abilities. The lab will provide an overview of the California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA) and support candidates through the completion and submission of the Subject-Specific Pedagogy (SSP) task. The CalTPA is aligned with the state-adopted content standards for students, as well as with state content frameworks, and the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). (Often cross-listed with EDU 209A) Prerequisite: EDU 150 or EDU 166. 

EDU 109B TPA Lab II (.5)
This lab provides an opportunity for candidates to apply best practices to planning for instruction and differentiating the learning experiences to meet the needs of English learners and students with special needs. To better prepare new teachers, the credential programs have embedded a teaching performance assessment. The assessment is designed to give candidates the opportunity to develop, refine, and demonstrate their teaching knowledge, skills, and abilities. The lab will support candidates through the completion and submission of the CalTPA Designing Instruction (DI) task. (Often cross-listed with EDU 209B) Prerequisite: EDU 109A. 

EDU 110 Supervised Teaching Culminating Seminar (3)
This course is the final seminar in the Elementary, Secondary, and Education Specialist Teacher Preparation Programs. Taken concurrently with the supervised teaching fieldwork, if required, it provides candidates with a culminating weekly forum for discussion, reflection, and goal setting toward developing professionalism as a teacher. Topics that address assessment, curriculum differentiation, the IEP process, effective use of technology, dealing with suspected child abuse, and continued development of professional ethics are geared toward creating a more supported academic learning environment, higher academic achievement, and to assist candidates with classroom management. Course activities will extend candidates? understanding of key concepts and principles in the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and allow candidates to demonstrate competence on the Teaching Performance Assessment. Elementary, secondary and special education students enroll in separate sections of EDU 110. Beginning Spring 2014, candidates will take EDU 110 (3 units) to satisfy requirements met in this course. (Often cross-listed with EDU 210)

EDU 116A Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Elementary Fieldwork (6)
(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site.

EDU 116B Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Elementary Fieldwork (6)
Supervised teaching is designed as the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and provides opportunities for the candidate to integrate and refine the many competencies acquired throughout the program. The goal of supervised teaching is to ensure that the candidate is prepared to assume the full-time responsibilities of a classroom. In EDU 116A and EDU 116B the student assumes the responsibilities of the classroom teacher and is under the direct supervision of an experienced and effective teacher and a college supervisor at MSMC selected sites (see Option I, in the Supervised Teaching section). The supervised teaching involves two assignments, each spanning one-half of the semester in two schools, and at two grade levels (primary and intermediate). Students register for EDU 116A/ for the first assignment and for EDU 116B for the second assignment. Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the seminar (EDU 123 or EDU 110). The student must have access to daily transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 123 Supervised Teaching Culminating Seminar (2)
This course is the final seminar in the Teacher Preparation Program. Taken concurrently with the supervised teaching fieldwork, if required, it provides a culminating forum for discussion, reflection, and goal-setting toward developing professionalism as a teacher. Course activities will extend candidates? understanding of key concepts and principles in the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and allow candidates to demonstrate competence on the Teaching Performance Assessment. Elementary, secondary and special education students enroll in separate sections of EDU 123. The last semester this course will be offered will be Fall 2013. Beginning Spring 2014, candidates will take EDU 110 (3 units) to satisfy requirements met in this course.(Often cross-listed with EDU 323 or 210.)

EDU 138A Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs: Program Development and Curriculum (3)
Various program structures and curricula will be examined together with administrative styles relevant to the operation of early childhood education programs. Development and implementation of appropriate curricula will be stressed as will environmental planning. Course will partially fulfill administrative requirement for Child Development Director Permit.

Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs: Financial and Legal Aspects (3)
Examination of various funding and legal requirements in the operation of early childhood programs with special focus on budgeting, staffing, licensing and compliance with Federal and State requirements. Course will partially fulfill administrative requirement for Child Development Director Permit.

