Mathematics
Mount Saint Mary's College
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Mathematics

Course Descriptions

BIO 1A - Biological Dynamics (4)
An introduction to the science of biology and the variety of organisms in the biosphere. Topics presented include theories relative to the origin of life, molecular biology, cellular structure and function, evolution as a unifying principle in biology, and processes of inheritance. Laboratory experiences give students an opportunity to understand scientific methods of investigation. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs. GS-II,IIID

BIO 1B - Biological Dynamics (4)
An introduction to the study of biology and the variety of organisms at the organismic, population, and environmental levels. Included are topics dealing with the structures and coordination of functions of complex multicellular organisms, biological factors that support community life systems, ecological interrelationships of plants and animals, and human impact upon the environment. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1A. GS-II,IIID

BIO 105 - Immunology (4)
Basic principles and theories of immune mechanisms. Topics include innate immunity, antibody stimulation and production, cellular immunity and cell interactions, autoimmunity, tissue transplantation, immune deficiency, diagnostic and technological applications of immunological techniques. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 3 or 1AB or 50AB

BIO 125 - Developmental Biology (4)
This course presents a comprehensive study of the patterns and processes that underlie animal development from conception through old age. The overall approach to this discipline is to address each of the major topical areas from both conceptual and comparative viewpoints so that students develop broad based and in-depth understanding of developmental process and the results of each process. - Topics will include the molecular level control of gene expression during development, the cellular basis of morphogenesis and pattern formation, molecular and cellular level bases of differentiation, induction and growth of the embryo. Also, the course will examine the phenomena of regeneration and remodeling as they pertain to the development of appropriate organisms. Laboratory studies will include the examination of selected developmental systems such as ciliated protozoans, flatworms, sea urchins, chicks and humans. Prerequisites: Biology 1AB and/or 50AB. Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs.

BIO 130 - Genetics (4)
Basic concepts of genetics including classical genetics and molecular genetics. Examines genetics of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. - Topics include Mendelian - inheritance, gene replication, expression and regulation, mutations, transposable elements, population genetics, and - introduction to biotechnology. - Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1AB or BIO 50AB.

BIO 135 - Techniques in Molecular Biology (4)
An overview of the techniques used in genetic engineering. Emphasis will be placed on the structure, handling and manipulation of nucleic acids. Current topics in genetic engineering such as transgenic animals and human gene therapy will be discussed. Laboratory studies include isolation and analysis of DNA, cloning genes, preparation and screening of genomic libraries, and hybridization techniques such as Southern and Northern blotting. Lecture 3 hrs. Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisites: A grade of C- or above in BIO lA/B and CHEM lA/B

BIO 151 - Medical Physiology (4)
A detailed study of the functional processes of the human body from the molecular to the organ system levels; dynamics of fluid balance, control mechanisms, transport systems, aging, and neuroendocrine and neuromuscular integration will be included. - References to pathophysiology will be made. Laboratory activities include the use of multiple monitoring and data acquisition systems. - Lecture 3 hrs., Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1AB, CHE 1AB.

BIO 152 - Cellular Biology (4)
This course involves in-depth analysis of eukaryotic cell structure and function. Topics include membrane structure and transport, cell communication, synthesis and trafficking of proteins, and the cytoskeleton. Laboratory techniques will include experimental techniques in cellular biology, including sub-cellular fractionation, cell culture, histochemistry, microscopy, and spectrophotometry. - Lecture 3 hrs. Laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisites: A grade of C- or above in BIO 1AB, CHE 6A.

BIO 180 - Endocrinology (4)
A study of the molecular synthesis and physiological functions of hormones in living systems especially as they are understood in humans. - The course will cover neuroendocrine controls, genetics of hormone synthesis, mechanisms of hormone action, reproductive physiology, - somatic growth and development, thyroid and adrenal gland physiology, - glucose and calcium homeostases, and the integration and assessment of endocrine functions with the use of clinical examples throughout - the course. Lecture 3 hrs. Laboratories will be individually designed and directed. Prerequisites: - BIO 135, BIO 151, CHE 6A/B.

CHE 1A - General Chemistry (3)
Lecture, three hours. Atomic theory, atomic structure and the periodic table; molecular structure and bonding; structure and properties of solids, liquids, and gases; kinetic theory and colligative properties. Prerequisites: High school chemistry, three years of high school mathematics, and satisfactory score on Chemistry Placement Examination, or grade of C or better in CHE 3. GS-II,IIID.

