English
Mount Saint Mary's College
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English

Course Descriptions

ENG 1AB - Freshman English (3,3)
Principles and practice of writing, with attention to critical thinking and analytical reading. Includes discussion skills, library usage, research techniques, and an introduction to literature.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on Writing Placement test. Completion with a grade of C- or better and a score of 4 or better on the Writing Exit test fulfills Communication Skills requirement in writing for both the associate and baccalaureate degrees. GS-IA 

ENG 1C - Freshman English (3)
Option to ENG 1B, with a strong critical thinking emphasis, explores nonfiction, drama, and poetry and requires extensive writing and discussion, focusing on analysis, reasoning, and defining problems. Prerequisite: ENG 1A. Completion with a grade of C- or better and a score of 4 or better on the Writing Exit test fulfills Communications Skills requirement in writing for both the associate and baccalaureate degrees. GS-IA, GS-II

ENG 3X - Basic Writing (3)
A study of basic elements of writing including sentence structure, paragraph development, and mechanics. Does not fulfill the Communication Skills requirement in writing, nor does credit apply to the baccalaureate degree. 

ENG 4X - Essay Writing (3)
Designed to build on the skills developed in ENG 3X Basic Writing, this course focuses on the organizational and grammatical skills necessary for writing short essays. Does not fulfill the communication skills requirement in writing, nor does credit apply toward the baccalaureate degree.

ENG 5H - Freshman Honors English (3)
College writing for students who are accepted for Honors at Entrance, and who earn a grade of 5 or 6 on the Writing placement test or who are admitted by the instructor. A study of selected masterpieces of world literature with emphasis on written analysis. 
Includes introduction to college-level library and research skills. Completion with a grade of B or better fulfills Communications Skills requirements in writing. GS-IA 

ENG 6AB - Written Communication and Analytical Reading (3,3)
A two-semester course focusing on standard written English. Includes expository and analytical writing; library and research skills; analytical reading. Prerequisite: Placement is dependent on scores received in entrance testing. Completion with a grade of C or better in both ENG 6A and 6B and a score of 4 or better on the Writing Exit test fulfills the Communication Skills requirement in writing for the associate degree. 

ENG 7 - Writing for College (3)
Preparation for college-level English, with a focus on standard written English, expository writing, and analytical reading. Prerequisite: Score of 3 or better on Writing Placement test, plus satisfactory scores on the English entrance exams in grammar and reading.

ENG 10AB - Written and Oral Communication (3,3)
Offered only in the ADN Program. A two-term course in college-level reading, writing, and oral communication. Includes expository and analytical writing, analytical reading of fiction and nonfiction works, library research, small group and class discussion, and intensive review of standard written English grammar and punctuation. Completion with grade of C- or better in both 10A and 10B fulfills the associate degree Communications Skills requirement in writing. 

ENG 11 - College Writing (1-3)
Intensive experience in expository writing with special emphasis on continued development of essay skills. Prerequisite: C- or better in ENG 1AB, 6AB, or equivalent. Strongly recommended for students preparing for CBEST and/or transferring to a baccalaureate program.

ENG 12/112 - Literary Analysis (3)
Introduction to college-level literary analysis as applied to drama, poetry, and fiction. GS-IIIB 

ENG 15 - Literature and Society (3)
Examination of society's accomplishments and vexations in selected literary works that portray human striving in family, nation, and technological world. May be repeated for credit. GS-IIIB 

ENG 16 - Literature and the Human Experience (3)
Studies in the stages of human development as portrayed in classic works of Western literature with particular focus on the growth of the self and on the individual's relationship to others and to God. Themes include adolescence, the female experience, love, the family, moral choice, faith, death and dying. May be repeated for credit. GS-IIIB 

ENG 17 - Literary Focus (3)
In-depth study of works selected by author, theme, or genre. May be repeated for credit. GS-IIIB 

ENG 18/118 - Great Works in World Literature (3)
Study of major works in world literature, representing a variety of periods, themes, and genres. GS-IIIB 

ENG 19/119 - Great works in British Literature (3)
Study of major works in British literature, representing a variety of periods and genres. GS-IIIB 

ENG 20/120 - Great Works in American Literature (3)
Study of major works in American literature, representing a variety of periods and genres. GS-IIIB 

ENG 21/121 - Classical Epic and Drama (3)
Reading of the Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, and several Greek tragedies. Study of their origins, development, meaning to the ancient world and to the contemporary reader. GS-IIIB 

ENG 25/125 - Mythmaking: the Quest for Meaning (3)
An exploration of mythmaking in literature as a reflection and interpretation of human experience. Major mythic themes are traced and compared in the arts, as well as in literature. GS-IIIB 

ENG 26 - Literature of the American West (3)
Study of values and themes in American fiction and nonfiction from the perspective of a variety of cultures. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 27/127 - Women in Quest (3)
Study of women's lives and choices in fiction and nonfiction. Emphasis on current literature from diverse ethnic groups. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 28/128 - Contemporary Issues in World Literature (3)
A sampling of contemporary literature from various cultures around the world with emphasis on women authors and their concerns. Students will encounter issues and problems from racism and poverty to domestic violence, rape, prostitution, and war. Course includes relation of students' lives to global issues. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 34 - Literature for the Young Child (3)
A survey of children's literature for lower division students interested in working with young children and primary grade children. Students have experiences in sharing stories or poems with children (includes use of reading, storytelling, flannel board activities, and puppets). Analysis of books based on literary characteristics. Includes study of artist illustrators.