EDU 138C Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs: Management of Non-Profit Programs (3)
This course will introduce non-business majors to managerial theories to lead non-profit organizations. The learning experience includes review of literature, class presentations and active sponsorship of service organizations. A service-learning project integrates theory with practice, requiring team cooperation, planning and accountability. (Also BUS 139, GER 138, PSY 128 and SOC 138)

EDU 150 Elementary Instruction: Theory and Practice (3)
This course is designed to provide growth in effective instructional and management methods within the context of a diverse society. It is the introductory professional preparation course for the Elementary Teacher Preparation Program. Using an interactive and collaborative format, teacher candidates will examine current theory and discuss and practice ways to create positive learning environments for all children, including those learning English. Candidates will learn to use a variety of teaching strategies that support multiple learning styles, different lesson plan formats, and to self-asses their teaching practice. Candidates will also examine their own life experiences and how they influence their teaching philosophy. Candidates will have an opportunity to expand their teaching and management skills through focused observations and participation in an MSMC Teacher Center classroom where the educators are familiar with current instructional theory and practice. If the candidate is already teaching, he/she will also learn ways to look more deeply at his/her own practices. Course meetings will model and utilize effective learning techniques as wells as subject-specific pedagogy for teaching Physical Education and Health in relation to the California Content Standards and Frameworks. The course goal is to extend candidates? abilities to make decisions that are appropriate for a diverse student population where many are just learning English. Note: On-site school observations require weekly visits of 1-2 hours during the instructional day, as well as travel time to and from the fieldwork site. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.(Starting Fall 2012 ? Requires concurrent enrollment with EDU 107 and EDU 108A)(Often cross-listed with EDU 250.)

EDU 151 Typical and Atypical Child and Adolescent Development (1)
Candidates establish a basic understanding of the stages for human development ranging from prenatal through adulthood and the atypical factors that may influence or disrupt the learning stages throughout a lifetime. Numerous disabilities commonly seen in schools, social, cultural and personal influences are associated with the common consequences of atypical development. Candidates learn to effectively construct interventions for resiliency and redevelopment, for both the subject and their families.

EDU 152 Diversity and Schools (1.5)
This course is designed for teacher candidates to explore the role that culture plays and has played in our lives, classrooms, city and country. Students analyze the nature and manifestations of culture, the concepts of cultural contact, and the history of cultural diversity in the United States and California. The dynamics of prejudice are studied, and emphasis is placed on delineating curriculum and practices that honor, motivate, and empower all students. Examination of personal biases and identification of areas of deficient knowledge is encouraged. Use of the Los Angeles community as a powerful resource will be explored.

EDU 154 - Mathematics and Science: Elementary Curriculum (3)
This course examines mathematics and science concepts and theories and their application in teaching. A major focus is on constructivist learning and inquiry and related instructional methods and assessment procedures. Concrete, manipulative materials critical to the learning of mathematics and science are used throughout the course. Emphasis is placed on both individual and group participation.

EDU 155 Social Science and the Arts: Elementary Curriculum (3)
This course is a professional preparation course for the teaching of history-social science and the visual and performing arts in elementary classrooms. Central to the course are the concepts and skills required for the effective planning and teaching of social studies and the arts in relation to the California Content Standards and Frameworks. Credential candidates? study will include recognizing the scope and sequence of curricula; the use of technology and community resources; and understanding the knowledge, skills, and values that can be gained through these disciplines. Candidates use backward design to create an original curriculum unit in which integration between the social sciences and the arts is a primary focus. Varied instructional strategies, multiple means of assessment, and support for all learners including those learning English will be addressed. Note: Observation and participation in community instructional settings plus travel time is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork sites. Prerequisites: EDU 150 and official acceptance in the Elementary Teacher Preparation Program with a passing CBEST score. (Often cross-listed with EDU 255)

EDU 156 Language and Literacy: Elementary Curriculum (3)
This course focuses on the elements of language and literacy learning in the elementary grades and methods for teaching a comprehensive, balanced literacy program to the full range of learners, which includes, but is not limited to struggling readers, students with special needs, English learners, speakers of non-standard English, and advanced learners.. Current theoretical and practical aspects of language arts curriculum and instruction will be learned.. These include systematic, explicit instruction and strategies for developing a comprehensive, balanced literacy program for native English speakers and English language learners; assessment skills necessary for helping individual students; and exploring appropriate materials. Methods and principles for developing proficient readers and writers and for analyzing students? strengths and areas of needed growth will be studied and practiced. Collaborative methods and inclusive practices will be implemented through a co-teaching model by Education Specialist and General Education faculty. Note: Fifteen hours of focused observations and participation (plus travel time) are required in an exemplary elementary school classroom during language arts instruction. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisites: ENG 102 and EDU 150 and official acceptance in the Elementary Teacher Preparation Program with a passing CBEST score. Starting in Fall 2012 the course also requires concurrent enrollment with EDU 108B and EDU 152. (Often cross-listed with EDU 256)

EDU 164A Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Secondary Fieldwork (6)
(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site.