CHE 1AL - General Chemistry Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, four hours per week. Quantitative techniques including gravimetric and volumetric analyses; qualitative techniques including isolation of compounds and descriptive chemistry of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 1A (recommended) or completion of CHE 1A with a grade of C or better.

CHE 1B - General Chemistry (3)
Lecture, three hours. Equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics,oxidation-reduction reactions and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHE 1A.

CHE 1BH - General Chemistry: Honors Section (1)
Laboratory, four hours per week: Acid-base behavior, thermodynamics concepts, transition metal complexes, and kinetics. Emphasis will be on problem solving and data analysis using the computer. Prerequisite: CHE 1A and consent of instructor. Open only to students admitted to the Honors Programs.

CHE 1BL - General Chemistry Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, four hours per week. Calorimetry and thermodynamics experiments, instrumental methods, including spectrophotometers and pH meters; transition metal chemistry. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHE 1A and concurrent enrollment in CHE 1B (recommended) or completion of CHE 1B with a grade of C- or better.

CHE 3 - Foundations of Chemistry (3)
Lecture, three hours. An introduction to the principles and laws of chemistry including atomic structure and the periodic table, bonding, nomenclature, stoichiometry, gases, solutions, and introductory organic chemistry. Note: This course is a prerequisite to CHE 1A if the student fails to qualify for CHE 1A on the Chemistry Placement Examination. GS-II,IIID.

CHE 4 - Foundations of Chemistry in the Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, 2 hours. Application of fundamental concepts including measurements, empirical formulas, energy in reactions, physical states of matter, and solution behavior. Prerequisite: Past or concurrent enrollment in CHE 3. It is highly recommended that students take this course concurrently with CHE 3.

CHE 6A - Organic Chemistry (3)
Lecture, three hours. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and organometallic compounds. Organic nomenclature, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, NMR and IR spectroscopy, organic synthesis. Prerequisite: Grade of C - or better in CHE 1B.

CHE 6AL - Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, four hours. Methods of separations, purification, and identification of organic compounds; introduction to synthesis. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 6A (recommended) or completion of CHE 6A with a grade of C - or better.

CHE 6B - Organic Chemistry (3)
Lecture, three hours. Continuation of Chemistry 6A. Reactions of functional groups and aromatic compounds; synthesis. Introduction to chemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Prerequisite: Grade of C - or better in CHE 6A. CHE 6BL Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1)Laboratory, four hours per week. Synthesis and reactions of typical organic compounds; introduction to biochemical methods of analysis. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 6B (recommended) or completion of CHE 6A with a grade of C or better.

CHE 6BL - Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, four hours per week. Synthesis and reactions of typical organic compounds; introduction to biochemical methods of analysis. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 6B (recommended) or completion of CHE 6A with a grade of C or better.

CHE 104 - Qualitative Organic Analysis (3)
Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. Microtechniques, separation of mixtures, derivatives, identification of unknown organic compounds, spectroscopic methods. Prerequisite: CHE 6B.

CHE 107 - Biochemistry (3)
Lecture 3 hours. The study of the molecular components of cells with emphasis on physical and chemical properties and biological functions. An introduction to enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics and the central pathways of carbohydrate metabolism. Prerequisite: CHE 6B.

CHE 107L - Biochemistry Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, four hours per week. Techniques in the isolation and characterization of biomolecules with an emphasis on proteins. Introduction to enzyme kinetics. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 107 (recommended) or completion of CHE 107 with a grade of C- or better.

CHE 109 - Advanced Biochemistry (3)
Gluconeogenesis, photosynthesis, metabolism of fatty acids and cholesterol, biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins. Topics from among the following: biophysical spectroscopy, DNA damage and repair, neurochemistry, biochemistry of vision, metals in biochemistry. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: CHE 107 with a grade of C- or better.

CHE 110A - Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics (4)
Lecture, four hours. Laws of thermodynamics, chemical equilibria and cell emf. Mathematical techniques for the analysis of chemical problems by means of computers. Prerequisites: CHE 1B, MTH 3B, PHY 11B (or 1B), MTH 9 or 9H.

CHE 110B - Physical Chemistry: Dynamics (3)
Lecture, three hours. Kinetic theory, transport processes, chemical kinetics and quantum mechanics. Use of the computer for the analysis of problems in the preceding areas. Prerequisite: CHE 110A.