ENG 70/170 - Western Literary Heritage (3)
Selected readings in Greek mythology and literature, the Bible, and Dante’s Divine Comedy. Designed to provide the serious reader with literary and cultural background to better understand and appreciate the range of Western literature. Strongly recommended for English majors. GS-IIIB

ENG 73 - Shakespeare (3)
A study of selected Shakespearean plays and poetry. Because readings vary each semester, course may be repeated for credit. GS-IIIB 

ENG 90 - Internship (1-6)
Students are placed, supervised and evaluated in a position that makes use of the communication skills developed in college English classes. May be repeated for credit up to six units.

ENG 91 - Directed Study (1-3)
Study in a field of special interest, under the direction of a department member. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 92 - Special Studies (3)
Exploration of special interest areas in the study of language and literature. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 1A/6AB, equivalent, or permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 94/194 - Special Studies in Writing (1-3)
Study of a selected mode of writing with focus on technique and practice. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 1AB/C or 6AB, equivalent, or permission of instructor. 

ENG 96 - Workshop (1-3)
May be repeated for credit.

ENG 101 - History of the English Language (3)
Analysis of the prehistoric antecedents of the English language and traces the growth of English from its earliest documentation to modern times, paying attention to structural changes in phonology, morphology and syntax and to the enrichment of the lexicon. Students are introduced to the principles of linguistic evolution. Special emphasis is also placed on the changes in social institutions that affect language and the many ethnic sources that have enriched the resources of English, especially in the United States. 

ENG 102 - Structure of Modern English (3)
Introduction to varieties of contemporary linguistic theories and their application to modern American English. Includes study of the structure of the English language and the conventions of standard English, basic principles of first and second language acquisition and development, theories of language acquisition in relation to the social context, and implications of speaking a primary language other than the ``mainstream'' language.

ENG 104 - Expository Writing (3)
Intensive review of standard English grammar and punctuation for students wishing to improve their writing proficiency. Advanced analytical reading and critical thinking. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 105 - Advanced Composition (3)
Designed to meet the particular needs of the Liberal Studies major. Assignments include academic, professional, and personal writing that enables the student to increase writing confidence and competency by exploring the English language, reviewing basic skills, and discovering one's style. Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 1AB or equivalent, and score of 4 or better on the Writing Placement test.

ENG 106 - Creative Writing (3)
Students write fiction, poetry, and personal essays from their experiences and observations. May be repeated for credit.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENG 107 - Professional Writing (3)
An examination of the kinds of writing used in the communications media, with practice in developing newspaper, magazine, television, or radio material. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENG 108 - The News Media (3)
A critical examination of the news media, showing how print and broadcast news organizations operate and giving extensive practice in evaluating media reporting of current stories. GS-II

ENG 109 - Writing: Voice and View (3)
Nonfiction writing as a literary art. Designed for good writers and anyone who enjoys the challenge of responding to life through the written word. An opportunity to develop one's personal style and voice while examining the work of great essayists past and present. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENG 122 - Love in World Literature (3)
The idea of love studied in historical perspective through the analysis of literary works. Focus on critical enjoyment. GS-IIIB 

ENG 123 - Women's Voices in Literature (3)
Major contemporary works by women studied in the context of current critical theory. Impact of women's voices from diverse ethnic groups. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 124 - Fiction to Film (3)
Examination of how works of fiction become motion pictures. The component elements of both fiction and film are applied to representative novels to assess their adaptation from the medium of fiction to the medium of film. GS-IIIB 

ENG 126 - The American Experience (3)
Study of works of American literature from various periods of history and representative of the cultures and ethnic identities that make up the American heritage. GS-IIIB, VI 

ENG 129 - Ethnic Literatures of America (3)
Introduction to major ethnic literatures of the United States with emphasis on women authors. Comparative study including two or more of the following groups: African American, Asian American , Latino/a, Native American, Jewish. Interdisciplinary approach using historical and sociopolitical context to address issues of race, class, and gender. GS-IIIB, VI.