EDU 164B Supervised Teaching: Pre-Service Secondary Fieldwork (6)
(Additional fieldwork fee of $150) Fall or Spring at MSMC approved site. Supervised teaching is designed as the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and provides opportunities for the candidate to integrate and refine the many competencies acquired throughout the program. The goal of supervised teaching is to ensure that the candidate is prepared to assume the full-time responsibilities of a classroom. In EDU 164A and EDU 164B the student assumes the responsibilities of the classroom teacher and is under the direct supervision of an experienced and effective teacher and a college supervisor (see Option I, Supervised Teaching section ). The supervised teaching involves two assignments, each spanning one-half of the semester in two schools, and at two grade levels (middle school and high school). Students register for EDU 164A for the first assignment and for EDU 164B for the second assignment. Full-time teaching is required along with participation in the seminar (EDU 123 or EDU 110). The student must have access to daily transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 166 - Principles of Secondary Education & Content Area Modules (4)
Principles of Secondary Education is the initial professional preparation course in the Secondary Teacher Preparation Program. This course provides opportunities to assess student development and to design and deliver instruction informed by contemporary learning theory and research, practical experience, and inquiry. The role of the teacher is examined as one who assists student performance, with special attention to the needs of adolescents, English learners, Special Needs students, and urban populations and settings. The course addresses numerous teaching strategies such as Socratic Method, Problem Based Learning, Cooperative Learning, and/or Literature Circles. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies. Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline. The coursework and fieldwork include multiple, systematic opportunities for candidates to understand and use instructional practices that promote English language development, including management of first and second languages, classroom organization, and participation by specialists and paraprofessionals. (Often cross-listed with EDU 266) Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site.

EDU 167 - Principles of Secondary Curriculum & Content Area Modules (4)
EDU 167 Principles of Secondary Curriculum and Content Area Modules (4) Principles of Secondary Curriculum is a continuation of EDU 166 and focuses on the teacher as curricular decision-maker and instructional designer. Candidates deepen their knowledge of assessment of student development, design and delivery of instruction, and educational equity. Candidates use backwards design to create longer connected learning sequences or units of instruction and develop performance assessments anchored in the California content standards for their discipline. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies. Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline. (Often cross-listed with EDU 267) Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisite: EDU 166. For undergraduates, official acceptance in the Secondary Teacher Preparation Program with a passing CBEST score.

EDU 168 - Content-Based Reading Instruction & Content Area Modules (4)
Content-Based Reading Instruction encompasses language and literacy development in secondary curricula and methods for enhancing that development with multiethnic, multilingual student populations. The interwoven nature of speaking, reading, writing, and listening in content area instruction will be explored, with emphasis on the importance of content-based discourse in the development of disciplinary understanding and critical thinking. Course content includes instructional and assessment strategies for students learning English as well as those with special needs. Beginning Fall 2013, the course will be co-taught with an instructor from the Education Specialist credential program and will model strategies for having multiple professionals in the classroom. Content Area Modules for each of the content areas are integrated into this course. These modules address content-specific instructional and curricular strategies. Each candidate is enrolled in his/her specific content area module and works with a Content Area Coach, a current expert teacher in that discipline. (Often cross-listed with EDU 268) Note: Approximately 15 hours of fieldwork in the Content Area Coach's classroom is required. Candidates must have access to transportation to the fieldwork site. Prerequisites: ENG 102, EDU 166, and EDU 167.

EDU 170A - Introduction to the Education of Exceptional Learners (1)
This course is designed to introduce teacher preparation candidates to the general educators? role and responsibilities in the education of exceptional learners in the general education classroom. Characteristics of students with disabilities and gifted and talented students are explored as candidates visit programs for exceptional learners. Candidates develop basic skills in the assessment of the learning and language abilities of exceptional learners and apply their knowledge of the state and federal laws pertaining to the education of students with disabilities during a class simulation of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting. Special attention is given to modifying instruction to meet the needs of exceptional learners.(Often cross-listed with EDU 270A) Fulfills the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Level I special education requirement for the Preliminary and Professional Clear Credential.

EDU 191 Child Development Internship (3)
Applied work enhancing student understanding of the principles of child development in community settings. Field work must involve ongoing interactions with children under age 13 and/or their parents. Options include child care, infant/toddler, preschool, school age recreational, hospital child life, special education, resource and referral, and child guidance settings. Prerequisite: PSY 113.

EDU 196H Senior Honors Thesis (3)
Open only to students admitted to the Honors Program.

EDU 199 A/B Special Studies (3)
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing or consent of department.