CHE 111 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2)
Laboratory, six hours. Chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics and transport processes, conductance, diffusion. Prerequisite: CHE 110A.

CHE 120 - Instrumental Methods of Analysis (3)
Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. Theory and applications of modern instrumental methods including gas chromatography, various spectroscopic methods and selected electrochemical methods. Prerequisite: CHE 6B or consent of instructor.

CHE 130 - Biochemical Methods (3)
Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. Experimental techniques in biochemistry. Chromatography, electrophoresis, and spectroscopic methods applied to the preparation and measurement of biochemical substances. Prerequisite: CHE 107

CHE 190 - Inorganic Chemistry (3)
Lecture, three hours. Chemistry of inorganic systems with emphasis on reaction mechanisms, complexes, bonding and periodic relationships. Prerequisite: CHE 1B.

CHE 195H - Senior Honors Thesis (3)
Open only to students admitted to the honors program.

CHE 196 - Internship (1-3) An intensive work study program for qualified upper division students. The student is responsible for setting up the internship in conjunction with the appropriate faculty and the office of Career Planning and Placement. The internship must be approved by the department chairperson.

CHE 197 - Seminar (1-3)

CHE 98/198 - Topics in Chemistry (1-3)
Prerequisite: Consent of chemistry staff.

CHE 199 - Research in Chemistry (1-3)
Research problems to be arranged with individual faculty members. Prerequisite: Consent of chemistry staff.

CIS 1 - Computer Processes and Applications (3)
Description of the computer and its logical structure and functioning including hardware (processors, storage, and communications), networking, and levels of software. - Introduction to BASIC programming languages and binary systems. - Use of application programs for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, Internet, and e-mail.

CIS 2 - Introduction to Computer Programming (3)
An exploration of computer processes: data and file structure; databases and retrieval of information; programming using various languages (which may include BASIC, Fortran90, C++, Perl, Java, or Prologue). - Prerequisite: - Grade of C or higher in CIS 1 or consent of instructor. 

CIS 87 Technology Internship (1)
This course is a one-year experience during which a student participates by assisting faculty and various academic and administrative departments in using technology effectively and efficiently. (Taken at sophomore level or later.)

CIS 120 Communication Protocols (3)
This course is a one-year experience during which a student participates by assisting faculty and various academic and administrative departments in using technology effectively and efficiently. (Taken at sophomore level or later.)

MTH 1 - College Algebra and Trigonometry (4)
Set language and notation, real and complex numbers, fundamental operations, inequalities; polynomial, exponential, and trigonometric functions, and their graphs; De Moivre's theorem. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or completion of MTH 2X. GS-II, IIIE.

MTH 5A - Calculus I (4)
Limits; continuity; derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications; anti-derivatives; an introduction to the definite integral; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: Three to four years of high school mathematics including trigonometry and satisfactory score on Mathematics Placement Examination or grade of C - or better in

Techniques of integration (including substitution and parts); numerical methods of integration; applications of the integral (including areas, and volumes); improper integrals; infinite series; an introduction to parametric equations and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: Grade of C - or better in MTH 5A. GS-IIIE, VIIB

MTH 5B - Calculus II (4)
Techniques of integration (including substitution and parts); numerical methods of integration; applications of the integral (including areas, and volumes); improper integrals; infinite series; an introduction to parametric equations and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: Grade of C - or better in MTH 5A. GS-IIIE, VIIB

MTH 5C - Calculus III (4)
Partial derivatives; multiple integrals; three-dimensional space; vectors in two- and three-dimensional space; vector calculus. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MTH 5B or consent of instructor. GS-VIIB

MTH 25 - The LINUX/UNIX Environment (3)
Basic LINUX and UNIX commands, the file systems, pipes, filters, shell procedures, reading of binary files and programming debugging aids. Prerequisite: CIS 2 and familiarity with a compiled programming language; MTH 5A is highly recommended.

MTH 38 - Elements of Probability and Statistics (3)
Elementary probability theory, properties of distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or completion of MTH 2X. GS-II, IIIE.

MTH 38H - Elements of Probability and Statistics (3)
Topics in probability and statistics including measures of central tendency and spread, elementary probability theory, properties of distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear correlations and regression. An algebra based course intended primarily for non-mathematic majors. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement. Examination or completion of MTH 2X. Open only to students admitted to the honors program. GS-II, IIIE.