ENG 130 - Faith and Fiction (3)
A study of Christian poets, dramatists, and novelists in historical perspective. Focus on both the changing and the unchanging aspects of Christian faith. GS-IIIB 

ENG 131 - Russian Literature (3)
Major Russian authors examined in their cultural and historical contexts. Writers include Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Solzhenitsyn. GS-IIIB 

ENG 134 - Children's Literature (3)
Wide reading of children's books, including Caldecott and Newbery awards and honor books. Multicultural emphasis spans all genres covered, Focus on appreciation of literature, as well as on literary analysis of the selections. Includes study of critics in the field and of illustrators.

ENG 135 Classic American Film As Visual Literature (3)
Study of Classic American film from the invention of the motion picture to the present day that is representative of diverse cultures and ethnic identities that comprise a visual literature on film.  GS-IIIB

ENG 143 - English Literature: Beowulf to 1500 (3)
Major works of the medieval period studied in their historical and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: HIS 1A in addition to regular literature prerequisites.

ENG 144 - English Literature: 1500 to 1700 (3)
Major works of the Renaissance and Restoration studied in their historical and cultural contexts. 
Prerequisite: HIS 1A in addition to regular literature prerequisites.

ENG 145 - American Literature: Beginnings to 1914 (3)
Major works of colonial, early federal, and nineteenth-century America studied in the light of their historical contexts.

ENG 146 - American Literature: 1914 to Present (3)
Study of major works of modern America; consideration of how the literature reflects the condition of society after World War I.

ENG 147 - English Literature: 1700 to 1900 (3)
Major works of the 18th Century, Romantic and Victorian periods studied in their historical and cultural contexts.

ENG 148 - Twentieth Century English and European Literature (3)
Major contemporary works studied in their historical and cultural contexts. 

ENG 156H - The Modern Temper (3)
An exploration of the concept of the modern, through a study of nineteenth and twentieth-century literature, with particular attention to the interfacing of literature with history, philosophy, religion, or the behavioral sciences. Recommended for upper division honors students. GS-IIIB 

ENG 161 - Study of the Novel (3)
Chronological reading and study of representative novels from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Emphasis on critical enjoyment and awareness of the novel's changing form. 

ENG 162 - Study of Poetry (3)
Study of the development of poetry from its beginnings to the twentieth century with emphasis on critical enjoyment.

ENG 163 - Study of Drama (3)
Analysis of representative plays from major periods of theater history with emphasis on works of classical, European, English, and American playwrights; theories of interpretation are applied.

ENG 164 - American Drama

In-depth study of American drama. Plays ranging from Eugene O’Neill to the present selected to reflect the rich cultural diversity that gives American drama its distinctive voice. GS-IIIB, VI

ENG 165 - Novels of the Americas: Latino Voices (3)
Major contemporary Latin American and U.S. Latino novelists examined in cultural, historical, and political contexts. Multicultural emphasis shows how the two groups influence each other while also showing their unique traits. Writers include Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Cristina Garcia. GS-IIIB, VI

ENG 172 - Chaucer (3)
Readings in the poetry of Chaucer, principally the Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, with reference to the minor works. 

ENG 173 - Shakespeare (3)
Appreciation of Shakespeare's range and art as a playwright through study of works from different periods of his development; combination of in-depth and background study. GS-IIIB 

ENG 174 - Shakespeare Seminar
(3)
Advanced study and research in the works of Shakespeare, with attention to Renaissance culture and thought. Culminates in a written project. Designed for upper-division English majors, but other upper-division students may be admitted with permission of instructor.

ENG 181 - Theory and Criticism (3)
Advanced study in methods of examining and discussing literature. Practice in literary analysis. Consideration of selected major critical theories and documents.

ENG 184 - Studies in British and American Literature
(3)
Study of selected authors, literary periods, or genres. May be repeated for credit. Designed for upper-division English majors, but other upper-division students may be admitted with permission of instructor.

ENG 190 - Internship (1-6)
Students are placed and supervised in business or administrative positions that make use of the skills developed in the major study. May be repeated for credit up to 6 units. Prerequisites vary and are determined in consultation with the coordinator. 

ENG 191 - Directed Study (1-3)
Study in a field of special interest under the direction of a department member. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 192 - Special Studies (1-3)
Exploration of special interest areas in the study of language and literature. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 1AB, equivalent, or permission of instructor. GS-IIIB 

ENG 193 - Special Studies in Language and Literature (3)
Advanced reading and research in selected areas of language and literature. May be repeated for credit. Designed for upper-division English majors, but other upper-division students may be admitted with permission of instructor.
 
ENG 195 - English Seminar (3)
Designed to provide upper-division English majors with an opportunity for in-depth investigation into literature and ideas; culminates in a written project. English minors and other upper-division students admitted with permission of instructor.

ENG 196H - Senior Honors Thesis
(3)
Open only to students admitted to the Honors Program.