MTH 50 Elementary Number Systems (3)
Sets, numeration systems, properties of integers, rational and real numbers, elementary number theory, modular systems, problem-solving processes, ratio, proportion, percentage. This course receives General Studies credit and is required for Liberal Studies majors. Can be taken for professional credit. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination. GS-IIIE, VIIA

MTH 51 Elements of Geometry and Statistics (3)
Intuitive geometry of lines, planes, and space; congruence, similarity, measurement, geometric constructions, elements of probability and statistics. This course is intended primarily for Liberal Studies majors. Can be taken for professional credit. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination. GS-IIIE, VIIB

MTH 101 - Topics in Geometry (3)
A brief treatment of the axiomatic foundations of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. An introduction to differential geometry. Prerequisite: MTH 5C, 103 concurrent.

MTH 102 - Advanced Calculus (3)
Set theory, real numbers and their topology, limits, continuity, differentiation and integration theory. Prerequisite: MTH 5C.

MTH 103 - Linear Algebra (3)
Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MTH 5B.

MTH 111 - Abstract Algebra (3)
Numbers and number systems, groups, rings; fields; homomorphism and isomorphism theorems. Prerequisite: MTH 5C; MTH 120 strongly recommended or consent of instructor.

MTH 113 - Probability and Statistics (3)
Probability as a mathematical system, random variables and their distributions, limit theorems, statistical applications, hypotheses testing. - Prerequisite: MTH 5C or consent of instructor.

MTH 119 - Differential Equations (3)
Linear equations, series solutions, Laplace transforms, numerical methods, existence and uniqueness of solutions. Prerequisite: MTH 5B.

MTH 120 - Discrete Mathematics (3)
Logic, proof writing (including induction), set theory, functions and relations, algorithms and recursion, elementary number theory, combinatorics, probability, graph theory, and trees. - Prerequisite: MTH 5B. - GS-VIIB

MTH 125 - Programming (3)
Intermediate level programming methods including vector and array manipulations, classes, functions, and subroutines. - Applications in science, mathematics, and business. Prerequisite: CIS 2 and MTH 5A or concurrent enrollment in MTH 5A or consent of the instructor. GS-IIIE

MTH 128AB - Numerical Analysis (3,3)
Solutions of large systems of linear algebraic equations. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. Interpolation: Lagrange and Newton polynomials. Fourier series and orthogonal polynomials. Introduction to the theory of ordinary differential equations. Heun and Runge-Kutta numerical techniques. Numerical determination of real and complex roots of polynomials; cubic splines; numerical treatment of partial differential equations, techniques of numerical integration. - Prerequisites: MTH 5C, MTH 20.

MTH 135 - Structure and Comparison of Programming Languages (3)
Basic concepts of syntax and semantics. Comparison of syntax and semantics of selected programming languages. Language design. How to evaluate a computer programming language. Prerequisites: MTH 5A, MTH 20, or consent of instructor.

MTH 140 - History of Mathematics (1)
History of mathematics from antiquity to the mid 20th century. Prerequisites: MTH 5C, MTH 103, and demonstrated mathematical maturity.

PHY 1A - Introductory Physics IA (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. An algebra-based physics course covering statics, dynamics, and an introduction to electricity. Prerequisite: Two years of high school mathematics and a satisfactory performance on the Mathematics Placement Examination or completion of MTH 1 with a grade of C- or better. GS-IIID.

PHY 1B - Introductory Physics IB (3)
Lecture, three hours. Continuation of PHY 1A: electricity, magnetism, optics, and an introduction to modern physics. Prerequisite: C- or better in PHY 1A.

PHY 1BL - Introductory Physics Laboratory (1)
Experiments in mechanics, electric fields, circuits, optics, radioactivity. Emphasis is placed on quantitative analysis of data. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in PHY 1A (or PHY 11A) and concurrent enrollment in PHY 1B (or PHY 11B) or completion of PHY 1B (or 11B) with a grade of C- or better.

PHY 11A - Mechanics (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. A calculus-based physics course covering the statics and dynamics of particles, gravitation, potentials and fields, and fluid mechanics. Prerequisite: A calculus course, concurrent enrollment in MTH 3A, or consent of instructor.

PHY 11B - Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics (3)
Lecture, three hours. A calculus-based physics course covering electric and magnetic fields, circuit theory, and optics. Prerequisite: PHY 11A or consent of instructor.